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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


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When I arrived at Silver Creek this morning, Son Mike was finishing mowing meadow grass down by the barley field. It will be hay for Heather's goats. He was just finishing up and brought the Farmall F

Yesterday was Dad's youngest sibling, my late Uncle Audie Yaeger's birthday. He was born April 19, 1910. His first son Alvin was born in 1940. He was a favorite of mine, as he'd take time for me, thre

Nice tribute post for Memorial Day Gary. **** I stumbled upon these pictures today of my 1943 model TD-14 with my homemade 3 pt hitch pulling a 6 row hipper in 1973.  The old crawler was a l

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3 hours ago, U-C said:

found this on Facebook this evening lol

119082637_4291613884243770_7490324818948703207_n.jpg?_nc_cat=111&_nc_sid=825194&_nc_ohc=hcN9peNi9YoAX-uSuvI&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-2.xx&oh=5d5415e9c20bdac44607217627861c9e&oe=5F7C725A

I would almost bet that’s a new photo made to look vintage. It’s cool either way but I think I’ve seen a vintage dealership setup like that in one of the Carolinas maybe?  The tread on the bottom of the “customer’s” shoe looks modern also. 

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The customer looks like Ben T. You PA guys should know?  They have their old dealership near Bloomsburg. We visited it during the Roundup. I  can't recall the name of the small town it is in. 

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12 hours ago, Fred B said:

  

Gary, I ran across this new tune for you to try out with your squeeze box.   

That's thoughtful of you Fred. I like the song. But like everything else I'm finding at my age, my short term memory isn't worth a darn. I have 400+ old songs that rattle around inside my head that I can sit down and play. That uses long term memory, which is still pretty good. (This forum is one way I'm able to keep that working!) If someone suggests a song that I'd heard sometime in my lifetime and it is still circulating in my head, I can sometimes learn them.

It sounds like these brothers are playing some kind of electronic instrument, likely "accordions?" Gary

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Thanks Gary, I guess I was just thinking mostly of the novelty of the 'Cotton Patch' title.  Although it does seem to be a little catchy.  These two brothers are in central Texas somewhere, though I've not heard of them until I saw this.  Other videos they have shows one of them plays the button accordion and one of them a keyboard accordion.  They also play other instruments.  I know what you mean when you mention the memory subject.  I do enjoy your photos that you put up.  Fred  

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22 hours ago, Fred B said:

  

Gary, I ran across this new tune for you to try out with your squeeze box.   

Professor-----

You get it organized on your squeezebox;  bring Tuba Case in on it for a random big honk; we will get TwoStep on the dance floor with a couple of "settled age ladies (you know, about 23---24 yrs age)------with Roger in the background blowing on the steam whustle; SledgeHammer tapping on his anvil for the drum corps

and Fred and myself selling tickets and putting out a little conversation promoting the Cotton Patch Polka.  It will be a WINNER all the way around!!!!!

Plus-----if we get lucky;  TwoStep might bring in a bus load of those "settled age" cotton strippers that hang around the Booger Creek Gin.

We could use Tony's big RV as the band bus.  The Califonia license plates would automatically give us national recognition.

 

I can't see anything that could possibly go wrong!!!🤐😂🙄

There is something about that tune that both relaxed me and livened me up at the same time after spending all afternoon in the doctor's office.  Thanks for posting Fred.

 

DD

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Back to the dealership picture, the customer's cap has an adjustable headband on the cap that certainly isn't "Vintage", and take a look at the oil pan on the "M".

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On 9/9/2020 at 5:31 AM, U-C said:

found this on Facebook this evening lol

119082637_4291613884243770_7490324818948703207_n.jpg?_nc_cat=111&_nc_sid=825194&_nc_ohc=hcN9peNi9YoAX-uSuvI&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-2.xx&oh=5d5415e9c20bdac44607217627861c9e&oe=5F7C725A

Sorry sir, no can find them watery melons on-line terday, but if'n yer willin to wait summat, mebbe wee'll juss take a peek atta bumped oilpan for ye whlist ye's got 'er 'ere!

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Re:  Bumped oil pan

Good job-----eagle eyes👍

Looking closely at the oil pan brought back lots of old time memories.  I have brazed up several cracked oil pans on Farmall M's in my days.

Regardless of being a staged picture or not---------the picture sure is realistic to to what I remember seeing in my younger days.

I collected up several toy M's while tagging along with my daddy on parts runs to the Greenville, Mississippi Delta Implement store.  Frank Foresman was the long standing parts manager------extremely knowledgable, and a super nice guy.  Frank (old enough that I should have been calling him Mr. Frank) also was a toy tractor and model train collector.

The store manager was Slim Holiman----father to the late Harold H here on Red Power.

 

Thanks for the post and eagle eye comments.

 

DD

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there is a 3 row front mount bedder ( 2 in front,1 in back) that was often mounted here, it had a 2 1/4" diamond curved bar from side to side under the oil pan, it had stops to protect the pan, but if you forgot to install them, and put the lift chains too tight the bar would crease the pan. the customers shoe treads also don't look period.  the store in Robstown looked very much like this. At a sale I bought one of those shelf units between the openings. 

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Regardless of whether it's a new pic or a vintage, l think that pic of the M and dealer is still neat looking. But here is one that is the real deal. Pic of a 460 LP at the IH dealer in Slaton, Texas (about 15 miles SE of Lubbock) in 1963. This dealer also has the distinction of selling the first 806 on the south plains of Texas in late 1963. Here is a pic of it with a 6 row cotton planter in the spring of 1964.

Although from a different nearby dealer, my Dad had the 2nd 806 on the Texas south plains..

 

Slaton IH building - Copy.JPG

IH 806 LP- 6 row planter.JPG

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twostepn2001, "Regardless of whether it's a new pic or a vintage, l think that pic of the M and dealer is still neat looking." I agree with you twostepn! Staged with a dented oil pan doesn't bother me. I like the photo! Maybe it is because I used to work behind the counter? I wish I'd gotten away with the clock we had, like the one in that picture. I looked at it thousands of times over the years.

I have a bunch of photos here from Facebook to post. Maybe you guys don't like them, but I save them for here, because they fascinate me! This first one shows a big IHC Mogul tractor pulling a road grader, off to the side of the road, getting a few squirts of oil to stop the squealing!

681786926_IHCMogulofftothesideofaroadbeingworkedonpullingaroadgraderebay.thumb.jpg.7806231e6f2a5a62c62c0c1bf3b7765f.jpg

An IHC 8-16 tractor is out plowing with a steering device. Doesn't everyone wear a suit, tie and hat in the field?

1091250110_IHC8-16tractorwithplowingsteeringassistplowingDavidFuller.jpg.0923c203000c8ee5cd3c4dd2700acea6.jpg

A nice old photo of a Farmall Regular pulling a heavy duty wagon.

874729855_FarmerpullingaheavydutywagonwithhisIHCFarmallRegular.jpg.67c6d02b6c35b84408f3101fba50f139.jpg

Farmers have long been thinking of ways to keep the dirt and dust off of them, plus the misty rain on a halfway miserable spring day, trying to finish seeding. This farmer employed a piece of Henry Ford's 1925 Model TT Ford to give him that satisfaction with his McCormick Deering tractor.

606270791_1925ModelTTFordcabputonaMcCormickDeeringtractorIHC.jpg.a0b590e895440c5eabdbb8e94d857d01.jpg

This farmer found a way to leave ol' Dobbin in the barn and get the buckrake ("bullrake" on our farm) moving without him. He mounted it on his IHC Farmall B!

1795078673_BuckrakemountedonthefrontofanIHFarmallB.jpg.a875f1ca59a32beedd4ecb6e5639d70e.jpg

A little newer yet, the introduction of the IH Farmall C! I always wanted Dad to buy a Farmall C. I wanted to go to the field with one of these "baby Farmall M's" but he ignored my wishes! I started mowing with the Farmall Cub, then the Farmall Super A a few years later. That's as close as I got to a Farmall C. I did sit on the brand new ones inside Bourke Motor's indoor tractor display. I did a lot of dreaming!

101811269_1950IHFarmallCintroductoryadvertisement.jpg.09b273b33e135b0be2baf1678348e19d.jpg

This is an advertisement for the Farmall 300 with Torque Amplifier. I don't remember seeing any of these. The 300 Utility seemed to be the IH of choice in central Montana. I've spent a lot of time on two 300 Utility tractors. I still do on one of the two occasionally.

475313777_IHFarmall300tractorwithTorqueAmplifieradvertisement.thumb.jpg.2ced81e3c567e4fd301f9c7db6ed7720.jpg

I had to put this picture here too. It is of a large IH truck moving a covered bridge in Indiana years ago. I love "moving" pictures.

696026031_OldcoveredbridgebeingmovedwithanIHtruckinthe1960sParkeCountyIndiana.thumb.jpg.fe180d6e1717013a2fa05ca474ddac6a.jpgI'

I found some "non-IH" pictures that I wanted to post too. This first one is just fascinating to me, how even before hydraulics, men were looking for ways to ease the back pains and let machines do the work. A Caterpillar Thirty has a cable lift on a cumbersome bucket contraption, but he's loading a Model TT Ford truck with heavy duty wheels adapted to the front end. The stopping brakes are still just one drum with the bands running in oil, inside the transmission. However, I'd bet it has Rocky Mountain brakes? They added stopping power on the outside of the rear drums. The rear drums are just "parking brakes" otherwise. I don't know why this Model TT is a right hand drive model? Foreign photo? You don't suppose they're loading watermelons in that truck??

425460873_CaterpillarThirty30withamechanicalcableloaderdumpingintoanupgradedfrontwheeltireModelTTFordTruckDavidFullerIHC.jpg.b285833d7995a456d498210cec2f05ff.jpg

This one is for Anson. A Moline Universal tractor with a mounted combine, making this a "self propelled combine!"

716739429_MolineUniversaltractorwithamountedcombineDavidFullerIHC.thumb.jpg.21848ba09dac3cb64eaaf91e6485a3e7.jpg

Here's one for Tubacase47, A brand new paint job on a Case L with a cab. A 1926-27 Model T Ford Coupe "cab." It's been converted from steel to rubber tires too. The farmer has his son with him. 

576153684_BrandnewCaseLwithacabonthefarmDavidFullerIH.jpg.21af3f5b23e55b54aff0c41dde7ff7a3.jpg

Here's one for Roger. Or anyone else... I've never seen a bundle loader like this Stewart loader. It sounds like a great labor saver?

481752404_HorsepulledStewartShockLoaderDavidFullerIHC.thumb.jpg.bd709467cb95b836c81eba08b98e251d.jpg

And, Mike put the F-12 away in the shed for the winter when I was out last Tuesday. I had to put an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm on here, you know! Gary😉

1427227212_IHCMcCormick-DeeringFarmallF-12backedintoshedforwinter9-8-2020.thumb.jpg.f743f6a05fa35375b3d6532f408242fd.jpg

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Gary l saw a movie on TV just a few days ago that had this model of tractor in it. About a widow (Jane Wyman...l think) taking over the vegetable farm after her husband dies. After plowing for years with mules,  she finally made enough to by a "brand new" tractor. Had one really good scene where she was pulling a harrow with it. Looked like a sure nuff rough ridin' old tractor with them steel wheels. Course l guess it beat the heck out of walking behind two onery mules....lol  Only bad part about the movie was it gave me what Jethro Bodine might call a "powerful hankerin" for some home cooked cabbage....lol  But my original question was is what model is it?

 

IHC tractor.JPG

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7 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

I had to put this picture here too. It is of a large IH truck moving a covered bridge in Indiana years ago. I love "moving" pictures.

696026031_OldcoveredbridgebeingmovedwithanIHtruckinthe1960sParkeCountyIndiana.thumb.jpg.fe180d6e1717013a2fa05ca474ddac6a.jpg

 

Gary, I would almost bet that pic was taken in Southern Indiana. That truck says “Buchta” on the hood which is still a trucking company around the Evansville area. Not sure where they are based for but the Elmer Buchta trucking company still exists. Interesting picture for sure. 

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To answer twostepn2001's question, the tractor was called an International 8-16 and was built from late 1917 to 1922.  It used a four cylinder engine and the first version used the same engine as the Shovel Nose International trucks.  The engine was upgraded late in 1918 to a heavier design engine that was the forerunner to the 10-20 engine.   I have a 1920 version and it is a real nice tractor to operate compared to most of that period.  As far as a rough ride . . . nope, and the reason for that is it has three point coil spring suspension!   There is one spring above the front axle and a coil on each side of the rear axle.  That may be a good idea for a better ride but it makes for a real PIA to keep the correct tension of the final drive chains.  The tractor was later replace by the 10-20 McCormick Deering.

Below are pages from an International dealers book describing the "NEW" 8-16 International.

rev1317_International_Kerosene_Tractor.thumb.jpg.6198531e248c3c29aef40a307df447c1.jpg

rev2317_International_Kerosene_Tractor.thumb.jpg.a65a8cc867980fc4c339534cfc071f8e.jpg

 

 

rev7318_International_Kerosene_Tractor.thumb.jpg.285fce8194bc3311525128686eaa8264.jpg

 

rev8318_International_Kerosene_Tractor.thumb.jpg.e0bc85c883a87a72ff5ec89a69694b19.jpg

rev3319_International_Kerosene_Tractor.thumb.jpg.4d5a558be7789b2ba8f8785cbf2d0d3f.jpgrev4319_International_Kerosene_Tractor.thumb.jpg.cec687e0ff860a2aea0bfab9304de6d4.jpg

rev5320_International_Kerosene_Tractor.thumb.jpg.37aedcab016f8d062164bbfafe0ce097.jpgrev6320_International_Kerosene_Tractor.thumb.jpg.851091b7a2d924d57de7db650a4f6f9a.jpg

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 Great pictures Gary, always enjoyable with your narration to go with them!

B4ED80CC-C683-413A-9D9D-206578D29B3C.thumb.jpeg.59d3e54c8767e783bd7d728c5232a7a6.jpeg

Hows the smoke situation your way Gary?  Pretty bad over at the west edge of the state. 

E3B4DE7C-3A01-4453-8602-B9D836EAA608.thumb.jpeg.a11bc6a8b8faa118784166e4b63c6929.jpeg

I’ve been working on my IH #70 plow. The moldboards were completely shot so the torch came in handy to remove the entire bottom. 

5AEBD39A-5BDC-4743-B055-229153A8613E.thumb.jpeg.dd9ef269065868c5e992e62ece72dacd.jpeg

I traded seed oats this spring for an IH 309 3 pt three bottom plow from a friend. The shins and shares have some wear but the moldboards were in good shape.  Way better then what I removed from the #70. I unbolted everything that I could to reuse the bolts. I’m sure I’ll also find a use for the iron as well. 

D79553FA-3420-43F2-A596-C07CF6C30B77.thumb.jpeg.e1ef54e32ccc0769a53232f868bdd002.jpeg

It’s back together again.  I need to replace bearings in the colters yet. You can also see “Mable” the W-9 in the background that is a good match for this plow. She’s due for front and rear seals. That will be a pretty big job to pull the motor. And you can just see the wheels of my Super C. It’s about the most handy tractor on the farm to move things around. 

4E06F1BC-5E91-42D4-B2C4-DAF3DD887E57.thumb.jpeg.16f53d5d16f394d8b70e700955da81ee.jpeg

And one final question. The rear bottom on the 3 pt plow had a long landslide. Any reason to not just leave it alone?  The former one was short like you can see on the middle bottom. 

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2 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

Gary, I would almost bet that pic was taken in Southern Indiana. That truck says “Buchta” on the hood which is still a trucking company around the Evansville area. Not sure where they are based for but the Elmer Buchta trucking company still exists. Interesting picture for sure. 

Picture was taken in Rockville, IN, which is in Parke Co which is known for its many covered bridges and a big CB festival in the fall.

Buchta is headquartered near Jasper, IN  and is a big time coal and limestone hauler.

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8 minutes ago, Howard_P said:

Picture was taken in Rockville, IN, which is in Parke Co which is known for its many covered bridges and a big CB festival in the fall.

Buchta is headquartered near Jasper, IN  and is a big time coal and limestone hauler.

Thanks. I thought about the CB festival. That is more central than southern IN I suppose. We see a lot of Buchta trucks hauling coal down this way in Indiana. I don’t see them in IL ever to speak of. 

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15 hours ago, MT Matt said:

 Great pictures Gary, always enjoyable with your narration to go with them!

B4ED80CC-C683-413A-9D9D-206578D29B3C.thumb.jpeg.59d3e54c8767e783bd7d728c5232a7a6.jpeg

Hows the smoke situation your way Gary?  Pretty bad over at the west edge of the state. 

E3B4DE7C-3A01-4453-8602-B9D836EAA608.thumb.jpeg.a11bc6a8b8faa118784166e4b63c6929.jpeg

I’ve been working on my IH #70 plow. The moldboards were completely shot so the torch came in handy to remove the entire bottom. 

5AEBD39A-5BDC-4743-B055-229153A8613E.thumb.jpeg.dd9ef269065868c5e992e62ece72dacd.jpeg

I traded seed oats this spring for an IH 309 3 pt three bottom plow from a friend. The shins and shares have some wear but the moldboards were in good shape.  Way better then what I removed from the #70. I unbolted everything that I could to reuse the bolts. I’m sure I’ll also find a use for the iron as well. 

D79553FA-3420-43F2-A596-C07CF6C30B77.thumb.jpeg.e1ef54e32ccc0769a53232f868bdd002.jpeg

It’s back together again.  I need to replace bearings in the colters yet. You can also see “Mable” the W-9 in the background that is a good match for this plow. She’s due for front and rear seals. That will be a pretty big job to pull the motor. And you can just see the wheels of my Super C. It’s about the most handy tractor on the farm to move things around. 

4E06F1BC-5E91-42D4-B2C4-DAF3DD887E57.thumb.jpeg.16f53d5d16f394d8b70e700955da81ee.jpeg

And one final question. The rear bottom on the 3 pt plow had a long landslide. Any reason to not just leave it alone?  The former one was short like you can see on the middle bottom. 

MT Matt, First I want to thank you, until you're better paid for the ignition "on - off" switch you mailed me for IH Farmall A Tony! It arrived in the mail this afternoon! I have a pinched nerve in my back and have been seeing my chiropractor and will be doing that tomorrow, instead of going to Silver Creek. But, I'll get it mounted soon. I'll be sending you a check. ("Check's in the mail!!" 😉) You've heard that before!

I'm the poorest person to ask advice about moldboard plows. There are so many guys on here that farm with them on a regular basis. But I'm not one of them. I was 45 years old before I'd ever pulled a moldboard plow - with a steam engine. We only pulled 20-bottoms with a 40 hp Peerless steam engine. I'm firing the Peerless my late friend Carl Tuttle of Michigan.

794179261_40hpPeerlessmeTuttlePlowingatBelgrade.thumb.jpg.d5f03860e64d37d934c9f08ec6b69151.jpg

Now another friend has much more to boast about. Friend Kory Anderson built from scratch, this 150 hp Case we're standing by. He spent over $1,000,000 bringing his dream of seeing one of these in action. I had always figured I'd kick the bucket and never get to see such an engine. Son Mike and I went to Andover, South Dakota to see this engine introduced to the steam world. There were about a thousand people at the showgrounds that day and the next. So I got to add this to my bucket list without having to kick it!! This is me, Kory Anderson and America's longest running Case engineer and owner, Chady Atteberry of Blackwell, Oklahoma posing with Kory's gem.

1635261745_GarymeKoryAndersonChadyAtteberrywith150hpCase9-8-18.thumb.jpg.962d85f1ebce4fa032aa835e39647123.jpg

This is the sample or prototype 150 hp Case at the Racine, Wisconsin factory, serial number 14,666. The man at right was John Loeffelmacher, who designed the engine.

1710602623_150hpCase14666cylsideJ.LoeffelmacherRimp.thumb.jpg.7c9e634ab8bf7e2d5cb7e0468d6cc2c9.jpg

Mike and I had to see how tall we were in comparison with Kory's 150 hp Case. 

817755226_14666GarymeMikewithKorys150hpCase9-8-18.thumb.jpg.341845f92e166111c0f3721d4eeda2f2.jpg

And Mike and I got to compare OUR height with 150 hp Case, serial number 14,666! This is from the sample or original engine. Since it is an original piece of a 150 hp Case that would make Kory's engine "a restoration," wouldn't it Roger?

116017885_150hpCaseRoadLocomotiveNumberplatebadgeplaque1466614666.jpg.e9e93d56a1c7edc34130ff16453f746f.jpg

The original 150s failed due to cast iron gearing, no "Timken" bearings and only babbit boxings, misalignment of gearing, and the low speed gearing for plowing had gears turning all the time, when most of the two speed gearing was locked and didn't turn on the high speed road gear. Case stopped building them, as they were coming back to the factory for repairs. The new 32 hp Case, that became the 110 hp Case was built and off of the drawing board. It's huge, but not gigantic like the 150. It was the most successful big engine out there for numbers built and used. This shows you the difference in size. The little engine is the 110 hp Case.

310069583_KoryAndersons110hpand150hpCasefrontendMikeRohde.jpg.6ebd4ed36bdce4612883bd20d608dfbd.jpg

This was a picture Colin Beamish took of me on the 150 hp platform.

1729882605_MeGaryon150hpCaseplatform9-8-18.thumb.jpg.413f7beccdba7b07fde7b5a5960809ca.jpg

I'm visiting with Colin Beamish on the 150 hp Case. Colin and Jack Beamish fired the engine plowing.

1941508071_MeGaryColinBeamishaboard150hpCaseNateDegerstedt.jpg.9e032c31a64cecf3546cdaef1c0fb4b8.jpg

A friend took this picture of me almost reaching to the top of the 8' driver wheel. Jack Beamish and Kory are above.

1092702069_Mereachingthe8driverwheelJackBeamishKory9-7-18.thumb.jpg.72fbecfa29914d12d649303e397838a1.jpg

Here is a video of the 150 hp Case pulling 36-bottoms of John Deere Plow, MT Matt!  Some friends of mine on the plow deck. I got to meet three of the Ladies of Steam, an international organization. The mother took this photo of me with the two originators of Ladies of Steam at Andover in 2008. Take it from me, these ladies know a good thing when they see it!!!

PS: Matt, I wouldn't worry about that long landslide. It looks good to me, but what do I know about moldboard plows...

1220898159_NicoleKarenGarymeYaegerandJenniferClaraLadiesofSteamatAndover9-8-18.thumb.jpg.12909b9889715cbcf867eb7351cd937d.jpg

Gary😉

 

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864398436_MolineUniversaltractorwithamountedcombineDavidFullerIHC.jpg.aab8e7e5176f59ab71b9cb7c61a390e3.jpg

That is a Sunshine stripper harvester behind that Moline.  Probably taken in Ozzieland.  We also used the later Sunshine harvesters here in South Africa.  My Dad had 2 of them at one stage, and they sure produced a very clean sample.

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Gary----

see if you can find out anymore on the above picture of the Farmall Regular.  (location, date, etc??)

The operator very much resembles my daddy-------who traveled 16 southeastern states or IHC promoting the mighty  Farmall Regular after selling his original dealership herein Greenville, Mississippi. They did alot of demonstrations back in those days

Nose, mouth, ears, body,feet all resemble Daddy too much-------I have seen that same bite in the lips and squinted eyes many a time.  Hard to tell how tall this man is with all of the clothes.  He was stocky and approximately 5-11 in height.  Always liked a big hat???????

Interesting.

 

DD

874729855_FarmerpullingaheavydutywagonwithhisIHCFarmallRegular.jpg.67c6d02b6c35b84408f3101fba50f139.jpg

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I thought this story might interest Roger! I extracted it from my favorite Montana site on Facebook. I never knew any tractor company would award a tractor and plow as a prize and ship it through the Dakotas to Montana?

"Shields Valley farmer Charles Bridgman standing on the “Big Four” kerosene-powered tractor that he and Joe Nash won in a contest in Minneapolis, Minnesota at the Northwestern Land Show for the best wheat in the Northwest in 1912. The engine and twelve plows were shipped to Clyde Park (Montana) on a Northern Pacific Railway flat car. But in practice, the huge tractor and plows proved to be too large for Shields Valley sidehills. So the farmers sold the engine and plows, and Bridgman used his portion of the proceed to invest in more land, enlarging their ranch."

1503557744_CharlesBridgmanstandingontheBigFourkerosene-poweredtractorthatheandJoeNashwoninacontestinMinneapolisMinnesota.thumb.jpg.f975c6f2316c77de4bf6e321186e119d.jpg

Anson, There wasn't any information with that Farmall Regular. It wasn't even identified as a McCormick-Deering Farmall Regular. Many people just post photos. I'll see if I can locate where it got it a while back? Don't hold your breath though. Wouldn't that be something if that was your dad? I know his Regulars had (added?) exhaust pipes on the "liver color" muffler and side exhaust. It's certainly a possibility! I know it is NOT an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm.  Gary😮

806773536_FarmerpullingaheavydutywagonwithhisIHCFarmallRegular.jpg.49e5e15d24eab38d3721ce2cbdb09e89.jpg

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