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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


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Thankfully they always chose to roost in the largest valley oaks around. The one ranch had a number of trees with tin around the butt about 10 foot off the ground to keep racoons from climbing up on them at night. Some years the hens would have big broods and have close to a 100 in spring. But always get thinned out in a year to maybe 20 to 30 of them.

Did have one come down canyon 2 miles and roosted with the wild turkey's. I don't remember him calling out in the night,? but I slept sounder back then too. He stayed almost 2 years because he dropped tail feather 2 times for the kids to gather them up.  

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When I arrived at Silver Creek this morning, Son Mike was finishing mowing meadow grass down by the barley field. It will be hay for Heather's goats. He was just finishing up and brought the Farmall F

A little background on the 1917 Acme truck.  I got it from the VanHorn Truck Museum in exchange for a bunch of work I did for them back in 1997.  I was a typical museum vehicle,  painted up but not op

Here’s a little more red iron for your thread Gary!  I finished the engine rebuild on my 1953 Super C last night and took her for a drive this morning. Runs like a top!! It was a

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On 1/21/2021 at 7:24 AM, Roger Byrne said:

Thanks for the great information U-C!!  That's more information than is shown in the few books that talk about those trucks.  The reference books do say the first Saurer were built in 1903 and it's great that first one survives.  The so called "American Saurer" production is shown as being from 1911 to 1918.  That first Saurer is a totally different design than the 1912 version that was built in this country.   It would be interesting to know if the 1912 versions in Switzerland used the same components as the American built truck.  It could also be that the American version was just assembled in this country from the Swiss manufactured parts.  I know when I worked on it, the drive train was nothing like any of the other American trucks I've worked on.  That's one thing about a forum like this, you get the benefit of knowledge from people from all over the world.  I'll update my notes on the Saurer Company and pass the info on to Lloyd and a bunch of other old truck guys.   Thanks again for the corrections and updated information.

I think they where the same models around 1912 and I reckon when they setup shop in the US they did ship the parts over from the Swiss plant and later made them inhouse but I could be wrong though. Saurer also had a plant in Germany which became the MAN company later. Between 1904 and 1908 Saurer introduced the world's first truck with a Engine break (something still on trucks today), airstarter and in 1908 developed with Rudolf Diesel the First Diesel engine for a vehicle. Some times I wonder if they would be still in the Truck business if the Managers listened to the Engineers about improving the cab, everthing else was up to date. And a joint venture with Mercedes Benz truck divison which at that time they out right refused ... Swiss irogance in one way to put it, later they did sell out to Mercedes in the end because that company already owned the other major Swiss Truck manufacture FBW. 

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Something I found on Facebook, Montana Cowgirls Clyde Lindsay, Mildred Douglas and Ruby Dickey in Miles City in 1917

2084670755_Montanacowgirls.jpg.2e1cdae172477a3962eaddb3d0fbe9d4.jpg 

 

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22 minutes ago, MT Matt said:

And two look like they have a bull whip around their wrists. Maybe the extra hat is from the cowboy she just got done whipping???  ???

Maybe “the beatings will continue until morale improves”?  Spurs might hurt just as much....

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Those Miles City cowgirls had a great teacher. Calamity Jane had her picture taken while in Miles City, teaching those girls.

232680691_ClamityJaneinMilesCityMontana1882GaryC.thumb.jpg.614a7399767504167edbe56a683b6ca6.jpg

This was Calamity Jane in her working clothes in the Lewistown area.

1383098044_CalamityJanehorseandHighwallWinchesteratUticaMt1897.jpg.828b4f980ad3e937eac7461629ece279.jpg

You didn't give no crap to these tough Miles City "cattle country" women.

377554375_MilesCityCowgirlsGaryCoffrin.jpg.298107c90613c6f189a1b2cd6d35351f.jpg

That extra hat was for the guy they would bury after they were done with him. Or MT Matt could be correct as well? They kept it as a souvenir of the last tough guy they just dismantled?!! These girls keep this John Wayne "Pilgrim" brand toilet paper in their outhouse. "It's rough, it's tough, and it don't take crap off of nobody..."

589694586_JohnWaynesPilgrimbrandtoiletpaperonroller7-3-18.thumb.jpg.be16e71de63e8676c26b9d0f0aa0275b.jpg

Speaking of cattle country (Miles City claims that title. Their radio station is KATL!) Those girls got their little brothers out of the house (fancy one too!) to ride steers, rope calves and brand. By the way, Liberal Facebook covered this photo because of its gruesomeness. Those wimps have never been on a ranch, obviously.

1592252753_SouthDakotaHomesteadersonsbrandingcalfropingfromsteerssoddyshackIH.thumb.jpg.4fd6cb01c5e2c7d68eb21907563271a1.jpg

Those girls can overhaul one of these IHC Mogul Type (B? or C?) tractors blindfolded.

510427407_MogulIHChaulinggraintotheelevatorinViborgSouthDakota.jpg.37146fe31a2249a56df2a9d12c8e72e0.jpgA postcard of an IHC Mogul Type B? hauling sand. at Andover, South Dakota.

244644031_HaulingSandwithanInternationalHarvesterIHCgastractoratAndoverSouthDakota.jpg.a815eef7db7f6cdeff445e092887836a.jpg

This 10-20 IHC Mogul is shelling corn, at least that is what it said on Facebook.

1771641998_10-20IHCMogultractorshellingcorninSouthDakota.thumb.jpg.7b98cf75b1d64ea161340f022c1506e7.jpg

This guy is plowing with his 10-20 Mogul. They were a "three-bottom tractor."

1332840400_IHC10-20MogultractorpullingplowsteeringdeviceinSouthDakota.jpg.02f18244c3cc14d67c9653fde063b124.jpg

Here the farmer is lifting the steering guide out of the furrow.

1593893545_SouthDakotaFarmeronhis10-20IHCMogulplowingusingasteeringguide1918.thumb.jpg.1bdbc6304a8764d7276e4b5653f64137.jpg

I found this photo of a 10-20 McCormick Deering pulling one of their combines. Notice the lady operators! I've posted a photo before of my dad doing this very same thing, except with a 15-30.

1000023484_10-20McCormick-DeeringIHCtractorpullingaMcCormickCombinecuttinggraininfieldgirldrivingDavidFuller.jpg.fd73c54f5d96b68cee813a2f9c5e8227.jpg

This photo seems to have been taken at a fair. An IHC dealer showing a farmer his mounted cultivator on a Farmall F-12.

1472552361_IHCFarmallF-12withamountedcultivatoratafairordisplayDavidFuller.jpg.907ce31559f69c9f8ce7d2cb949d92ad.jpg

A farmer with teams pulling a McCormick Binder in the grainfield.

74124716_SouthDakotaFarmeronhisIHMcCormickBindercuttinggrainwithfourhorses.thumb.jpg.d9e54145f2ebfa8d12caeb2eb332c90c.jpg

This farm family went to town and bought a brand new Farmall H in 1939. You can tell the oldest son wants to be first to farm with it! This would be one of our Farmall H, Annie's sisters!

1763016407_FarmFamilybuysabrandnewIHCFarmallHin1939imp.jpg.db636c1bc80a4be0098c6f57724c2167.jpg

This farmer stopped his Farmall M and combine to eat a quick lunch during harvest. I did plenty of this in my days on the farm. I don't think my wife brought it to the field in a dress though?

1523742268_WifeandchildrenbringfieldfoodtodadcombiningwithFarmallHIH.thumb.jpg.c8aeeb616249264d7daaabfdfcdff6d6.jpg

A KB5 IH truck, two Farmall H and two Farmall M tractors ready to get to work!

892541252_IHK-5truckandFarmalltractorsLoganvilleWisconsingettingfieldsreadyforplantingonDorrowfarm.thumb.jpg.e7fc5f9f9a8733bdbbf852285b39ecfc.jpg

This Six Speed Special IHC truck lives at a gravel crushing site.

102628471_IHC6SixSpeedSpecialtrucknearacrusherplantDavidFuller.jpg.adb279a116946811ca7bf66f5f14940e.jpg

At first I thought this farmer's wife was posing beside his D-40, but I think it is a KB7?247905164_WomanposingwithherhusbandsIHtruckD-30orKB-6.thumb.jpg.d55e0f206516cefe843874c636dd7dd9.jpg

Maybe U-C Urs, or Roger can figure this one out? Is it a wood gasification tractor or is it a foreign steam tractor? The brand is Ivel. It is pulling a binder, and the whole family seems "taken" by it.

851815296_IvensteamorgasenginepullingabinderIH.thumb.jpg.71d387604ae277712f4f424570f1abdc.jpg

Last but not least, my great grandson, Colt, is sitting on his great, great grandad's 1939 IH Farmall H at Silver Creek last August. A mate to the new 1939 Farmall H above, the farm family is posing with. Only Annie is an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm!  Gary?

443728639_ColtSummerssittingonIHFarmallHAnnie8-14-2020.thumb.jpg.7ce5c392b6d3b9d601c4c3eb6e7dd137.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Lunch in the field:

Brought up memories from back in the early 80's.

I had a small 30 ac field of new ground (recently cleared) that invariably was the last field to get planted.  And for several years seems like I planted it on July 4th.

I would let the my labor off and plant this field myself.  My wife and children would bring a watermelon out and we would have a picnic lunch out of the back of her station wagon.

The children named it the 4th of July field!!?

(the 18% interest meter ran 7 days per week/24 hrs per day------so, so did I;  as if I could out run the basturd)   Note----I did get poor enuff to "retire" from farming in 1985.

nickel cotton-----50 cent meat;   how in the hel! can a poor man eat??

 

DD

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4 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

Lunch in the field:

Brought up memories from back in the early 80's.

I had a small 30 ac field of new ground (recently cleared) that invariably was the last field to get planted.  And for several years seems like I planted it on July 4th.

I would let the my labor off and plant this field myself.  My wife and children would bring a watermelon out and we would have a picnic lunch out of the back of her station wagon.

The children named it the 4th of July field!!?

(the 18% interest meter ran 7 days per week/24 hrs per day------so, so did I;  as if I could out run the basturd)   Note----I did get poor enuff to "retire" from farming in 1985.

nickel cotton-----50 cent meat;   how in the hel! can a poor man eat??

 

DD

Anson, You and I have talked about that 18%+ interest meter running as we worked, as we slept, and as we wept. You lasted longer than I did. Grandpa's homestead was in the family 101 years when I finally got the place sold, so as to "get my neck out of the noose." I paid every nickel back to the bank I owed. I couldn't have found a worse time to take on another lease, larger equipment, since I'd more than doubled the acreage to be farmed. I had two crop fizzles (failures) in succession. The peanut farmer president does great things for Habitat For Humanity, but he didn't know squat about being a president for farmers. The Russian Wheat Embargo, the Longshoreman's strike (refusing to load grain into ships) and that interest rate was taking me under. And I was having to go down with the ship. The Good Lord got my neck out of that noose, and it wasn't easy, but I'm still here today writing about red tractors on Montana farms. Speaking of IH Tractors on a Montana Farm, here they were. I think this was 1980? Gary?

159283401_4568120635yearsago.seedingcornbinder.thumb.jpg.af25315c682adf99e99bc46f5955802d.jpg

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On 1/25/2021 at 2:41 PM, Old Binder Guy said:

 

Maybe U-C Urs, or Roger can figure this one out? Is it a wood gasification tractor or is it a foreign steam tractor? The brand is Iven. It is pulling a binder, and the whole family seems "taken" by it.

851815296_IvensteamorgasenginepullingabinderIH.thumb.jpg.71d387604ae277712f4f424570f1abdc.jpg

 

 

Hi Gary that tractor is a Ivel it was a British build small tractor build around 1902, I think it was even the world's first small tractor ever made. 

medium_B510328.jpg

 

Here are pics I have found on FB tractors with wood gazifiers: Motrac and Buhrer tractors

Ist möglicherweise ein Schwarz-Weiß-Bild von eine oder mehrere Personen

Ist möglicherweise ein Bild von Fahrzeug

Keine Fotobeschreibung verfügbar.

Ist möglicherweise ein Bild von Fahrzeug

Ist möglicherweise ein Bild von Text „RESTAURANT WINDEGG AUSSICHTSTERASSE BURESTUBE Bes ehr Baumann“

 

-Urs

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 Urs, I was wondering why the one pulling the binder I posted had that stove pipe, beside the driver? That's what made me wonder if it was a gasifier or steam tractor.  Gary?

 

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Gary------you might should keep Mike's Steamers on standby.  Looks like Biden is swinging the axe on the oil industry (and all fossil fuels).

I am hoping Roger goes ahead and converts the mighty AutoWagon to full electric drive before I pick it up.?

Maybe you should convert the Model T  ??

 

DD

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I WAS ASKED to post some information on aging metals to make them look old, so here goes.

Sometimes when I'm restoring old iron, I try to make it look as good or better than new.   There are other times when I restore a piece of mechanical history, I want it to appear just like it came out of the shed after a long useful life . . . let it wear its history like a badge of honor.  Among collectors the term is "leaving them in their work clothes".   Anson had said in the past he likes the "rusty and dusty" look and that's a pretty good description of a "work clothes" tractor.  Over this past year, I've been restoring my 1919 Rumely Oil Pull.   I decided since the tractor was in fair condition visually, that was how I would restore it.  Another factor is that these early Oil Pulls have the a well deserved nickname, an Oil Puke!  If you restore them with a nice paint job, if you run/work the tractor very much, in a few years you will feel you wasted your time on a paint job.   There were lots of problems with my Oil Pull and some of those things needed new castings and fabrications.  After those parts were made, in order to not have them stand out as "new", it was necessary to "age" the parts to match the patina of the tractor.  I'm going to explain a few of the methods I use to give an aged look on cast iron, steel, brass and copper.

The household chemicals I use are regular white table vinegar, table salt and a fresh bottle of regular 3% Hydrogen Peroxide (the stuff you have in your medicine cabinet).  The basic aging/rusting formula is 1 cup of Hydrogen Peroxide with 2 tablespoons of vinegar and 1 tablespoon of table salt.  Put the salt and vinegar in a spray bottle and mix until most of the salt is dissolved and then add the Hydrogen Peroxide and mix again.  In another spray bottle put some of the plain white vinegar.   When doing any of the process I'm describing, you should wear eye protection, rubber gloves and do it in a well ventilated area.  Cast iron is the easiest.  First make sure the piece has no oil or grease on it and is dry.  Give the iron a spray coating of the vinegar and let it dry.  Give it another lite coating of vinegar and let dry.  Now spray the piece with a generous coating of the rusting mixture.  You will see a foaming action on the part.  Leave it sit overnight.   The next day, rinse with hot water and let dry.  To continue the process,  give it a single lite coating of vinegar, let dry, another generous coating of the rusting mixture, leave over night and rinse in hot water.  I've found that cast iron only needs two cycles to do the job but with steel, the aging process may need five cycles to start to get the rust pitting to develop. 

To age brass castings take the clean, oil/grease free, dry piece and suspend it in an airtight container with some household ammonia at the bottom of the container.  DO NOT let the piece make contact with the liquid, it's the fumes that do the work.  I've found that 24 hours in the sealed container seems to do the job.  Wash the piece in hot water and dry.  I then give the item a lite spray coating of just the aging mixture, let it dry and the next day, rinse with hot water.  One cycle usually gets the job done but if you want it darker, just repeat the operation again.

Copper is the easiest to age.  Take the clean, oil/grease free, dry item and give a generous spray coating of the aging mixture and let dry.  Leave it over night and then rinse in hot water.  Just leave it sit for a couple days as it will continue to age.   One shot usually does the job but if you want it darker, just repeat the operation again.

The process of aging galvanized metal is a hazardous operation and I suggest you watch some of the U-Tube demonstrations before trying it.  It consists of using acidic toilet bowl cleaners and needs to be done outside and with good personal protective practices.  I used that process to remove most of the zinc coating when I did the oil tanks below.  After the galvanized coating was sufficiently distressed, I used the steel aging process I described above.

Along with many other things, my Oil Pull needed two gear oiler tanks along with the upper parts of the starting tank/pump unit.  The photo below shows what they are supposed to look like.

post1aComposite.jpg.fd6752d22d939e330030ab3d5a2cbc83.jpg

The photo below shows how I made the Oil Pull's gear oiler tanks using 4" galvanized stove pipe.  It was cut to length, the beads were rolled in and the ends made.  The ends were crimped over, all the seams were soldered and the tank pressure tested for leaks.  I then distressed the galvanized coating and aged the steel using the process I described above.  You can also see what the difference is after aging the brass valve.   I also added a few dents to make it match the rest of the tractor.

post1DSC09679.jpg.87ba1180e485c15a648a8631ddeab413.jpg

post2DSC09690.jpg.211d2155a764a3a02f2a0b57424c90ae.jpg

The top of the starting tank was remade along with fabricating all the upper parts of the fuel pump and piston.  The steel and brass parts were then aged.

post3Dsc09670.thumb.jpg.ba596a25acefc4ab42b3b4d4f286571f.jpg

Below is what they look like on the tractor.  The copper hasn't been aged yet, I'll do that in the spring when its warmer.

post6DSC09711.thumb.jpg.52cf53038455dbbb8cdc67df4a25a1be.jpg

post10DSC09715.thumb.jpg.be4369608b3fef09362c9e44d264a9f1.jpg

After the tractor runs a while later this year and these parts get sprayed with oil and covered with dirt, they should be a good match to the rest of the tractor.  Below is the Rumely as it looked in November before we got snow.   Anson's favorite condition:  "Rusty and Dusty" and considering it's an Oil Pull, add "greasy" too.

halfDsc09609.thumb.jpg.7868c2376ff2bb646a160acfc9757ebd.jpg

halfDsc09607.thumb.jpg.3432991d7a8b68a395be0aa1e24bcf0a.jpg

Before someone makes the comment . . . YES, it would be a heII of a lot easier to just paint the damn part!

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This is a poor photo, but as good as I could get, of the back cover of the Hamilton electric watch Dad was presented when he was a "past master" of a masonic lodge in Lewistown in 1960. I knew the old boy who did this engraving. He did engraving for a sports trophy company and a jewelry store in Lewistown. This old boy had the FBI stop by to "visit" him every year, or so. No plan for their arrival, just an on the spot checkup. They checked on him as he did "quality enough work" that he could engrave plates to counterfeit US Currency.

1259881507_DadJoeYaegers1960presentedMasonicPastMasterHamiltonWatchengravedback.thumb.jpg.f1ff79b541c61d8df908f4bc62fee4d3.jpg

Well, Roger, you'd better watch out. The FBI will stop in to your shop, should they see your post above. It is obvious you are a master counterfeiter! Anson and I won't say a word though. Hopefully there aren't any FBI agents who own IH tractors and are on this forum. If they are, hopefully they don't stop by this ridiculous site I started a few years ago.  Gary? 

PS: Thank you so much for sharing your recipes, Roger! I'm sure I'm not the only one who will copy them.

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?--------its taken me my lifetime to get my "junk" into that rusty/dusty stage.  And now I find out Roger can do it overnight!!!

Makes me feel like I have wasted 77 yrs of my time.

Looks good Roger.?

 

DD

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Anson, your rust has history to it, the stuff I'm doing is just trying to somewhat match that historic stuff.  A 102 year old "work clothes" tractor just doesn't look right with a bunch of shiny new parts.  There's another way I've used when I'm not in a hurry to make parts rusty.   I sandblast the part and just place it outside on the north side of a building during the warm part of the year and let nature take its course.  I make sure the ground around it is damp most of the time and occasionally give it a shot of the rusting mixture.  If you have time, this works great and gives a better/deeper patina (aka RUST) than the method I described above.  The main reason I did the "hurry up" process on the Rumely parts has to do with its "Oil Puke" nature.  If I mounted them on the tractor without aging them, not only would they look new and out of place, but the oil tossed off the engine would prevented them from rusting the natural way.  In the photo below, the exhaust manifold and all the preheater parts are new machined castings.  The manifold gets hot enough to burn off the oil but the carburetor heater parts above above it, get sprayed with oil every time the engine starts.  Had I not aged those parts they would appear brand new, not 102 years old.  You will note the angle iron the oil tank is mounted to is coated with oil/grease/dirt.  By the time the summer is over, the oil tank will look the same.  Now if the next caretaker of this tractor wants to make it look like it just came from the factory, they can clean it up, paint it, put on the decals and make it look pretty.  The mechanical work will be finished . . . that is unless I wear it out! smily_ROTFL.gif.3160bc02b5342dac0b19fd1fff37a2b2.gif

RPagedDSC09715.thumb.jpg.6bd1c18ebc06cf8582d2baa728cadb17.jpg

This great looking and running 16-30 Rumely Oil Pull below belongs a friend of mine, Ken Majeski of Ellsworth, Wisconsin.

1530061469_KenM.16-30.thumb.jpg.8074276d16acd6bfe8fb7a90d9314cfd.jpg

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4 minutes ago, Old Binder Guy said:

Roger.... I just noticed the "barn lantern" on the front of your Oilpull.

1702530643_RogersRumelyOilpullleftsiderunning.thumb.jpg.72ef5d5c5f65ea8ddbb2580acadfcd03.jpg

Now I know I have  part of a Rumely Oilpull at Mike's shop!  Gary?

1955358392_BarnLampLanternatshopdoor9-24-2020.thumb.jpg.7b7a2ccdcb7e0a0e7f39fc6d97661698.jpg

The small lens on the front of that “headlight” is known as a Buckeye. It focused the beam farther than standard glass would. I’ve got a lantern that is similar that came from my Mother’s side of the family. I don’t know if it ever had a shroud like the others or not. I looked up the maker at one time and I was able to date mine to the very late 1800’s.  

84B93656-0948-48BD-B5EC-326F3E0E1B96.jpeg

4C0C0570-9370-436A-8306-CEEA2C011AE5.jpeg

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Todd, I love your lantern. It has a narrower "T" top than the barn lantern, I believe? They are built wider.

114924215_BarnLanternonshopwallbydoor12-6-18.thumb.jpg.a38ea980fd7d0c4a6032c96cd9f575ff.jpg

Your style of lantern has "turned my crank" since about 9 years old. All of the old western movies, and especially John Wayne movies always seemed to use the old "T" top lanterns, which is what grabbed my crank. I have several of the other type, but prefer the T top ones. There are three at right.

1714863837_Coffeeteapotslanternskerosenegaslampsfryingpansshed3-20-19.thumb.jpg.501dfc2a1db116b3aba05b51874880a0.jpg

I keep one on the Case engine. They were used in the old days, when having to operate an engine after dark, you could keep an eye on the water gauge glass, the most important job of a steam engineer.

2044123600_15hpCaseundercanopyfromrear5-22-15.thumb.jpg.28ae330bf5aad5eb4b81b99a64850574.jpg

And I keep one on the Reeves engine.

542598875_20hpReevesoperatorsdeck8-31-17.thumb.jpg.007674b375c02b64cb7b53363e9351b0.jpg

This is a Hamm kerosene headlight on the Case. I'm not going to put the Rumely Oilpull headlight on the Reeves though. That's Roger's baby! 

477759736_15hpCaseundercanopyfromfront5-22-15.thumb.jpg.821d9e1d41360459d2756eef8d0686c4.jpg

Hamm headlights aren't the brightest things. But they would make it so you wouldn't run into another engine on the road at night. This was just after sundown. I should have waited another half hour to try the headlight. Gary?

363204751_CaseHamheadlight1990sred.jpg.7c744b3c49342f5f04c51ee7330aa1a6.jpg

 

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A bunch more old junk from Facebook to post. I don't know why I'm so fascinated with old farming equipment? This John Deere D may have had its GPS malfunction? Or maybe the touring car had its self driving equipment malfunction? Or maybe they were both talking on their smartphones?

648893056_IHJohnDeereDandtouringcarautomobilesmashcrashneitherwon.jpg.bf1a70decf26dd01b9f285685f089fd4.jpg

Likely that car was set up for Typwriting while driving and taking selfies like our 1925 Model TT Truck is?

1883635791_1925ModelTTTypewriteringdrivingcameraBW_edited-1.thumb.jpg.c8c4a0afd6614bfa20acd13135f92119.jpg

Speaking of trucks, this one is loaded with a neat looking old Twin City tractor set up with extension rims.

2101447065_TwinCityloadeduponhardrubbertiretruckandreadyfordeliveryIH.jpg.f4d871ba91ff0e6193f54894176a4129.jpg

The Silver King assembly line for orphan tractors.

633199024_FactoryphotooftheR44SilverKingtractorsbeingassembledIH.jpg.09f8cf97ffcff2b490e416eadc37dde8.jpg

This is an early Fordson tractor. I was going to ask Roger if these with the "ladder radiator sides" were the earliest type? The only thing I know about Fordsons is they later added fenders, then added fenders with toolboxes, that were designed to keep them from going over backwards.

385581922_EarlyFordsonTractorwithladderradiatorsidesDavidFullerIH.jpg.49dc99a9d4ec919a6d3340fe3a8941a1.jpg

The Fordson used the worm gear differential drive that could make the Fordson roll over on its back. I'd guess that it was seldom a good thing for the operator?

766988504_WreckedFordsonTractorflippedovermaybebackwardscrashedturnedebay.jpg.9b5517a7875b8e3e22fb74f11b4aee1f.jpg 

This is a cute little Fordson that Henry Ford had made for his grandkids.

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An IHC Famous(?) gas engine powers a hay press, baling hay.

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Is this a Type B or Type C IHC tractor, Roger?

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I can't tell which IHC Mogul this is threshing either? Maybe Roger can tell?

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I can identify these though! An IHC 8-16, a 10-20 IHC Titan and an IHC shovel nose truck!

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I didn't even try to identify this tractor, the farmer's wife is sitting on the back end of. Knowing Roger, we'll get an answer.

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I do know this is one of the very first Flour City tractors built by Kinnard. It looks like much interest in watching it grade. Maybe they're all county commissioners from the land of 10,000 lakes?

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I heard from one of Roger's friends that he was going to make one of these combines out of his Rumely Oilpull. This would make it extremely valuable and saleable for his widow.

1223282793_Advance-RumelySelfPropelledCombineatworkinCanadaOilpullDavidFullercropIH.thumb.jpg.1ecb87e6e446e7a6c3fab3481cb47cc6.jpg

Something a little more modern here. Two 930 Case propane tractors set up to pull in tandem. I have a friend who did this to two 930 Case diesel tractors back in the 1960s at Coffee Creek, Montana. He pulled a 24' chisel plow with it (them?).

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Tubacase47's Choteau show grounds has this unusual setup. A WD9 McCormick and an R John Deere.

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A REO Touring Car is chained up to pull a snow "plow" here in Montana a few years back.

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This is an old advertisement for the air cooled Franklin automobiles. A camel can go 8 days without water. A Franklin automobile can go forever without water! I don't think this was a "Shriner's" parade in Grand Forks, North Dakota, either?

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This is a 1905 air cooled Franklin. Judging by the car parked above, this is about what the Franklins would have looked like at the time of the parade.124646845_1905aircooledFranklintouringcar.thumb.jpg.cfc760bdd88cd142f06a7e4efefb5ce0.jpg

I can't find out what "Cajones" are in my Webster's Dictionary, but apparently (according to Facebook) that is who or what drove this big log on this hard rubber truck and trailer, crossing this man made logging bridge. Maybe that is the guy's name? No wonder it isn't in my dictionary!? I'll bet his name was C.A. Jones??

600392150_HardrubbertireloggingtruckhaulsoneHUGElogoveralogbridgetrestleskidroadonhiswaytothesawmillIH.jpg.f78dce81a1d0ada68ae9727e6f27850e.jpgAnd, last but not least is this photo with Mike's IH Farmall M, Toot, in the picture with some of his other equipment. Toot was making some quick firewood at the buzz saw. Toot is an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm!  Gary☺️

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Gary, I dont have nearly the lantern collection that you do but have long been fascinated by them. Seems like they should all have a story to tell.  My latest was a lamp and not a lantern.  The rest have just been gathered up at various places. I like to make sure they all work just in case they are needed in the future for power outages or the “green new deal” ? the RR lanterns work well. Bottom one is a Bluegrass/Belknap branded lantern that would have been made much later.  Maybe if a couple of your tractors above had been outfitted with a “headlight” they wouldn’t have ended up in those accidents?

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1 hour ago, Sledgehammer said:

Gary, I dont have nearly the lantern collection that you do but have long been fascinated by them. Seems like they should all have a story to tell.  My latest was a lamp and not a lantern.  The rest have just been gathered up at various places. I like to make sure they all work just in case they are needed in the future for power outages or the “green new deal” ? the RR lanterns work well. Bottom one is a Bluegrass/Belknap branded lantern that would have been made much later.  Maybe if a couple of your tractors above had been outfitted with a “headlight” they wouldn’t have ended up in those accidents?

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Todd, I have several Aladdin Lamps, but I don't have a single one that works. I think you can still buy the mantle and necessary things to make them work. I do have kerosene lamps that will work.

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The electric lamp with the shade is a "Major National Award." It doesn't operate on kerosene.

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Now, I am thinking of getting this recent one in working order.  Gary ?

1681608076_AladdinLamp3-6-2020.thumb.jpg.6f7d758d65e0b73a0ff493bcef1d5519.jpg

 

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Geezz Gary . . . so many questions! 

Yes the "ladder" radiator sides were on the first series Fordsons 1917 to 1919.

The IHC engine on the baler is a Model M which started production in 1917.

The International tractor with the crew all over it is a Model B.

The IHC tractor seen from the back thrashing is either a Model C Mogul or a Type D Titan.   I can't see enough detail to say which one it is but it appears to be a 25HP version.

The tractor with the gal on the back doesn't look like anything that was built in this country.  Considering the thrasher appears to be the style used in England and Europe, I'm guessing it's a foreign made tractor.

Now a question for OBG and Sledgehammer, that buckeye or bullseye (they are called both), is it part of the glass globe or is it a single glass piece attached to the bottom of the lantern globe mount?

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Gary, I have always liked the sconce style that hang on a wall with the reflector behind the chimney. My Aladdin was in the attic at my Grandfather’s house. I polished it up this winter, added an NOS Kone Kap mantle and with a lot of elbow grease she came back to life.  It sports the original chimney and looks better than I expected it could. Aladdin is still in business today. 

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1 minute ago, Roger Byrne said:

Now a question for you, that buckeye or bullseye (they are called both), is it part of the glass globe or is it a single glass piece attached to the bottom of the lantern globe mount?

Not to interrupt... I know the one on my lantern is all one piece made into the globe.
If it was a separate piece you could potentially tune the beam in somewhat. That would be interesting. 

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