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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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29 minutes ago, iowaboy1965 said:

Gary, so sorry to hear of Sharon's stroke. I hope she is recovering nicely.

iowaboy1965, she's doing quite well, but some things will likely never be the same again? Thanks for your concern! Gary?

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Gary----

Tell Sharon to keep her chin up and keep on coming forward------just do it one step at the time.  (no hurry)

Take care of her--------don't worry about this old tractor forum for old codgers. 

Most of us at our age have strokes, etc stuffed back in our closet somewhere----I have two (last one being 1998).

Wish ya'll the best.?   Keep us posted.

 

DD

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Im glad to hear she is doing well Gary and hoping and praying for the best recovery possible.

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Sorry to hear that news Gary but glad Sharon is getting on well!  Hope all the best and a speedy recovery back to good health. ????

Neat to see the new graduate include Sharon into the festivities!!  

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Prayers for you and Sharon.

 

Can't be too easy havin a steam engineer for a nurse...

 

Your grandkids have really grown up.  They seem like fine young people, I'm sure y'all are proud.

 

Regards,

Will

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Prayers sent for both of you?And extended family

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Gary,  I'm sure sorry to hear about Sharon's stroke. Please know that you have many friends here who are all likely hoping and praying for a good outcome for you and her. Take good care of her, but don't be afraid to ask for help. Take care of yourself as well. You will be of no use to anyone if you become overburdened. 

In regards to your pic of the Hart-Parr tractor and implement. 1314699203_HartParrtractorpullingequipme I believe I see a stationary hay press and a hay loader. Perhaps an inventive farmer connected the two and powered it via PTO. I see a low platform for a man to ride on and tie the bales. I assume that there is another on the other side of the bale chamber. That would probably be a miserable place to work, nearly underneath the loader. Or perhaps the man shown could reach over the chamber and feed the  wire? I wonder if it was a farmer engineered unit or if a manufacturer was prototyping a pull type baler? Interesting pic for certain. 

Take Care. 

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...from another old 78 yr RP member., Gary.....wishing you and your Lady all the best.....

...??

.....and , as always...thanks for those pictures...

Kind Regards          Mike

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7 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

I'm just checking back in. This upgraded Red Power Magazine page has become a PITA. Yes, a Pain In The A$$. I got the notification below 12 times when posting 18 photos. So you have to go through the procedure each time, it sends this message:

Sorry, an unknown server error occurred when uploading this file.

(Error code: -200)

Gary, prayers for Sharon and you along with the rest of your family. Really nice that she got to see the youngin' graduate even though it wasn't in person.

l didn't know Red Power site had been upgraded again. l was thinking it was my computer messing up. Maybe BJ will get it straightened out soon.

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Gary, Sorry to hear about Sharon.  We'll keep thinking of ya'll.  Hope she does OK.  

I'm in agreement on the Hart Parr with the hay baler.  If I remember correctly, Hart Parr was the first tractor with independent PTO.  Actually, it was just a fluke as I believe the other companies already had a PTO but Hart Parr put a PTO on their then current design.  And the only way they could think to do it was to take power off the front (RH side of the crank shaft) of the engine or behind the starting crank, and of course with a clutch, gave it independent PTO.  

Thanks for all the photos.  

1314699203_HartParrtractorpullingequipme

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Gary--

The doctor will probably prescribe either Xrelto or Elequist (as one of many) when she goes home.

Either is highly rated for prevention of blood clots (and subsequently strokes).  both are Hellacious expensive---------be prepared.

I don't know the details------but we ran our prescription through several times before finally getting a reduced price.  Talk to your doctor and druggist.  (Milinda takes Eloquist an I take Xrelto-----along with many more-------all equals $$$$$$$)

Get all the free samples the doc will give you.

Good luck again.

 

 

 

DD

 

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I'm sorry to hear of Sharon's health concerns, but pray that she recovers quickly and that you also stay healthy as her caregiver.  That's a big job in itself and can be trying for you.  My best to both of you. 

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Tim "the Tool Man" Taylor stopped by Booger Creek Gin yesterday to show off his new van and sell a few tools.  Right after he left, Hank Hill showed up with propane and propane accessories.

Actually l drew and printed the decals on my computer. Just enjoy doing stuff like that. l'm not sure why the rear pic of the propane truck is so distorted. l'm thinking it is because the tank end is so round.

 

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Strickland Propane-revised.jpg

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On 6/7/2021 at 3:18 PM, Old Binder Guy said:

Last but not least is this cab forward (actually on the rear end of the engine facing the normal rear) Southern Pacific steam locomotive. It is a four cylinder, 12 driver articulated engine, used for pulling trains through long tunnels. Since steam engines operate just as good, and fast, in "reverse," (its NEW FORWARD!) it's no problem for the engine companies to build this special cab. However, I don't know how the coal is put in the firebox on the cab end from the coal tender in the "rear"? Maybe Roger can explain that too?? Water from the tender is easy to pipe "forward."  Gary?

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While I don't post much here I really enjoy this thread! More a book than a thread..... Prayers sent for Sharon, hope she is doing better!

As a bit of a steam locomotive fan and in my younger days had a nice size HO layout that included a cab forward. The answer to the coal question is actually easy: They burned  oil! #6 bunker fuel to be exact. I wonder what the viscosity at low temperatures was....lol.

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On 6/10/2021 at 3:44 PM, TomH said:

While I don't post much here I really enjoy this thread! More a book than a thread..... Prayers sent for Sharon, hope she is doing better!

As a bit of a steam locomotive fan and in my younger days had a nice size HO layout that included a cab forward. The answer to the coal question is actually easy: They burned  oil! #6 bunker fuel to be exact. I wonder what the viscosity at low temperatures was....lol.

Duh... Thanks TomH, Maybe the first cab forwards burned coal. But it never entered my mind they were burning oil in this late model articulated engine. 

I grew up on a Milwaukee RR spur line that always burned coal until I saw the last steam engine go by our farm. It was pulling its coal tender, another same type locomotive with the side irons removed and sticking out of its coal tender, and pulling another coal tender. They were headed to scrap in 1956. The Milwaukee RR had huge coal mines at Roundup, Montana that supplied their smaller engines, and where we also got stoker coal for our house in central Montana. I only saw photos of oil burner steam locomotives at a much later date. The GNRY at Whitefish, Montana where I retired out of their schools as Maintenance Chief, was where I'd learned (obviously not very well either!?) about oil burner engines. Everything was diesel electric when I moved there. I just saw photos. Many of the photos show things like this old Mallet Compound coal burner with a belpaire firebox at Whitefish.

1649092532_GNRYMalletCompoundatWhitefishMontanasteamlocomotiveinyardspostcardDavidFuller.thumb.jpg.b46490f256f8723864476a69cedb3947.jpg

A view of old Whitefish in the coal and water days of steam locomotives.

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A view looking southwest from atop the coaling tower in Whitefish, where the tenders were filled with coal.

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And from about 1925+ is this photo of an oil burner GNRY steam locomotive in Whitefish. The new "Vanderbilt" tenders were set up with a tank for oil. Thanks again for correcting me regarding that cab forward locomotive being an oil burner too! I certainly don't have all of the answers... It's obvious! Gary?

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PS: TomH, the viscosity of their Bunker #6 "tar" was easily "thinned" by heating it with steam, which was plentiful.
 

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Thanks Gary!

 

 

The cab forwards as well as thousands of other locomotives were built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in Philadelphia. 

On the right side under proprietors you see the name Wm.P Henszey. That is my Mothers great ( maybe great, great) uncle! Which is what got me interested in steam locomotives!

 

                      600px-Baldwin_Locomotive_Works_1882_ad.j

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A nice Rumley pic for you fellas that I took today. They had a Keck Gonnerman steam engine running a saw mill but I didn’t get any pics of that. 

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Any room for a new owner operator hauling in and out of the Booger Creek Gin?  

Little man got a new truck yesterday at a toy show so Dad decided he needed one also for a few dollars out of the used toy basket at a booth.  I can’t leave anything alone so I took it all apart and painted it.  Everything was white to begin with.  I need to find a trailer for it now I guess....

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On 6/12/2021 at 6:31 PM, Sledgehammer said:

A nice Rumley pic for you fellas that I took today. They had a Keck Gonnerman steam engine running a saw mill but I didn’t get any pics of that. 

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Todd, Roger clicked on "LIKE" but didn't tell us which late model of Oilpull this is. I guess he's getting older too? Gary?

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TwoStep----

Tell the boys out at Booger Creek Gin that they would do well in picking up Hammer & Son as a gin client.

They are one of the largest cotton growers in the Mid-West.  Good folks------I have furnished them their cotton seed in years past.  They were working small acreage back then------but I am sure have expanded lots by now.

??

 

DD

 

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22 minutes ago, Delta Dirt said:

TwoStep----

Tell the boys out at Booger Creek Gin that they would do well in picking up Hammer & Son as a gin client.

They are one of the largest cotton growers in the Mid-West.  Good folks------I have furnished them their cotton seed in years past.  They were working small acreage back then------but I am sure have expanded lots by now.

??

 

DD

 

How can you turn down a letter of recommendation like that!! ? Thanks DD

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12 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

Any room for a new owner operator hauling in and out of the Booger Creek Gin?  

You'd be more than welcome to come down and haul cotton to a warehouse or haul cottonseed to a oil mill. Booger Creek Gin is also looking for new customers no matter how far away they might be. Just last year we contracted for all of the cotton crop on Tony Ramos Farms Inc. out in California. And we have a luxurious mobile home we furnish to all contract haulers while they're here.

 

shasta-lone star camper.JPG

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I’m in!  You should be able to hear the Detroit screaming in the KW by the time I cross into Oklahoma. ?

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TwoStep-----

Keep that Lone Star camper trailer locked down tight------I see the cartel is back in action.  (stole 2 semi loads of ammunition----see thread started by Acem)

Don't reckon it would hold many people (maybe 37--39?)--------but would just about be ideal size and shape for smuggling 1 large watermelon!!??

 

DD

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