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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


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Gary, keep the ramblings coming!!  I agree with Hammer, that’s likely a W6 since it’s pulling what appears to be a 3 bottom plow. I don’t think a W4 would be able to do that in even the best conditions. 

I think the speed mower may be based off a BN.  The wide front end is centered so the rear end would likely be also. Plus the weight of the mower hanging out to the right would make the BN a better choice. What is interesting about that unit is the hydraulics. This was well before the Super A and C type hydraulic unit came out. The arm the lifting chain is attached to is not like the the later touch control unit. Looks like there are a couple of hydro handles back near the throttle area. I’ve read there were a few late Bs that were equipped with hydraulics but haven’t seen a picture. Who knows what IH was playing with back then. Neat picture!

The little guy learning to drive on the M is actually on what would be a very valuable tractor today, a Super MTA Diesel. The TA shift mechanism is visible on the side of the tractor as well as the flat head lights.  

If you want wait a little bit on the A water casting, I’m 99% sure I saw one at the tractor bone yard laying next to a disassembled tractor. I need to go up there this spring after the snow melts to get a manifold for a AC WD-45 I need to get running. I think I might also have a gasoline starter tank for the distillate setup if you want to fill the hole in your hood. Just for looks but something fun on the old girl!

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When I arrived at Silver Creek this morning, Son Mike was finishing mowing meadow grass down by the barley field. It will be hay for Heather's goats. He was just finishing up and brought the Farmall F

A little background on the 1917 Acme truck.  I got it from the VanHorn Truck Museum in exchange for a bunch of work I did for them back in 1997.  I was a typical museum vehicle,  painted up but not op

Here’s a little more red iron for your thread Gary!  I finished the engine rebuild on my 1953 Super C last night and took her for a drive this morning. Runs like a top!! It was a

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5 hours ago, Roger Byrne said:

Gary, the Rumely you posted plowing is a 20-40 Model G Oil Pull.   It was built from 1918 until 1924 and weighed in at nearly 13,000 pounds.  It was rated to pull a four bottom plow, handle a 10' road grader and run a 32" threshing machine.  The engine had a 8" bore with a 10" stroke and ran at 450 RPM.

160317168_RumelyOilpullsmallertractorplowingIH.jpg.3f2421bc649652cc9b3f1634599a6857.thumb.jpg.316e7cb3fcac35e803ba9a4a644283dc.jpg

The photo you posted also shows the optional self-steering attachment in action saving the operator a lot of work.  Just drop the double disks at the end of the long shaft into the last furrow, turn the steering wheel a little to the left and the tractor is guided to the end of the field.  The self steering device was a popular option on several of these early tractors.  Below is a video of one being used on a 10-20 Titan.  The Titan isn't working very hard, they are a three bottom tractor.

There is a story about a large farmer that owned four 10-20 Titans and his manager just used two guys to plow large long fields.  They would break the field open with two of the Titans.  Then with one guy and two Titans at each end of the field, they would start one tractor down the field, put the self-steering device in the furrow and then hop off and let the Titan go down the field by itself.   After it got about half way down the field, he would start the other Titan down the field behind it.  Now the same thing was being done at the other end of the field. As the tractors get towards the end of the field, the operator at that end hops on, finishes the furrow, turns the Titan around and sends it back down the other way.   And so it goes, the operators just keep sending the tractors back and forth until the field was finished.  Back when these tractors only traveled at 2.5 to 3 MPH, it took a long time to cover the length of some fields.

Gary, those young ladies accomplished a major feat driving across the country but, they didn't have to crank-start that Model T.  That car has a battery and a starter.  The way you can tell is that it doesn't have the kerosene side lights.  Henry figured if a car was equipped with an electrical system, he didn't need to stick those kerosene lights on too.

1302706405_ViolaLaLondeandElizabethVanTuylJune1922crosscountrydriveintheirModelTFordTouringCarIH.jpg.50515f9f151a0685c542c2fc55601e68.thumb.jpg.4ebb4cd0414b3cf5ae07d391423a0a2d.jpg

Roger, you caught me sleeping! I knew that the self starter became an option in 1919. I KNEW if they didn't have kerosene side lamps, they had a self starter and electrical system. I just failed to think. 

One of our favorite trucks has the side lamps and NO electrical system, except the magneto headlights and horn, a classic hand cranker in the electric starter age. And... There is a red IH Tractor on a Montana Farm unloading the oats crop out of the box of it.

You have to admit, those were two gutsy girls! Think of the creeks, rivers, mud holes, rocky outcroppings, etc. they had to deal with on that journey. Gary?

IH 300 lifting out 2019 oats crop from 1925 Model TT Ford to 1953 F-350 8-25-19.jpg

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43 minutes ago, MT Matt said:

  If you want wait a little bit on the A water casting, I’m 99% sure I saw one at the tractor bone yard laying next to a disassembled tractor. I need to go up there this spring after the snow melts to get a manifold for a AC WD-45 I need to get running. I think I might also have a gasoline starter tank for the distillate setup if you want to fill the hole in your hood. Just for looks but something fun on the old girl!

MT Matt, Using my head for something besides a hat rack, why didn't I look at how many bottoms the W-6 was pulling? The Six has the Farmall M engine which will pull three bottoms. And the W-4 had the Farmall H engine which will ONLY pull two bottoms.

You wouldn't have to talk to hard to get me to NOT work on Tony this spring. That sounds like a winner, rather than trying to weld and seal the old one. And why not fill up the hole in the hood? What a great offer. Let me know what I'll owe you for your efforts and parts, Matt.  Gary?

PS: the MD TA is a rare, valuable tractor. I remembered the dual fuel filters in the photo and forgot to mention any of that. My memory IS slipping.

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7 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

Look at this. Page 900 ?

?

********

The good Lord just made the human body more complicated than needed-------look at the simplicity of Gary's model TT truck.  And it's still running. 

I just came to the kitchen for something sweet and quick to eat.  Blood sugar crashed too low-----not a pleasant feeling.  Sure would be nice to have a set of gauges for a quick review.  I would think:  blood pressure, temperature, blood sugar level, air pressure (breathing) and a tachometer would do for a start.

Sounds like a good project for Roger.  Let me know when you have us a set ready Roger!!!?

And-------off we go into the makings of a body that can stay up with the "new fangled" equipment of today!!!

 

DD

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900 pages! Wow, thats a book or an epic movie series. Thought I'd check in with an up to date picture of the old Red River Special thresher on the hill in my pasture. It looked pretty scenic yesterday morning in thin fog just after the sun came up. 

feb 26 thresher small.jpg

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5 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

?

********

The good Lord just made the human body more complicated than needed-------look at the simplicity of Gary's model TT truck.  And it's still running. 

I just came to the kitchen for something sweet and quick to eat.  Blood sugar crashed too low-----not a pleasant feeling.  Sure would be nice to have a set of gauges for a quick review.  I would think:  blood pressure, temperature, blood sugar level, air pressure (breathing) and a tachometer would do for a start.

Sounds like a good project for Roger.  Let me know when you have us a set ready Roger!!!?

And-------off we go into the makings of a body that can stay up with the "new fangled" equipment of today!!!

 

DD

Hard drive started going a decade ago, RAM is now acting up, growing old ain’t for the faint of heart but it always beats the alternative ?

I contacted Gary on smokestak about at TD18 and invited him over, never thinking this would be the foundation for IH history forever, can’t thank him and all the others enough for their contribution, 1000 pages dead ahead...

 

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Rogers's comments about the Titans and then being self driving reminded me of a plow day. IN Chapter 7 of IHCC held a plow day years ago where the host had a mile long field. It took me right at 45 minutes with either my F-14 or Farmall A, both with mounted plows, to complete one round. That would work out to 2 - 2-1/2 mph. Not bad for old iron but the it gives you respect for modern equipment. 

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13 hours ago, hardtail said:

Hard drive started going a decade ago, RAM is now acting up, growing old ain’t for the faint of heart but it always beats the alternative ?

I contacted Gary on smokestak about at TD18 and invited him over, never thinking this would be the foundation for IH history forever, can’t thank him and all the others enough for their contribution, 1000 pages dead ahead...

 

Hardtail, I remember that time like it was a month ago, when you invited me to post on the Red Power Industrial site about the TD-18As I had. You later told me about the Coffee Shop. (your mistake!) I really hadn't planned all of this, but I've had red paint flowing in my veins forever. Every time I get a cut, I get reminded about IHC equipment I grew up with. Roger calls my site "Blue Smoke" at times. I can express myself behind a keyboard, but have me stand up and try to speak to a small crowd of people and I'm tongue tied.

These had to be some of those first photos of the two TD-18As I had? After all, they were IH Tractors on a Montana Farm!

1615150882_TD-18Aprimedcabtoolbarrodweedersharrows_edited-1.thumb.jpg.f4281bdfbb44364ce98dd3b177422187.jpg

1789192629_TD-18AA160truckOopsCrystalLakeRoadGaryYaeger.jpg.946181a7da9f812d1400a3bdc27f2a4b.jpg

1848291438_TD-18ATD-40s-.jpg.98b554dd367a861e83ce5d961e3ff23c.jpg

1971039055_TD-18A-medozing2_edited-1.jpg.504796bfd405397289f523c3b8eabc84.jpg

My late brother Bill, on the other hand, fed news to 48 radio stations west of the Mississippi River. Give him a hot mike and he was all ready to blow blue smoke. He was even offered a full time position with ABC National News. He just didn't want to go to Vietnam, just to be able to say he worked for them.

Bill at KALL Radio Station in Salt Lake City, Utah when Bureau Chief for the Intermountain Radio Network, known then as IMN.

1034990217_BillYaegerIMNMontanaNews.thumb.jpg.b993a3768bb35e69479a3fe968c81298.jpg

Bill was a darn hard act for me to follow. As a result, in high school, I acted up, because I couldn't measure up to him in my parent's eyes. Bill and I always remained friends though. I've long forgiven my parents for the frustration I caused them. Bill and I loved making music together from a young age. This was January 1, 1952, the day Hank Williams died. We were making music at an aunt and uncle's place.

719578254_GaryonBanjoBillYaegeronaccordionin1-1-1952.jpg.73886a06b2d3ca23e3facdad3729af80.jpg

He was assistant Adjutant General of Montana after 37 years of service, a Brigadier General and a Master Aviator. Gary?

876504872_GeneralBillYaeger.thumb.jpg.2052da5b849d2facc43081dd6a4e967c.jpg

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Public speaking:  I remember the first time I ever spoke in front of a large crowd. I was asked on “youth Sunday” to give the communion meditation at church. (Christian church that partakes in communion every Sunday) Youth Sunday came once a quarter. I was in fourth or fifth grade probably. I had come up with a meditation and prayer to follow. Once I got up there and behind the pulpit I lost my place in my Bible. I was embarrassed but found it after a few seconds (seemed like 30 minutes to me) I went on and no souls were harmed at my hands that day. On my way out after church an older gentlemen I knew came up and grabbed me. He said to me “don’t ever worry about a pause like that when you are speaking, it just causes everyone to pay attention to you”.  Luckily, I’ve never been bothered to speak to a crowd and later went on to compete in public speaking through 4H and later the Farm Bureau. I feel like what that gentleman told me that day was a vital part of that. So, Gary, don’t ever feel bad if you say you couldn’t speak to a crowd in person. Your written word has been undoubtably successful on many stages at many levels. 

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Yes Gary those were the pics that got me salivating then I think you commented that you recovered a 181 series that had thrown a track, can’t recall if the cost was free? The blood and sweat to get it out certainly wasn’t, the 18A is the real cherry, the jewel is someone captured this as photos weren’t common then and getting to see this described as it was in real time period use❤️

SH I wonder how people will handle public speaking in the future with all the technology in society, I have heard others comment on how 4H helped, worked with a fellow years ago that floored me on how good he did and was the last one you would have expected, I had to emcee the school graduation when I was in grade 11 and I definitely didn’t look forward to the event, my job now has caused me to encounter this often the challenge now is to talk at their level and try and stimulate thought, interest and engage your audience 

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Sledgehammer and hardtail, I admire your abilities to do that. I was only in 4H one year, my 8th grade year. Of course I had to give a "demonstration and talk," so I cleaned up an old oil bath air cleaner in gasoline and had it disassembled at the meeting. I don't think it took me two minutes to reassemble it and finish my "talk."

Todd, I have done music in church many times. I had no problem hiding behind an instrument. And, occasionally I did stand and give my testimony. I did have those down pat. Strangely, you reminded me of a joke. Son Mike's late father in-law was a Lutheran pastor. He loved telling jokes...

A pastor was having "children's church" at the front of the congregation. He was asking the children questions and they were having a great time as kids do answering him. Then he asked the kids, "Who can tell me what the resurrection is?" The kids were stumped, looking at each other with no answer. Then finally, one little boy said, "I don't know what it is?... but you're supposed to call a doctor after three hours, if it doesn't go away."   Gary?

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Doctor required to pry smile off Mommies face?, kids had never seen it?, even hubby thought it had been a decade or more...

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I have so many favourites on this thread, real time period pics, a Dualled up WD9 on a harrow, 1256 finished plowing snow, a 4568? moving a house, and a pic a few pages back of a 37 wrecker outstanding deco styling that should inspire designers today, thank you for your incredible contribution 

I can recall riding on the neighbours farmhand with their kids in the yard like our personal amusement park, looked pretty high as a little kid, I still have one on a dead W6 in the bush that would have been real handy putting up roof trusses building the shop

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Here’s a little more red iron for your thread Gary! 

94BD4B24-32D5-4C95-BDB5-C5DD8F0232CB.thumb.jpeg.795a963b37794fbf26e2fceb808daf03.jpeg

I finished the engine rebuild on my 1953 Super C last night and took her for a drive this morning. Runs like a top!!

F6D511F2-0966-4A62-B5CA-D65EA6972AB5.thumb.jpeg.09bfc69e4e5ef79a8e1f5287b6d18049.jpeg

It was a narrow front (pic from last spring) but I bought a parts tractor last fall that looked like it had been mashed under a fallen building with a wide front for $150. The parts tractor also had a new clutch as well as larger 3 1/4” high domed pistons/sleeves with very little wear.  So that saved me a little money.

It wasn’t without a little trouble though. I had the block hot tanked at the local machine shop so I took out the oil galley plugs beforehand. And I thought I put them back in the right places. Nope...

04E16869-6C32-4897-93EF-E79DDCA4EB5B.thumb.jpeg.b7acf2b89a867bfdfdd247b902997161.jpeg

When I wanted to install the oil pressure gauge I found my mistake, why I put a plug there is beyond me. So there’s two choices, front or back of the block. And of course the motor was installed in the tractor with the front end on. So I split the back side of the motor, nope that plug was there. Off came the front end down to the camshaft. Luckily the holes in the gear allowed for access to the hole. 

923D521A-A67D-4D30-BFA6-018A5AE728C7.thumb.jpeg.45c06c3bc9497353ccb205e6a0d678f4.jpeg

So a nice shiny painted plug is in the right place, lesson learned and only a couple hours of wasted time. ??

Just have to finish a few little odds and ends, have to figure out the charging system. It’s still 6 volt and if the battery wasn’t fairly new, I’d switch it over to 12 volt. But she will be a nice rake tractor this summer!

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Quote

A pastor was having "children's church" at the front of the congregation. He was asking the children questions and they were having a great time as kids do answering him. Then he asked the kids, "Who can tell me what the resurrection is?" The kids were stumped, looking at each other with no answer. Then finally, one little boy said, "I don't know what it is?... but you're supposed to call a doctor after three hours, if it doesn't go away."   Gary?

True story following up on on the little blue pill joke above.

A doctor had given one of my buddies a Viagra sample back when they were first placed it on the market.  The story going  around was if the "resurrection" lasted longer than 4 hrs to call the doctor.

My friend asked the doctor what he should do if this thing lasted beyond the 4 hrs.

Doc's reply:  take a picture of it------Phyzser would pay big $$$$$ for the picture for future advertising!!!?

 

 

DD

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On 3/2/2021 at 1:06 PM, MT Matt said:

Here’s a little more red iron for your thread Gary! 

94BD4B24-32D5-4C95-BDB5-C5DD8F0232CB.thumb.jpeg.795a963b37794fbf26e2fceb808daf03.jpeg

I finished the engine rebuild on my 1953 Super C last night and took her for a drive this morning. Runs like a top!!

F6D511F2-0966-4A62-B5CA-D65EA6972AB5.thumb.jpeg.09bfc69e4e5ef79a8e1f5287b6d18049.jpeg

It was a narrow front (pic from last spring) but I bought a parts tractor last fall that looked like it had been mashed under a fallen building with a wide front for $150. The parts tractor also had a new clutch as well as larger 3 1/4” high domed pistons/sleeves with very little wear.  So that saved me a little money.

It wasn’t without a little trouble though. I had the block hot tanked at the local machine shop so I took out the oil galley plugs beforehand. And I thought I put them back in the right places. Nope...

Just have to finish a few little odds and ends, have to figure out the charging system. It’s still 6 volt and if the battery wasn’t fairly new, I’d switch it over to 12 volt. But she will be a nice rake tractor this summer!

Matt, that is sure a neat looking Super C you have! You envied what I paid for my IH Farmall A "Tony"! Well I'm just as envious about your Super C! I've wanted on since I was about 10 years old. Not enough to go buy one though! I don't need another tractor. I remember sitting on the first Farmall C that Bourke Motor & Implement got in. I felt right at home on it. Dad didn't take my strong hints, and buy it though.

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I dunno------I do have a friend up in the  great state of Montana who "somehow" acquired one of those prestigious blue Phyzer (Physer?) wrist watches.

I never found the exact criteria for acquiring one of these blue watches--------but it was explained to me by several knowledgeable people that the blue watch was somewhat hard to come by.

Anybody got anymore information???  Roger has he ever confided any details to you???

******

And------Gary you probably need to fill us in again on obtaining the TD-18A with the thrown track.

I rescued 3 or 4 TD-14 and 14A's thru the years for my parts department using my rollback and winch along with my live one for pushing and shoving.  Still have one sitting out back.

A dead crawler of any size is a heavy piece of iron!!!!!  They will make a man out of you in a hurry.?

 

DD

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I'm sitting here thinking about "Ramblin'!" Maybe one reason I do this is I "talk" with my hands. I'm 1/4 Italian, so operating a keyboard keeps me from waving my arms and knocking the monitor and my lamp over!

This is an Advance steam engine chopping corn. The men didn't mind stopping working when the ladies showed up!

518095993_AdvanceenginethreshinginbarnyardladiescrewposingIHRobScrogham.jpg.3fd15492d2e501fbc6f63050a6f6e2c8.jpg

Here is the business end of the chopping corn crew.

1042648475_CornShellerwithblowerintobarnhayloftAdvanceenginepoweringRogScroghamIH.jpg.8b6d7e3ecdd80218c621683eea953dd1.jpg

This was a corn crop on an eastern Montana homestead during the Dirty Thirties. The grasshoppers devastated it. I always figured we couldn't raise corn in Montana anyway.

1578001247_CorncropwitheredbyheatandchewedbygrasshoppersnearTerryMontanaIH.jpg.43c178fe3041b0034c0a9fbd53f8c175.jpg

This is a couple of eastern Montana homesteaders in the field with horses.

922963288_HomesteadersfarmersnearArcherinSheridanCountyMontanaIH.thumb.jpg.3b966b870191776d2491def3c6cd2c9e.jpg

This was a typical eastern Montana town in flatland, homesteading country. Of course it has a 1926 Model T Ford Coupe parked there with a full trunk. It looks like the other vehicles parked there are picking up supplies and maybe having a CocaCola to drink? Or maybe a Schlitz?

782888115_1926ModelTCoupewith21tiresFarmersinFairfieldMontanashopping.jpg.0cfd277580d9ab78a216df981332ace5.jpg

Here is a 10-20 McCormick-Deering pulling a spud digger! One of you experts tell me why there are so many spokes in that extension rim???

183964563_IHC10-20McCormick-DeeringdiggingpotatoesDavidFuller.jpg.3d4819324ea2a34cced2602e173945a0.jpg

Here is a 10-20 McCormick-Deering pulling a McCormick binder in the grain field.

761655214_10-20McCormickDeeringIHCpullingagrainbinderinthefieldDavidFuller.thumb.jpg.ac9b0de92751b4afe91cb28521ecb8bb.jpg

I don't know what this German tractor is pulling this binder in "the old country"?

1144401361_UnknowntractorpullingabinderinGermanyAugust201914DavidFullerIH.jpg.341dd9aabb9195e6cfeda23bc40e8fb6.jpg

When I first saw it, I was going to call it a Universal (below), like Anson's. But, it's not.

1081026228_ManplowingwithaMolineUniversalDavidFullerIH.jpg.a0ab023ecad35f1bf972a039ef782878.jpg

Anson would likely know what these "dinosaur ribs" are, from living in the Delta? This was North Alabama steamboat sunk on the Missouri River in South Dakota where it hit a snag. The snag is still there too. It's only shown up a couple times, in a drought and low water.

18695197_NorthAlabamasteamboatsankintheMissouriRiverbetweenVermillionandYanktonSouthDakotaalmost150yearsagoBWIH.jpg.1a69751eacbf6ad24ca1d725af7ed1c0.jpg

I think this is an International Harvester Titan "flamin' four" isn't it Roger? Stack threshing next to a barn. I'll bet they're blowing the straw into the barn?

1600507104_IHCTitanflamingfourstackthreshingatabarninfarmyardebay_edited-1.jpg.9e23ecdfe3afd75b3cecce2df405889d.jpg

Without getting out my book I'm going to say this is an IHC upright Famous or Titan? Again, Roger will straighten me out!

1311275805_ManreadytocrankhisIHC(Famousmaybeupright)hitmissengineDavidFuller.thumb.jpg.bf488670ae8e88775d39e2ccd170818a.jpg

This photo has me curious. A Fordson tractor, a Model T Ford Coupe, some kind of buggy in the corner (maybe) and a large touring car. I don't know what, but I'd speculate on a Lincoln Touring Car? At a dealership, I'd guess?

776412828_FordsontractorModelTFordCoupefourmenandmaybeaLincolnTouringCarautomobiledealershipDavidFullerIH.thumb.jpg.1279688610ed1bf9987c0f692e683eeb.jpg

I don't know what brand of implement dealership this was at Mellette, South Dakota in 1894? It's obvious they had a good market for moldboard plows though!

1139845773_MachinerydealershipinMelletteSouthDakota1894IH.thumb.jpg.58122619d421357a4df3e65d8957cfde.jpg

This is an International "shovel nose" logging truck with hard rubber tires.

1754097963_IHCInternationalHarvestershovelnosetruckhaulingabiglogtothesawmillDavidFuller.jpg.be5f646241b7da820edab7052578d382.jpg

This is a 10-20 McCormick Deering threshing in South Dakota in the mid-1930s.

1933737574_10-20IHCMcCormick-DeeringthreshingonErnestHehnfarmGackleNorthDakota.jpg.011f42f7ee9841267e2d146b3dccfc66.jpg

This is the McCormick-Deering threshing machine the 10-20 was powering.

748461542_MenpitchingbundlesfromtheirwagonsintothethreshingmachinefeederIHCErnestHehnfarmGackleNorthDakota.jpg.34526ba20b5b71d2a9f378b119aaa0df.jpg

I'm not sure which truck was under the grain spout? It might be a Dodge? Or a GMC or Chevy??? I don't know? 

264761537_TruckbackedunderIHCMcCormick-DeeringthreshingmachineErnestHehnfarmGackleNorthDakota.jpg.984ca68d0d44b51cbb94c923fa7a9035.jpg

Roger will recognize this Big Four tractor, pulling an elevating grader. He's built many pieces for these tractors, and assembled them too.

566604742_BuildingaroadwithaBig4gastractorpullinganelevatinggraderhorsesinMinnesotaimpIH.jpg.253151b4015af84cbda8d2851d4c2731.jpg

This appears to be a 15 hp tandem compound Case chopping corn, filling the silo.

4163499_15hpCasetandemcompoundchoppingcornfillingsiloebay.thumb.jpg.d16e03cf645a21178501126530188b44.jpg

This is a 20 hp Case tandem compound engine in a South Dakota town.

760503126_20hpCasetandemcompoundpullingwatertankwagonintownebay.thumb.jpg.8ac9c60c7c935129204b9573167e59cc.jpg

Here is a 32 hp Case steam engine moving a house in Lincoln Valley, North Dakota.

1122058432_32hp(110)CaseenginemovingahouseinLincolnValleyNorthDakota.thumb.jpg.eb138d17e836bdc70e40070a2114859e.jpg

This is a rather crude, early steam powered dragline!

1137293889_SteampowereddraglinewithuprightboilerDavidFullerimpIH.thumb.jpg.c730f05a682ee2feb1dea3c983dc7786.jpg

Last but not least is MT Matt's IH Farmall Super C, again. It's tonight's IH Tractor on a Montana Farm! Gary?

431914437_MattEisenbachersIHFarmallSuperC.thumb.jpeg.dfdda5ca8c7439da62792f0ed82331c2.jpeg

 

10-20 IHC McCormick-Deering threshing on Ernest Hehn farm,  Gackle, North Dakota.jpg

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1 hour ago, Old Binder Guy said:

Matt, that is sure a neat looking Super C you have! You envied what I paid for my IH Farmall A "Tony"! Well I'm just as envious about your Super C! I've wanted on since I was about 10 years old. Not enough to go buy one though! I don't need another tractor. I remember sitting on the first Farmall C that Bourke Motor & Implement got in. I felt right at home on it. Dad didn't take my strong hints, and buy it though.

Who ever said anything about “need”?  ? When the right deal falls into your lap, “want” always wins out.

And yes, I’ll always be envious of a free tractor!!

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12 minutes ago, Delta Dirt said:

I dunno------I do have a friend up in the  great state of Montana who "somehow" acquired one of those prestigious blue Phyzer (Physer?) wrist watches.

I never found the exact criteria for acquiring one of these blue watches--------but it was explained to me by several knowledgeable people that the blue watch was somewhat hard to come by.

Anybody got anymore information???  Roger has he ever confided any details to you???

******

And------Gary you probably need to fill us in again on obtaining the TD-18A with the thrown track.

I rescued 3 or 4 TD-14 and 14A's thru the years for my parts department using my rollback and winch along with my live one for pushing and shoving.  Still have one sitting out back.

A dead crawler of any size is a heavy piece of iron!!!!!  They will make a man out of you in a hurry.?

 

DD

Anson, you're going to have to eat your heart out about my blue face Pfizer wrist watch! I explained it word for word about 200 pages back. You'll have to find it out there! I've not told Roger.

1218501437_WatchcollectionwatchespocketwristHamiltonred.thumb.jpg.3149af14236f25bde6d4f17ac9325f28.jpg

And, Anson... Why did you tell your last story in "the third person" about a "friend and doctor." You can admit that was you accepting Doc's free sample, then sending a photo of your prize to Pfizer for future advertising of theirs. You didn't say what day of the week that was, Anson??

The Resurrection happened on a Sunday, you know... That was the day our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ arose from the dead.

This was a few years before we tackled putting the tracks back on the TD-18A. We're posing with our dad's McCormick 123 SP combine.

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The 1955 TD-18A was on a hillside at Belt, Montana. The owner had dozed some, but got it sideways and threw a track to the inside. When I bought it, my last living younger cousin James wanted to help retrieve it and I was willing to let him. We took a piece of railroad rail longer than the inside width of the rails. We had a torch, air compressor, enough tools to overhaul it, gasoline, diesel fuel. You name it, we had it. We torched the railroad rail to the correct measurement and put it between the rails. It had set long enough the starting valves were stuck, so I pulled the mufflers, hood and valve cover. I think I used WD-40 on the valves and tapped them with a mallet until they all bounced freely, then reassembled it. After starting it, I would pull it ahead with the railroad iron in place. I was sort of abusive with the clutch, but inch by inch we worked it back into place, then tightened the tracks. At this age, it hurts just thinking about it and telling you, Anson! But I think that was 46 years ago, when I still "had it!"  Gary?

1055607236_TD-18A181MIkeShelldozerIH.jpg.7d88daeb080274118e7b5366ed187711.jpg

 

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Professor-----

I never surmised that "you" might be the friend in Montana I was thinking about.

Hopefully-----someday you will feel like sharing the watch story amongst the "close knit old codgers" forum.  Trust us-----we are all friends.

My story on the little blue pill-----is they definitely must work.  I accidentally dropped one in my ear years ago and its have been harder and harder to hear since!!!!?

(that's my story and I am sticking with it!!!)?

******

Neat trick on using the railroad iron on pushing the TD-18 track back in place.  Railroad track ain't light and easy to handle either!!!!

 

DD

 

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Here in the Mid-West, the term "Corn Copping" wasn't used much.  That Advance steamer is powering a corn shredder.  A corn shredder takes the corn bundle (like a grain shock except a heII of a lot heavier) and removes the ear of corn and shreds/blows the rest of the bundle out the back.  Sometimes the shredded material was used as bedding of livestock or as a feed supplement.

Here is an example of steam powered corn SHREDDING: 

Later in the post there is a photo of a Case steamer filling silo.  I never heard that term used, but I guess that could be called "chopping"  because the whole bundle is cut into small pieces before being blowing up into the silo.

This is a silo filler powered by a John Deere(just try to ignore that segment) and a steam engine: 

The wheel with the extra spokes on the McCormick Deering is called a "Contractor" wheel.  It was offered as an option on 10-20s, 15-30s, 18-36s and I think the WK-40s. 

The IHC tractor doing the stack thrashing is a 30-60 Titan.  Below is a video of the one Wendell Kelch restored and owns.  It was once belong to Oscar Cook who had the great old iron collection out in Gary's country.  

The shovel nose International truck with the log appears to be a Model G.  These trucks used the same engine as the 8-16 International tractor.

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