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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


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When I arrived at Silver Creek this morning, Son Mike was finishing mowing meadow grass down by the barley field. It will be hay for Heather's goats. He was just finishing up and brought the Farmall F

A little background on the 1917 Acme truck.  I got it from the VanHorn Truck Museum in exchange for a bunch of work I did for them back in 1997.  I was a typical museum vehicle,  painted up but not op

Here’s a little more red iron for your thread Gary!  I finished the engine rebuild on my 1953 Super C last night and took her for a drive this morning. Runs like a top!! It was a

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Dad had a heavy army overcoat from his time in the service (58ish) I used to wear it out to do the nightly check on the livestock when it was Lambing season. Dont know what ever happened to that old coat. Probably tossed when folks moved in 86. 

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I came upon another old hard rubber tire truck hauling a small steam locomotive. This one is a little Baldwin engine, that apparently is used to this task? The truck resembles a White Motor Company truck, but don't take that to the bank.

1270280703_HardrubbertiretruckhaulingasmallsaddletankBaldwinlocomotiveIH.jpg.862259ced20ac22f8083851e53b4eaa4.jpg

Anson, This is what you need to haul your watermelons from now on. A MA IHC with a caged in back end backed up to the Helena, Montana Post Office.

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Or you could get some chicken wire and make this IHC MW into your watermelon van. You need to get something that presents more of a sure thing, or you'll lose your crops. And the recipe for those seedless watermelon seeds!

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While you're driving an IHC, I think I'll get a Schacht roadster like this one. It just looks sportier, or maybe I should say "sexier?"

1585937247_SchachthighwheelercarautomobileBWNotIHC.jpg.a786faa214d8ab92d4d5348d411805eb.jpg

Speaking of "Sexy," Anson, is this John Deere tractor carrying two strippers! You cotton guys seem to like strippers.

228840137_JohnDeeretractorwithtworowcottonstripperIH.thumb.jpg.1da0088ff02b5eb1c4ba7734e333f0c6.jpg

I don't know if Ralph comes here anymore, but I thought of him when I saw this photo on Fakebook. It shows a big hit & miss, water tower cooled (I'm not smart enough to know if this is an IHC Famous like Ralph's family's engine or not?) turning a threshing machine.

660701938_KentuckyhitmissenginethreshingDavidFullerIH.thumb.jpg.9daacafcd50a39ef6a1ec8dac3eb8d1d.jpg

I sort of like this photo of horses pulling a wooden combined harvester. It reminds me of how mechanized harvest got when these things showed up.

2059070341_HorseteamspullingawoodencombinedharvesterDavidFullerIH.thumb.jpg.b682ac8ef68419964a33bfd9dce36cdb.jpg

This photo took my eye too. This could never be replicated again. Chicago & Northwestern Railroad steam locomotives all lined up on parallel tracks. Well maybe a multi billionaire could replicate it, over time? I guess Kory Anderson did build that 150 hp Case.

548876966_ChicagoNorthWesternRailwaybrandnewclassH4-8-4articulatedsalllinedupforacompanyphotocirca1929DavidFullerIH.jpg.3a134c5762a60bc086a08773a1511e26.jpg

This was a new one for me, but I've never followed Case tractors much. I don't know if it was just these VA Case tractors that had this feature or not?

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Speaking of Case tractors, here is JFK stopping to talk to a farmer on his way to some political event. Riding in a 1960 Pontiac convertible. I'm guessing that is an early swather and not a grain binder behind that Case tractor? The Secret Service seems to be paying attention to Kennedy?

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Here was an unusual sight for me. An IHC F-30 with a wide front end and huge rubber tires up front. It's digging spuds.

1952585292_IHCF-30widefronthugetiresinfieldworkingDavidFuller.jpg.fefab24166f185f2fa95dd7dcf828328.jpg

Here is a farmer who knows where to put his wife. He could just shut the Farmall off and walk away? But, I'm sure he was kind enough to let her down with that F-10 Farmhand. She was smart enough to be behind the push off so he couldn't do that to her!

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Speaking of IH and heights, this is a filming crew in the air filming IH tractors pulling IH balers for one of their advertising demonstrations.

2043546739_TakingamoviefilmofthenewlineforIHCinthehayfield.jpg.83910f69f5d67f12a6a9305c366b632a.jpg

Here's a new one for me! I've never seen a prototype IH 806 like this one that looked so much more like a 560, at least with farmers driving by it on the county gravel road.

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And there are even IH Tractors on a Montana Farm in this photo. Gary?

2083513791_IHFarmallMTootandFarmallHAnnieinshed9-1-2020.thumb.jpg.d9cb6dd5d298d419e4c4f51e4042f6b5.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

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Gary, When I saw your photo of the 460 bailing hay on a football field, I knew I had seen that somewhere before.  Here it says it's from International Harvester World magazine, February 1962, page 22.  Here is a couple of links for some extra photos of the same situation.  
Thanks for posting your neat photos.
Fred
 
991397649_IHFarmall460withpullinga46Tbaler.jpg.ff2c8fd4eae334fc3fb78f0277721738.jpg
 

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Gary posted some great old truck photos above.  The one of a Autowagon backed up to the Post Office is a 1911 Model A with a FACTORY special USPS body that they started selling that year.  Because Autowagons were such a dependable/versatile truck, many were used by the USPS and IHC started to offer a body design that met their needs.

That truck with the small Baldwin locomotive is a Saurer truck built about 1912.   I was lucky enough to help with the restoration of the only American built Saurer truck in existence.  Lloyd Van Horn purchased the truck at an auction up in Alaska where it had been discovered when they were building the pipeline.  The basic chassis and mechanics of the truck were there but no body of any kind and many small parts were missing.  We did a complete tear-down of the truck and a full, very detailed restoration was done.  I did the engine/trany/mechanical rebuilt in my shop while Lloyd and his Grandson, Scott Mineart, built the body and did the rest of the restoration work at the museum.  The engine is a T-head design with dual cams and was built with the first known version of a "Jake Brake".   The Saurer was Lloyd's pride and joy until it was sold at the auction when the museum closed in 2002.  The truck can now be seen in the I-80 Truck Stop Museum at Walcott, Iowa.  Saurer trucks were first built in Switzerland in 1911 and this truck was built in the USA by the newly formed International Motor Company which consisted of the merger of Mack, Hewitt and Saurer.  After a few years, the American company just went under the Mack name.  Saurer trucks were still built over seas until 1956.

826560913_1912SaureratI-80.thumb.jpg.2183f055c8a2aef035ad588806546c80.jpg

346039283_1912Saurer002.jpg.94370d4b344c00b5b857aefea7ef5882.jpg

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Roger, Thank you for you identification of the Saurer truck hauling the little Baldwin steam locomotive.

2026846032_HardrubbertireSaurertruckhaulingasmallsaddletankBaldwinlocomotiveIH.jpg.0726b2391b54cf823d99976e24179158.jpg

And Thank you for posting Lloyd Van Horn's former Saurer truck as well.

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I'm posting a photo of a White Motor Truck front end to show how I was thinking that loco hauling truck was a White. I didn't think the hood louvers were correct, and the "waves" in the hoods aren't identical, but as close as they were, with the poor photo of the loco hauler. I should have known with the absence of a parking brake lever and a left hand drive. Gary?

141076143_WhiteMotorCompanyVelvetIceCreamDeliveryTruckebay.thumb.jpg.8fe2a2c48cd88a9a0b7b0f5176c086f8.jpg

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SousaphoneCase43 (?) got this email from TubaCase47:

Tom Railsback wrote; Gary, do you have a picture of Carl's [Mehmke] Michelet truck you could post?  If anyone has information on it, I think it would be Roger. Roger, step up to the microphone. Testing, Testing, 1,2,3, Testing... Gary?

1732203056_MichelettruckMehmke.jpg.26a51160094d3f6601d22e55b0099cea.jpg

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1046636324_WagonsMicheletTruckinoldmuseumshedMehmke8-27-16.thumb.JPG.ae7cf4d018032b287377e32ee2167dcf.JPG

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There was a local once a year consignment sale today. Ended up being a good auction day. It wasn’t quite an @MT Matt auction day ? but I found something that his W9 would like. It’s a 4x14” model #70 plow. It needs new wear parts but is in pretty good shape otherwise. 

9F196207-C94F-404A-A9F9-0B64CB65B93D.jpeg

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The subject of the Michelet truck has come up here before and on Smok-Stak and I'll give you the same answer . . . I don't know, nor does anyone else at this time.  After checking all the major truck historian's books like Lloyd VanHorn, Albert Mroz and Donald Woods, there is NO RECORD of that truck being made or imported into the USA.  There is also no listing in the American Truck Historical Society and Bud Tierney can find no cross reference for any gaskets/parts for the engine.  I have never seen any detailed pictures of the engine/trany/differential/wheels/radiator/steering to know what components were used in the truck.  There are a couple of possibilities, first being it was built by a small company that put together a truck from component suppliers with the idea of going into the truck manufacturing business and only assembled a handful of trucks.  In that case, they probably never registered their name in any manufactures registry.  There were a fair number of cases of this happening during the 1910-1920 period.  There were two examples like that of trucks Lloyd purchased when he operated the museum.   It could have been built outside the USA but internet searches have never come up with a foreign manufacture either. There is also the possibility that it is a "vanity" truck.  A truck build by a registered maker that had a custom radiator with the name of a business/trucking company put on it.  There are a few instances recorded of that being done.  An example would be if back in 1918, Anson grandfather had a big melon farm and needed 10 trucks to ship his produce around Mississippi (or maybe to Montana).   He could have the little XYZ truck company make up those ten trucks with a special radiator saying SHELDON across the top.   These are the best answers I can give you . . . maybe someday the true history of that truck will surface.

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Hey Sledgehammer, that is a nice looking #70 plow!  A neighbor had a 4 bottom but it disappeared before I could get it.  My moldboards looked wore just like that until I swapped them out last fall. 

0F0C1D87-1FB2-4185-8F4C-6B02206087D7.thumb.jpeg.cf2f99103898eff4e9a24121f1454438.jpeg

I finished up the Super A a couple days ago, fresh oils all around, changed over to 12 volt and even up-graded the seat. 

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It had a torsion suspension seat from an Oliver but was too far forward. I dug through my parts pile and came up with a seat from a C Farmall. Best up-grade ever!  I took her for a drive and it rides like a dream!  Motor runs smooth and the smoke cleared right up. Now the last thing to do is mount the mower from my A on it and rig up a cable to the hydraulic lift arm. I’ll wait until it warms up to do that. 

On my drive around the farm, I noticed I lost a few pines trees to the big wind storm we had last week.  Guess there were gusts to 125 mph near Missoula that day.  Gary did you get blown across Helena or did your truckload of watermelons hold you down?? ?

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53 minutes ago, MT Matt said:

Hey Sledgehammer, that is a nice looking #70 plow!  A neighbor had a 4 bottom but it disappeared before I could get it.  My moldboards looked wore just like that until I swapped them out last fall. 

0F0C1D87-1FB2-4185-8F4C-6B02206087D7.thumb.jpeg.cf2f99103898eff4e9a24121f1454438.jpeg

I finished up the Super A a couple days ago, fresh oils all around, changed over to 12 volt and even up-graded the seat. 

BEABD4C4-F6E6-4C25-B4B4-693F95E2F4B3.thumb.jpeg.97010adde40b14c357e3a08d10fec070.jpeg

It had a torsion suspension seat from an Oliver but was too far forward. I dug through my parts pile and came up with a seat from a C Farmall. Best up-grade ever!  I took her for a drive and it rides like a dream!  Motor runs smooth and the smoke cleared right up. Now the last thing to do is mount the mower from my A on it and rig up a cable to the hydraulic lift arm. I’ll wait until it warms up to do that. 

On my drive around the farm, I noticed I lost a few pines trees to the big wind storm we had last week.  Guess there were gusts to 125 mph near Missoula that day.  Gary did you get blown across Helena or did your truckload of watermelons hold you down?? ?

Super A looks really nice. ????  
 

Don’t let the black paint fool you, the points are all junk and at least two of the moldboards are totally shot. I hope I have enough to replace them. I’m almost positive I have 3. I m hoping to use the option of dropping one bottom and making it a 3 bottom for now. I could pull it with my 686 but I’d rather pull it with an older machine properly set up for that. Be a good excuse to rebuild the engine on Great Grandpas Farmall 350. Or....an even better excuse to try and buy a 450, that way I could leave the 4th bottom on it. ?

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OK fellas, at the moment this page has turned into a bit of an old truck thread.  My old friend Lloyd Van Horn just turned 90 last week so I thought I'd post photos of just a few of the trucks that were in the Van Horn Truck Museum located in Mason City, Iowa.  Lloyd collected his first early truck in 1971 and by 1983 he had enough trucks the he decided to open a museum dedicated to pre 1925 trucks which operated until 2001  The collection generally had 80+ trucks on display.  I started working with Lloyd in about 1985 and over the years, well over 200 pre 1925 trucks went through the collection with many of them being restored.  The first photo is of Lloyd taken about 15 years ago in front of his Wilcox truck that was manufactured in Minnesota.  His is also in a number of the other photos below, some of which were used on GMC truck calendars over the years.

952700384_WilcoxLloyd.jpg.1e98a9aa176f51d0c3f6cd1d64feea28.jpg

 

VanHorn Buick.jpg

VanHorn GMC.jpg

VanHorn Oldsmobile.jpg

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Studebaker.jpg

TransportFuelTruck.jpg

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GMCFuelTruck.jpg

LoadingDock.jpg

PanhardGasTruck.jpg

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Yes Matt, the museum had 1000s of other items related to the pre-1925 period of mechanical history.   I forgot to add this photo of Gary and Lloyd taken a few years ago in the little private museum Lloyd has behind his house.

 

Dsc03795.jpg

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Roger and Gary, It wasn't until after I looked at some of your photos that I realized I was at that sale.  A friend of mine conned me into going with him up there.  As it turns out I believe I bought more junk than he did, but it was his gooseneck and pickup, so I went.  I remember that calliope.  
In about 1940 my dad bought a GMC truck.  It looks like maybe the same chassis that is under that calliope.  Anyway, he wanted it for the chassis.  He bought it in Corpus Christi, Texas.  He found a couple of guys to strip all the cab and engine off of it and driveline.  All he wanted was the frame and wheels.  It's possible he had it towed to a blacksmith and they put a towing tongue on it so he could make a cotton trailer out of the chassis which was very usual at the time.  The difference is the one I have here today, it has wood spoke wheels with solid rubber tires.   In the earlier days of cotton picking the custom was you had cabins on your farmstead for families to live in while they were here picking.  Dad always brought some families from Poteet, TX to live on the place.  Then later in the 50s the custom became where the guy that had a grain truck would go around the neighborhood every morning and pick up hands to bring out to the fields.  He was called a contractor.  Hopefully it relieved the property owner from some liability.  Anyway, the contractor used his truck to tow a cotton trailer to the field.  Well the trailer that he towed was the solid rubber tire one made from the old GMC truck.  As it turns out they failed to secure the hitch pin.  He had to drive about ten miles to the field.  And one was a gravel washboard road.  Well, the hitchpin jumped out.  The trailer went into the bar ditch and the tongue went to the ground, broke off and the right front wheel of the trailer hit the bank on the other side of the ditch and bent the leafsprings up somewhat.  I believe it sheared that stay bolt in the middle of the leafsprings.  Anyway, they had to get a tractor to pull the tongue out of the ground and take it to the  blacksmith shop and have it welded.  They straightened the spring up somehow.  It did not hurt the wood wheel, however it did weaken the spring somewhat.  That right hand side was always a little lower.  Anyway, we still used the trailer for years except when my younger brother bought a new, probably one of the first Ford Diesel 3/4 ton and we were using cotton picking machines to load the trailers.  Another brother and myself were behind the younger  brother with the diesel pickup.  We were each towing a loaded cotton trailer to the gin.  Of course the younger brother, being younger, he had a tendency to show off.  We noticed smoke coming up from the right hand area of that trailer but we couldn't catch him to warn him.  Anyway, apparently the trailer was loaded enough to cause the wood box to come down and touch that solid rubber tire.  Those tires have a hollow core and it had broken through.  Anyway, I guess my younger brother finally did see the smoke and he stopped and we blocked it up enough that it didn't rub.  Anyway, I don't think we ever used that trailer again.  It just kind of split the tire.  
Here is some photos.  Best I could do.  That trailer is still under the shed.  The back tires are like duals.  You can read on the side yet -- Firestone -- altho the tires look like they are made of alligator skin.  But I hate fixing flat tires and of all the years we've messed with that trailer we've never had a flat tire!  In fact, they are still aired up today!  
 
What I bought from the sale was a 1936 18-27 Oliver row crop.  And a number of these pairs of wheels like this cast iron one that I show below.  
 
 
 
VanHorn GMC.jpg
 
Here's the wheels from the trailer under the shed that my dad made in 1940?  The reason I know it's a GMC is because my brother and I took the little cast iron GMC logo (I believe it's identical to the one on the side of the calliope) that was bolted onto the rear crossmember.  We took it off for safekeeping, but of course, I don't know where it is today.  
 
 
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I brought several pairs of these home from that sale.  
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IMG_2742.JPG

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On 1/17/2021 at 2:13 PM, Roger Byrne said:

Gary posted some great old truck photos above.  The one of a Autowagon backed up to the Post Office is a 1911 Model A with a FACTORY special USPS body that they started selling that year.  Because Autowagons were such a dependable/versatile truck, many were used by the USPS and IHC started to offer a body design that met their needs.

That truck with the small Baldwin locomotive is a Saurer truck built about 1912.   I was lucky enough to help with the restoration of the only American built Saurer truck in existence.  Lloyd Van Horn purchased the truck at an auction up in Alaska where it had been discovered when they were building the pipeline.  The basic chassis and mechanics of the truck were there but no body of any kind and many small parts were missing.  We did a complete tear-down of the truck and a full, very detailed restoration was done.  I did the engine/trany/mechanical rebuilt in my shop while Lloyd and his Grandson, Scott Mineart, built the body and did the rest of the restoration work at the museum.  The engine is a T-head design with dual cams and was built with the first known version of a "Jake Brake".   The Saurer was Lloyd's pride and joy until it was sold at the auction when the museum closed in 2002.  The truck can now be seen in the I-80 Truck Stop Museum at Walcott, Iowa.  Saurer trucks were first built in Switzerland in 1911 and this truck was built in the USA by the newly formed International Motor Company which consisted of the merger of Mack, Hewitt and Saurer.  After a few years, the American company just went under the Mack name.  Saurer trucks were still built over seas until 1956.

826560913_1912SaureratI-80.thumb.jpg.2183f055c8a2aef035ad588806546c80.jpg

346039283_1912Saurer002.jpg.94370d4b344c00b5b857aefea7ef5882.jpg

Saurer Trucks where made till the early 80s, the company was one of the first in the industry that used Direct injection in Diesel Engines. They even sold a licence for their Diesel engine to a Swiss tractor company. Saurer still exists but only makes textile machines which they always made, their diesel engine development department is now owned by the Parent company that owns Case New Holland.  

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On 1/17/2021 at 2:13 PM, Roger Byrne said:

Gary posted some great old truck photos above.  The one of a Autowagon backed up to the Post Office is a 1911 Model A with a FACTORY special USPS body that they started selling that year.  Because Autowagons were such a dependable/versatile truck, many were used by the USPS and IHC started to offer a body design that met their needs.

That truck with the small Baldwin locomotive is a Saurer truck built about 1912.   I was lucky enough to help with the restoration of the only American built Saurer truck in existence.  Lloyd Van Horn purchased the truck at an auction up in Alaska where it had been discovered when they were building the pipeline.  The basic chassis and mechanics of the truck were there but no body of any kind and many small parts were missing.  We did a complete tear-down of the truck and a full, very detailed restoration was done.  I did the engine/trany/mechanical rebuilt in my shop while Lloyd and his Grandson, Scott Mineart, built the body and did the rest of the restoration work at the museum.  The engine is a T-head design with dual cams and was built with the first known version of a "Jake Brake".   The Saurer was Lloyd's pride and joy until it was sold at the auction when the museum closed in 2002.  The truck can now be seen in the I-80 Truck Stop Museum at Walcott, Iowa.  Saurer trucks were first built in Switzerland in 1911 and this truck was built in the USA by the newly formed International Motor Company which consisted of the merger of Mack, Hewitt and Saurer.  After a few years, the American company just went under the Mack name.  Saurer trucks were still built over seas until 1956.

826560913_1912SaureratI-80.thumb.jpg.2183f055c8a2aef035ad588806546c80.jpg

346039283_1912Saurer002.jpg.94370d4b344c00b5b857aefea7ef5882.jpg

Forgot to add Saurer made its first truck in 1903 and not in 1911 in Arbon Switzerland ;) The first made truck is back in the Saurer museum in Arbon the good old number 0 

 

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Thanks for the great information U-C!!  That's more information than is shown in the few books that talk about those trucks.  The reference books do say the first Saurer were built in 1903 and it's great that first one survives.  The so called "American Saurer" production is shown as being from 1911 to 1918.  That first Saurer is a totally different design than the 1912 version that was built in this country.   It would be interesting to know if the 1912 versions in Switzerland used the same components as the American built truck.  It could also be that the American version was just assembled in this country from the Swiss manufactured parts.  I know when I worked on it, the drive train was nothing like any of the other American trucks I've worked on.  That's one thing about a forum like this, you get the benefit of knowledge from people from all over the world.  I'll update my notes on the Saurer Company and pass the info on to Lloyd and a bunch of other old truck guys.   Thanks again for the corrections and updated information.

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We had a colorful visitor.

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Neighbor with turkeys, etc acquired a peacock--------he took a liking to our door step and yard.

Really colorfull-----will get better pictures when we get some sunshine.

 

DD

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7 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

In the bright sunlight------I expect "Clarence the Peacock" to be about as colorful as Loyd Van Horns circus wagon.  Those are some colorful pictures Roger.

 

DD

Yes but they tend to be as loud as they are colorful.

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37 minutes ago, ray54 said:

Yes but they tend to be as loud as they are colorful.

I can verify this!  Dad acquired a pair when I was in High School. Whomever he got them from probably let out a sigh of relief to pawn them off onto some unsuspecting soul.

Yes the male was “pretty as a peacock” and him fanning out was neat. The loud squawks in the middle of the night and roosting over the equipment/vehicles in the shed led to their disappearance from the farm.  Pigeons couldn’t hold a candle to the mess those two critters could leave behind.

 I don’t know if they went to someone else or experienced an instant case of lead poisoning but I do know we didn’t eat them at Thanksgiving!  That was one thing that I forgot to ask Dad about before he passed, where did those monsters get to??? ?

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13 minutes ago, MT Matt said:

Pigeons couldn’t hold a candle to the mess those two critters could leave behind.

When I was a kid, we had a "door step" goose.........

Too fat to fly, and with a mood that made Genghis Kahn appear to be downright sociable.

Couldn't fly but he sure could run...(don't miss him at ALL!!!)

Mike

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