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Hey fellas, now don't forget about ACME trucks.   They were built from 1915 to 1931 and here is a 1917 version I just finished working on this fall.

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When I arrived at Silver Creek this morning, Son Mike was finishing mowing meadow grass down by the barley field. It will be hay for Heather's goats. He was just finishing up and brought the Farmall F

A little background on the 1917 Acme truck.  I got it from the VanHorn Truck Museum in exchange for a bunch of work I did for them back in 1997.  I was a typical museum vehicle,  painted up but not op

Hey fellas, now don't forget about ACME trucks.   They were built from 1915 to 1931 and here is a 1917 version I just finished working on this fall.

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17 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

 I wish you'd have rolled the film in that projector ahead a couple of frames more.

This what you mean?  And by the way, l've seen a lot of different things in my life but l NEVER till today knew that there was such a thing as ACME trucks. Maybe those ACME truck lines trucks that run over the coyote are really ACME trucks.

Last spring in the little community where l live, a few people complained they kept hearings coyotes bark and howl. And about a week later there was a incident involving a C-130J hitting a coyote on the runway at Dyess AFB. Anyway, our local police chief posted this flyer on Facebook. Don't know if he made it or copied it.

 

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coyote 911.JPG

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twostepn2001, That is exactly what I was asking, when "roll the projector ahead a couple more frames." That Acme anvil smashing Wylie Coyote. Then he airs back up and goes on his way again. No violence at all!

737278653_AcmeanvilsmashingWylieCoyoteTodd.jpg.b1ccb20c5a5cc5c9ced557b888ea50d4.jpg

Roger I remember you had an old truck in your shed that you were planning to restore. I'd forgotten that it is an Acme. There was also the Stewart truck that you gave to Troy Vetsch. I probably have "before photos" somewhere in this computer? 

All of that to say, you certainly did a "Roger Byrne" job on that ACME truck. I see items on it you likely scrounged for long and hard at swap meets. Do you need me to chip in for a can of green enamel for that truck box? Anyway, I'm extremely impressed with your Acme truck, Roger! That is stunningly beautiful. And you were thinking you needed a Model TT? Balderdash! You're sittin' in tall cotton my friend!  Gary😉

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Ok you guys seem pretty smart on hear I found this when I was taking down the old pump house it was up above the ceiling it's made out of cast iron it's 14 1/2 inches across the top spins on the bottom the bottom would fit over a 4 1/2 inch post and it's about a foot tall nobody around hear knows what it is I have no idea so I'm hoping someone on hear dose. Thanks Steve   

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32 minutes ago, Sledgehammer said:

My guess is a horse/mule driven pump part. Similar to this pic. 

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There is no drive shaft coming out the bottom though

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2 hours ago, SASW6 said:

There is no drive shaft coming out the bottom though

That just a guess and no two drawings are the same for those. Some were overhead and not mounted on the ground. 

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A little background on the 1917 Acme truck.  I got it from the VanHorn Truck Museum in exchange for a bunch of work I did for them back in 1997.  I was a typical museum vehicle,  painted up but not operational.  When I got it, the drive shaft and frame had been cut apart to run some kind of equipment so I had to repair the frame and make a driveshaft.  I then got it running (sorta) but lots of nasty noises in the engine.  In the fall of 1998 I stuck it back in the shed figuring to get back on it "next year".   Well "next year" finally came around and I did some work on the engine over the winter which was basically just tightened up the rod/main bearings and go over the valves. The engine went back in this summer, did a bunch of mechanical chassis work and I've been refitting it to make it into a REAL truck using parts I've collected over the the last 30+ years.  I had to do a lot of rework on the wheels that included drilling through the tires/rims and into the spokes using 6" lag bolts.  I ended up having to repaint the chassis and wheels to make it look decent.  When I reworked the grain box, after cleaning up 80 years of crud, it absorbed over 2 gallons of a Linseed Oil/Turpentine mixture.   No Gary, that grain box is not going to be repainted.   That box was bought new in the 30's by the father of a couple friends of mine and it will keep what original paint it has.  Below is a photo of my old friends of almost 60 years, brothers Bob (95) and Bernie (93) Rath next to that old grain box they used to shovel grain out of when then were kids in Storm Lake, Iowa.  I still have some wheel work to do on the Acme and a few more details, but at least it's getting there. 

8.5x11 DSC09565.jpg

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25 minutes ago, Roger Byrne said:

A little background on the 1917 Acme truck.  I got it from the VanHorn Truck Museum in exchange for a bunch of work I did for them back in 1997.  I was a typical museum vehicle,  painted up but not operational.  When I got it, the drive shaft and frame had been cut apart to run some kind of equipment so I had to repair the frame and make a driveshaft.  I then got it running (sorta) but lots of nasty noises in the engine.  In the fall of 1998 I stuck it back in the shed figuring to get back on it "next year".   Well "next year" finally came around and I did some work on the engine over the winter which was basically just tightened up the rod/main bearings and go over the valves. The engine went back in this summer, did a bunch of mechanical chassis work and I've been refitting it to make it into a REAL truck using parts I've collected over the the last 30+ years.  I had to do a lot of rework on the wheels that included drilling through the tires/rims and into the spokes using 6" lag bolts.  I ended up having to repaint the chassis and wheels to make it look decent.  When I reworked the grain box, after cleaning up 90 years of crud, it absorbed over 2 gallons of a Linseed Oil/Turpentine mixture.   No Gary, that grain box is not going to be repainted.   That box was bought new in the late 30's by the father of a couple friends of mine and it will keep what original paint it has.  Below is a photo of my old friends of almost 60 years, Bob (95) and Bernie (93) Rath next to that old grain box they used to shovel grain out of when then were kids in Storm Lake, Iowa.  I still have some wheel work to do on the Acme and a few more details, but at least it's getting there. 

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Great story to go with that truck Roger. I knew it was an older grain box but that story makes it great! 

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Work has been busy lately and most of the rest of the time has been with little guy and the wife it seems (not a bad thing). I’ve been sneaking off for a few minutes here and there to clean on the post vise I picked up at the sale with the post drill press.I bought it knowing it was all there and needed a new “straight” handle and the dirt cleaned off of it. The wedges weren’t original and had been bent badly so I cut them out to disassemble the vise. I hope to get the bracket into the forge and straightened tomorrow if I get a chance along with making a new handle and wedges. Some parts are clean already and ready to go back together. 

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It has a really nice makers mark. “Iron City” made all kinds of blacksmithing tools. I had no idea what brand it was until this evening. Followed up with a pile of parts 😊

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I have to get this one finished so I can start on the next one that I picked up on my way home from work today 😁 Maybe I have a problem??  I need to look at some details. I’m thinking it may be made by the Trenton company that was best known for good quality anvils. 

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SASW6 --  I was surprised when I saw that on your tailgate.  I have one of those.  I got it maybe 30 years ago or so.  Anyway, it was pre-internet.  I couldn't figure out what it was either.  I noticed that it looked to be mounted on a wood post and I could see where it looked like it was made for wood stakes to go into the four spiders.  I never could figure out what it was.  The only thing I could think of was a horse walker but I had never seen one that wasn't powered.  When I saw yours I looked it up on the internet and found this.  So I'm thinking it could be something to make a horse walker.  Here is a  link to what I found.  

https://horseyhooves.com/horse-walkers/#:~:text=The horse walker is a,horse's halter (lead walkers).

 

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18 minutes ago, Fred B said:

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SASW6 --  I was surprised when I saw that on your tailgate.  I have one of those.  I go it maybe 30 years ago or so.  Anyway, it was pre-internet.  I couldn't figure out what it was either.  I noticed that it looked to be mounted on a wood post and I could see where it looked like it was made for wood stakes to go into the four spiders.  I never could figure out what it was.  The only thing I could think of was a horse walker but I had never seen one that wasn't powered.  When I saw yours I looked it up on the internet and found this.  So I'm thinking it could be something to make a horse walker.  Here is a  link to what I found.  

https://horseyhooves.com/horse-walkers/#:~:text=The horse walker is a,horse's halter (lead walkers).

 

That makes sense thanks. I found a few interesting things in there this was my great grandfathers farm he built it in 1889 I have owned it for 30 years. I find it interesting that they would have used something like that.

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In a way it was a 'horse walker', except the horses were expected to work as they walked round and round, in order to power whatever machine it was attached to.

 

 

There would have been a set of gears to increase the speed on the output shaft.

They were also used to power a winch to pull stumps.

HorsePowering the 19thCentury Farm (1)-page-006.jpg

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Making circles isn’t fun with hand tools. The piece is cast and I needed to fill a considerable gap... A piece of scrap angle and some welding later, it almost looks like it should. You just can’t find parts for a 120 yr old post vise... After welding I heated it all up and did some light hammering. Then shut off the forge and let it cool slowly in the forge. Doesn’t look terrible and fits nicely. I bet Roger has the same trouble finding parts for ACME trucks 😊

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Todd, 120 year old vises, ACME trucks, and steam engines! I've built a lot of parts for them! Unless you can locate the old part elsewhere, you're tasked with building them. A lathe and milling machine are helpful, but sometimes just plain old use of a hammer and anvil with raw iron is the only answer.

I don't do much serious work in the shop anymore. But this past August, I was determined to fix an aggravation on the Case steam engine. The clutch engagement ring had worn over the years and it wouldn't quite put the clutch overcenter. I could stick a piece of 1/4" stock in there and pull the lever and it would overcenter the clutch.

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So I took a piece of 1/4" brass plate, drilled a hole in the center of where I wanted it, tightened a long chunk of Grade 8 stud bolt into that hole, chucked the bolt in the lathe and proceeded to turn (gently) that plate into that ring. 

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After I got the ring hogged out, this is what I had.

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Then I had to straighten some of it enough that I could button it over the clutch sleeve.

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Mike came home from work as I'd just gotten it over the sleeve of the clutch. We fought it for about a half hour, getting the "straight part" bent back into a curve that was tight. After we got it bent, this is what what we had. And steaming the engine up to thresh, it worked perfectly. Otherwise, we would have had to pull the key in the flywheel and crankshaft, pull the flywheel, pull the clutch sleeve then fix it like a "restorer" would. I'm too old for that. Besides, Mike is only 20 years younger than me, and Randy's only 13 years younger. So we've adopted the "Five Mile Rule" with our steam engines. Will this "fix" last while this engine may never travel another 5 miles while we own it? We try to fix accordingly on things of a "non explosive, or non scalding" nature.  Gary😁

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I want to take this time to thank each and every veteran who served our country. You are appreciated greatly by this old guy. Thank you from the bottom of my heart, that you vowed to defend the country and our constitution, never being relieved of that duty! Gary😔 NG28720961

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   I just want to thank all of you for this fantastic piece of history that you are unraveling for me. I have been on this forum for quite a while,and i would peek at the "IH TRACTORS ON A MONTANA FARM "thread  but i never went back to the beginning.  All of the pictures that you share are amazing , i guess my elders were to poor to afford to take those kind of pictures, or they didn't have the forethought . Most of the old pictures we have are of people not equipment.

  I have made it to page 10, in my spare time so i have 877 pages to go, and i look forward to page 11.

 

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Gary and Fred B.

l need to apologize to you guys. A here while back, you posted this pic and said it was a cotton picker. And a few posts later, Fred B. agreed with you. But l argued with both of you saying it looked more like some kind of corn harvester.

Well, couple of days ago l showed the pic to a couple of green blooded full fledged John Deere guru friends and they gave me quite a bit of info about it. lt is a JD experimental #10 cotton harvester mounted on a GPWT tractor. The elevator on the back was on the side and there was a offset hitch to pull a wagon. Cotton was dumped into sacks and then stacked on the wagon. No experimental model # 10's exist today.

The "production" model #10 was a bit bit different. Had different "headers" and shields on the chains to keep cotton stalks from making the chains jump off the sprockets. And the elevator and wagon hitch were behind the tractor instead of offset. Total costs of the model # 10 was $850.00. Only a handful were sold in 1931 and the ones that didn't sell were destroyed and scrapped and none are known to exist today.

 There was also a #5 one row cotton harvester. Basic design of the #10 but a single row. lt was like the #10, very few sold and the rest scrapped. One of the main reasons either one didn't sell was at the time no gins could handle cotton with so much trash in it.

JD #10-experimental.jpg

JD #10 picker 1931.jpg

JD #5 picker.jpg

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2 hours ago, from H to 80 said:

   I just want to thank all of you for this fantastic piece of history that you are unraveling for me. I have been on this forum for quite a while,and i would peek at the "IH TRACTORS ON A MONTANA FARM "thread  but i never went back to the beginning.  All of the pictures that you share are amazing , i guess my elders were to poor to afford to take those kind of pictures, or they didn't have the forethought . Most of the old pictures we have are of people not equipment.

  I have made it to page 10, in my spare time so i have 877 pages to go, and i look forward to page 11.

 

H to 80, Thanks for the kind words! I've never gone back and tried to go through this "mess." I figured I'd wait to see if I got put in prison for something. Then I'd have the time and nothing else to do!

The way our country is so messed up in so many ways, this is my "new mantra."

1640817343_oldsoldierholdingaM1garandriflemainbattleweapontheolderIgetthelessLIFEinprisonis.jpg.0db8a83fb02aef7cdc951cef3e727e9d.jpg

I just have to find a real cheap International Harvester M1 Garand rifle and some of those steel clips, I used to dig holes with my entrenching tool and bury by the steel helmet full. Maybe someone on Red Power wants do donate an IH Garand to me? Maybe it would be worth it to donate an IH Garand to me, just to stop this nonsense on IH Tractors on a Montana Farm?!!!😁

Mike recently put the Model T back into its winter berth and pushed Tony, the 1940 IHC Farmall A inside so it could be worked on this winter, if I ever get my back and hip to calm down from the pinched nerve in my spine. I go in three hours to get a steroid injection into my left hip. I'm hoping to be able to stand for more than 2 minutes again! Did I mention that Tony is an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm?  Gary😉

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PS: Look at my chrome plated cane and my new junk store walker!😁

 

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3 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

H to 80, Thanks for the kind words! I've never gone back and tried to go through this "mess." I figured I'd wait to see if I got put in prison for something. Then I'd have the time and nothing else to do!

The way our country is so messed up in so many ways, this is my "new mantra."

1640817343_oldsoldierholdingaM1garandriflemainbattleweapontheolderIgetthelessLIFEinprisonis.jpg.0db8a83fb02aef7cdc951cef3e727e9d.jpg

I just have to find a real cheap International Harvester M1 Garand rifle and some of those steel clips, I used to dig holes with my entrenching tool and bury by the steel helmet full. Maybe someone on Red Power wants do donate an IH Garand to me? Maybe it would be worth it to donate an IH Garand to me, just to stop this nonsense on IH Tractors on a Montana Farm?!!!😁

Mike recently put the Model T back into its winter berth and pushed Tony, the 1940 IHC Farmall A inside so it could be worked on this winter, if I ever get my back and hip to calm down from the pinched nerve in my spine. I go in three hours to get a steroid injection into my left hip. I'm hoping to be able to stand for more than 2 minutes again! Did I mention that Tony is an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm?  Gary😉

1923949585_TonyPeerlesssteamengine1926ModelTFordinshop11-5-2020.thumb.jpg.6ddb2243e43c9a269b804177b32e3082.jpg

PS: Look at my chrome plated cane and my new junk store walker!😁

 

I much appreciate your writing skills, i hated english in school and now it shows.

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7 hours ago, from H to 80 said:

I much appreciate your writing skills, i hated english in school and now it shows.

H to 80, I got very poor grades in high school English. I likely never got better than a C-, and had to struggle to keep from getting Ds. My English teacher kept telling me he was giving me a "social promotion." However, I don't know what they are called, but I've always worked at learning the "Two, To and Too, There and Their," etc. meanings and how to use them. I really tried to put my "brane" into improving in later years. My wife was very good at English, although not the best speller. I was always pretty good at spelling, so we have helped each other along life's 57-1/2 years. She wrote a book and published it in 2000 (Y2K). I did the photo scans and the captions. I learned the most there. But I still appreciate it when this computer "lights up" a word for me that I missed. Thank you for joining us, whatever the duration! Gary😉

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