Jump to content

IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

Recommended Posts

Drawbar pull and flotation (less ground pressure) were always something I liked about the crawlers.  You just had to be patient with the slower speeds.

I cobbled together a 3 pt hitch for the 14 in the spring of '73--------similar year to this year with high River and lots of seep water.

Could not keep a rubber tired tractor on top of the ground.  I pulled my hipper for rowing up the cotton ground with the TD-14----------she would walk on top of the crust.  Would make a pass with the hipper---------on next pass (going opposite direction); water would be seeping into the furrows from the previous pass.

I was the only tractor in the field for miles around--------got my cotton planted on time and made a helluva crop.  Similar situation this year-------see some of the rubber tracks running where the wheel tractors can't go.

I imagine speeds were about the same for the 14 and 18-----4th was whirling alot of iron beneath you.  3rd sounded much better.

edit:  these new fangled rubber tracks move along just as fast as the wheeled tractors-----smooth and quiet

Lots of changes through the years.

 

DD

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know one darn thing, so I'll post some stuff from mostly Facebook and a couple from Ebay.

This Boy is all smiles on his new IH Farmall pedal tractor.

88809558_BoyonIHFarmallpedaltractorebay.thumb.jpg.80860591ed05750834cfe2dc80e04a88.jpg

An IHC Type B (guessing, Roger!) moving a large building

724115898_IHCtypeBMogultractorpullingmovingsmallbarnebay.thumb.jpg.af186b91a280823b757de385acc04a81.jpg

This is a Farmall Regular in Iowa.

170374473_IHCMcCormickDeeringFarmallRegularonIowaFarmebay.thumb.jpg.3602770ffa8dec049df809664dd959bf.jpg

This is a young man on a Farmall F-12, steel on back and rubber in front.

1140969454_ManonIHCFarmallF-12steelrearrubberfrontebay.thumb.jpg.48fdf1f7176107ed4d13f00319365b20.jpg

You corn country guys can analyze this picture for us. I think this Farmall F-12 is planting corn??

226266209_ManplantingcornmaybecropinNavaroTexasonIHCFarmallF-12withhomemadecanopy1937.thumb.png.4d146ab1732374d790a84d38b2b711dd.png

From Ebay is this gray McCormick-Deering WD-40 was (is?) selling on ebay for $13,600, when I downloaded the photo.

338915604_McCormickDeeringIHCWD-40Grayonrubber13600ebay.thumb.jpg.ed0c23829c60240d3404912e7e7601aa.jpg

The same seller is selling this ID-40. I can't say that I've seen an Industrial in the "Forty" lineup. This one was selling at $15,300 at the time I downloaded the picture.

552426723_McCormickDeeringIHCID-40industrialWD-40ebay15300.thumb.jpg.adbdb31543d4cb665eba1bfcaf686ede.jpg

I'd love to have one of these C-1 IHC pickups like this. Our neighbor's hired man had one and I lusted over it as a small boy. My friend on Facebook, Sam Moore posted this pickup. He and I "met" when I used to write for Farm Collector Magazine. He has, or used to have an article, every issue. I don't know if he still does or not? 

1271885780_A1936IHCInternationalC-1pick-upearningitskeepSamMoore.jpg.8d159d9dc89295ddffaf580b85772abf.jpg

Last, but not least... a ca. 1937 D-model IHC "semi tractor" pulling a trailer. I need help identifying it. Is it a D-40 or a D-50, or was it even rated as such? Gary?

ca 1937 IH D-40 or D-50 semi tractor and trailer.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I struck the motherlode in my Craigslist browsing today, finding all three in one local search! I kinda like the looks of the fuel truck although it's got some rust problems. I think it's a '53,  the red one is a '55,  two tone is 1954, all three RC180s. Never drove one but did spend a summer in a similar snub nosed Chevy.

00A0A_7vZRlR0hK5G_1200x900.jpg

00f0f_k6zoe0FTrRp_1200x900.jpg

00e0e_a6Po1V5AK5X_1200x900.jpg

Edited by Bleedinred
  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sam Moore does indeed still write for Farm Collector. FC and RPM are the only magazines I get anymore. I like FC because they write about many different topics, not just tractors, not that they are a bad thing. Sam's last article was about using dynamite. When were you involved Gary?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, 12_Guy said:

Sam Moore does indeed still write for Farm Collector. FC and RPM are the only magazines I get anymore. I like FC because they write about many different topics, not just tractors, not that they are a bad thing. Sam's last article was about using dynamite. When were you involved Gary?

The last article I wrote in Farm Collector was July 2010, 12_Guy. I've written for steam magazines intermittently since I was 12 years old. It blows a whole evening for me, way past my bedtime, to write an article and gather the photos for it and off to the publisher. I've gotten either, lazy or selfish? I used to mail the articles (and photos, hoping to get them back) in an envelope, but it did get a little easier being able to email them. 

Ogden Publishing (Farm Collector) bought out Iron Men Album, a steam magazine started in the late 1940's. They wanted to change the name. The Editor asked for my input and he used part of my input in selecting a new name for that magazine; Steam Traction. He had it named, Traction Engine, and I told him, if you don't include the word "Steam" you'll lose your readers. Ogden was in it for the $$$$$$$, which old steam guys like me aren't big spenders on those types of things, over the subscription price. So they dropped Steam Traction and pushed Farm Collector which has a much broader reader appeal. They wanted me to write steam articles, to retain the Steam Traction audience. I told them I'd contribute, but not be a steady (Like Sam Moore!).  Gary?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to pick up the monthly edition of Farm Collector at my drug store------then they dropped their newsstand.  Never have been a subscriber--------but still read ocassionally whenever I see one to pick up.

Do remember seeing several of Gary's articles in past years.  (probably contributed to me calling him "the Professor"----------not much he doesn't know about)

******

Like your old truck pictures Bleedinred.

In the mid-'50s---------our Washington County 4-H club leader came up with a  used single axle 160 (like those) with a small single axle livestock trailer.  We had it painted up and rode to the livestock shows in style.!!!!?  (6 cylinder with a 5 speed-------long, tall shift stick)

 

DD

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Slow day here in Mississippi today------(my clutch seems to be slipping).

Anyway--------been watching the Lewis and Clark expedition on the history channel.  They failed to show the Gates to the Mountains in the documentary-----but I showed the Professor's pictures to my wife.  She was impressed.

I also always wondered how they navigated back to St. Louis (that couldn't have been an easy trip either).

 

DD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

Slow day here in Mississippi today------(my clutch seems to be slipping).

Anyway--------been watching the Lewis and Clark expedition on the history channel.  They failed to show the Gates to the Mountains in the documentary-----but I showed the Professor's pictures to my wife.  She was impressed.

I also always wondered how they navigated back to St. Louis (that couldn't have been an easy trip either).

 

DD

I think Lewis and Clark, on their way home, chose to have Captain Wm. Clark follow the Yellowstone until its confluence with the Missouri in what would become North Dakota? Captain Lewis went by way of the Missouri River, the way in which they came. They probably just agreed to "go with the flow," Anson? ?

The only visible proof that the Lewis and Clark Expedition even happened today is this carving of Wm Clark's name into the sandstone of Pompey's Pillar east of Billings, Montana, on July 25, 1806. It is now covered in glass so it can't be vandalized, since there are more graffiti carvings on Pompey's pillar.

148160578_PompeysPillarWmClarksignature1806.jpg.762532097e59c16ad8377e63acbfe68f.jpg

When Farmall Kid was a "kid" and we lived in Billings for nearly four years, he belonged to a young boy's group called "YMCA Indian Guides." Since their title included "Indian," they were contacted by someone who was with a special train with a VIP passenger car included, that Wm. Clark's Great, Great (don't remember how many "greats"?) Grandson would be in that car. They needed someone sending smoke signals from the top of it. I'd never had any experience with smoke signals. We had a wet blanket and lots of green pine needles. Pine needles make the white, "steam like" smoke needed. We had a good bonfire going and the train signaled, quite a ways east so we'd be alert. When they got near the train slowed, and we threw bunches of the bull pine needles into the fire and I have no idea what was said, but we sent Clark's relative smoke signals!

977828791_PompeysPillarwithteepee.jpg.4ea31f8bd794dd9b877b4df808ca4a2f.jpg

"Pompey" is derived from Sacajawea's and Toussaint Charbonneau's child, nicknamed "Pompey." His real name was Jean Baptiste Charbonneau. I know I've reported this before, but it's been a while ago. And us old guys forget things, don't we, Anson?  Gary?

PS: I was always fascinated with this painting of Charles M. Russell's of Lewis and Clark's contingent at the Mandan camp in Dakota country for their first winter, before finding the water passage to the Pacific Ocean. They had a black man with them named York (we have the town of York here in the Helena Valley, near the Missouri River, for York's namesake) and Russell's depiction shows the Mandan Indians trying to rub the "black" off of York.

Bladl man York by Charles M Russell.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

l have a question for the professor. One of the Facebook groups l'm in is about Texas history and they are always showing old pics. Someone posted this one of a steam traction engine in a cotton field somewhere in south central Texas and asked what kind it was. That stirred up a bunch of comments but no real answers. Just wondering if there's enough showing in the pic to tell what it is. Regardless, it sure does look small.

 

Buffalo-Springfield tractor.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, twostepn2001 said:

l have a question for the professor. One of the Facebook groups l'm in is about Texas history and they are always showing old pics. Someone posted this one of a steam traction engine in a cotton field somewhere in south central Texas and asked what kind it was. That stirred up a bunch of comments but no real answers. Just wondering if there's enough showing in the pic to tell what it is. Regardless, it sure does look small.

 

Buffalo-Springfield tractor.jpg

That is one nice looking single cylinder Buffalo Pitts engine pulling a Monarch tender, twostepn2001... Gary?

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, TroyDairy said:

I see that Case dbl compound went for $13000.  Wow

I'm not surprised, TroyDairy. It was so scarce, and complete with original equipment that if it needed a new boiler, it'd still be in the correct ballpark. It is a single compound. It's almost an oxymoron, since it does have double or two cylinders. High pressure and low pressure, but they're rated by the number of connecting rods and crank journals. This 40 hp Gaar Scott that I got to engineer in 2010 at Forest City Iowa, while staying at the Byrne Bed and Breakfast in Racine, Minnesota, is a "double tandem compound." It has two connecting rods and crankshaft journals. And, it has four cylinders. Two high pressure (in front) and two low pressure cylinders in the rear. I grew up with this engine when it was at the Tyler farm at Moore (Eddies Corner), Montana. I was about a sixth grader the first time I saw it.

1360713346_40GaarScottdoubletandemcompoundengine.thumb.JPG.f3b81df597a6719de6bf8cfa112fc29a.JPG

I rode on it the first time the Tyler's steamed it after Charlie Tyler's passing in 1956. My late friend Walter F. Mehmke was engineer and is standing on the side water tank working on something.

643751030_40hpGaarScottTylersSeptember1956.thumb.jpg.3bb52198f41b44e6019268f82e447d16.jpg

A friend took this photo of me standing beside the 40 hp Gaar Scott in 1958. Gary?

1557804569_40Gaar-ScottatTylersnearMoore1958GaryYaeger.thumb.jpg.941a07c6729b7f4c84591b642f90ad64.jpg

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's a unique carving of Wm Clark's signature in the rock--------much better kerchief than my signature on paper.

I found it ironic that Clark moved on to bigger an better things after the expedition-------while Lewis apparently hit the bottle hard and committed suicide just 2 or 3 years after completing the expedition.

Never know what's going on in a man's mind.

The Missouri River does alot of meandering in Montana before heading southeasterly toward St. Louis.  Following the various rivers from their headwaters is always interesting to me.

I might have a small advantage with my use of satelite maps versus the explorers.

Gotta tip my hat to the explorers and frontiersman to be able to find their way as well as they did-------with no more to work with than they had.?

 

DD

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

-------while Lewis apparently hit the bottle hard and committed suicide just 2 or 3 years after completing the expedition.

Just the other day l saw  TV show that said Lewis was murdered instead of committing suicide. So.....after watching for an hour seeing all the "evidence", it was  still inconclusive how he died. l guess it's just another conspiracy theory like the JFK assassination, fake moon landing and the Titanic didn't really sink. And oh yeah, the cold war was just a cover up for UFO's by the Russians and the USA!   lol 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My cousin sent me this pic on Facebook and l thought OBG might be interested since it happened in Montana.  Here is the caption for the pic:

LIGHTNING KILLED Nine Horses, and the horse at right was still smoldering. In July 1901, William I. Hughes was hauling wool to Fort Benton in North-central Montana. Hughes had stepped off the lead wagon to put on his rain slicker when a lightning bolt killed all eight of his work horses and his saddle horse, Nellie. Hughes was stunned, but not seriously injured! The Montana Historical Society tells us that this picture was taken the next day, surprising since the saddle horse Nellie, or the saddle itself, was still smoldering. Fort Benton, Montana.JPG

  • Sad 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

82° here in Mississippi right now-----bright sunny skies.  Lots of Corn up-----few soybeans peeking out.  Big rain coming through weekend as tail end of storm pushing across midwest.

*****

Don't reckon me nor TwoStep can prove anything on Lewis's death---------neither one of us wuz there.  Probably read from another source and get one more story!!!!

May be that "fake news" has been around along time????

 

DD

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think I've posted this before? About a month ago, I was dropping popcorn alongside the reclining seat of my recliner. I know I'd made a mess, so I looked underneath it and the popcorn wasn't there.....? There was a flap on the back of the chair that has four snaps along the sides of the chair and velcro under the bottom of the chair. I put my hand on the bottom of the chair and felt something. I started exploring how that back opened up. What I felt was the $40 Buck pocket knife I got for my 70th birthday. It's been missing for nearly a year. I told Farmall kid, if he saw it setting on something I may have been working on to put it on the table in the shop. But... I hadn't remembered using it as of recent. I'd lost several 4" "crescent" adjustable wrenches. I always use the early kind that had the screw in the roller-screw, adjuster. I take the screw out and you can pull the upper jaw out and file another slot into on the end of the adjustment slots already in it. That way, when I put them back together, they'll open up to a 9/16" wrench, instead of just a 1/2" wrench. The current (late) style, has a pressed in pin, so you can't take the wrench apart. Fingernail clippers are slippery too. These "tools" had all fallen out of my pockets while I was taking naps! At least now, when something important goes missing, I'll have another place to look! Gary?

1980964383_Toolsetc.foundinmyreclinerchairMarch2019.thumb.jpg.fe60b83a6d32ae223be846019e228376.jpg

 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome to the "old codger" club Professor.  Seems that I spend more time looking for lost items than I do working.

Under the recliner is a good place to find most anything.

Funny story-------15+ years ago, we had a young tom cat that the grandchildren named Stuff.  He was just a young cat and my wife allowed him to come inside ocassionally.  He was extremely well behaved inside-------but carried on a raging "cat war" with an older (and full size tom cat outside).  Stuff was always getting whipped------but kept going back for more the next day.

Stuff came up missing for two or three days--------we could not find him.

I was sitting in the hall working on my wife's computer one night when I felt something rubbing against my leg.  Felt down-------and it was Stuff (but had no idea where he had come from).  His face was clawed and battered so that he could barely open his eyes.  (apparently one of the grandchildren had let him inside when they were here)

I fed him and gave him some water------and he slowly moved back to his secluded hide out under my big recliner!!!!!

He eventually grew enough to put enough of a whipping on the other tom cat that the other cat left with his tail tucked between his legs.   Ol'  Stuff remained the boss around here for years------we still see his coloration in our current cats (several generations down the line).

Moral of this story:  be careful looking under the recliner--------you might find most anything!!!!??

 

Glad you found your pocket knife.

DD

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

54 minutes ago, Howard_P said:

On the newer crescent wrenches, you can remove enough of the thread on the top of the wheel with a dremel tool to permit it to open to 9/16 without having to take it apart.

Good thinking, Howard_P! That makes perfect sense! Gary?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Facebook Friend Sam Moore says he's doing an article for Farm Collector Magazine about the Red Baby IHC trucks. He posted this drawing of one, and it's entitled "SPRING." Speaking of spring, it snowed here all morning today.

1139715825_RedBabyIHCSPRINGTruckSamMoore.thumb.jpg.eecc489758d361706313c026b6a12498.jpg

This is a ca 1937 D-30 IH truck with the steam engine's water tank mounted on the box. The crew must be heading in at the end of the day, or at dinner time?

616170735_ThreshingcrewonIHCD-30truckwithCasewatertankmountedforthesteamengineDavidFuller.thumb.jpg.62f4032a7f2a96fc0def8e16eb4ce26c.jpg

I sure don't understand this truck at all. It's likely about a K-8 IH truck pulling a trailer. I've never seen one with no chrome at all on the front end. A KB-8 would have chrome all over the front end. Would it have been a late WWII prototype design? I'm baffled.

1289253938_KB-8maybepullingtrailerearlynochrometypeorUSArmytypeduringWWII.jpg.97833bbfde6994a553a8376d1696deeb.jpg

This is a color advertisement for the second model Cub Cadet tractors.

 768055146_122IHCubtractoradvertisementwithmower12hpDavidFuller.jpg.a086a5cc81ce0a150985207f6d888a32.jpg

This was an IHC Titan tractor on a Prony brake at Winnipeg over a hundred years ago, checking the brake horsepower.

1982791723_IHCTitantractoronthePronyBrakeatWinnipegAlbertaCanada1910DavidFuller.jpg.2d2b36fb3d1945536825c9031b5c7de6.jpg

This Farmall Regular belonged to Sam Moore's father. Their hired man is on it in 1943.

809514053_SamMooresdadhadthisIHCFarmallF-30thathishiredmanisonca1943.thumb.jpg.b1a0eb9fc958af0b99e487b290a28813.jpg

Here's a Farmall F-20 powering a sawmill.

1446456224_IHCFarmallF-20poweringasawmillDavidFuller.thumb.jpg.48abe931f638ff2c1cfe74275d3708e2.jpg

Here is a special IH tractor at work near the White house.

384370919_AnIHCtractordoingsomeimportanthighlevelwork.jpg.bbdbf44aa6fbe0276367d706743e4717.jpg

Here is a T-40 gas or kerosene tractor logging.

772348118_McCormickDeeringIHCT-40gasTracTracTorloggingDavidFuller.thumb.jpg.5788f1f1e73fc63c6ecbd024cebf9ea6.jpg

Uncle Audie bought this TD-40 of ours, that had also been a logging tractor at Forest Grove, Montana. Audie gave it its second rebuild. It was sold new in 1936. It was rebuilt during WWII under the Blue Ribbon McCormick Deering program, putting it back to "like new." It went back to the woods and was worn out again, when Audie bought it in 1950. He rebuilt it from the crank to the hitch pin again that year. Of the four TD-40's we had, this one is the best.

840246929_MikeonFredTD-40McCormickDeeringTracTracTorwith15hpCase5-25-18.thumb.jpg.74b2ed785af46f1b31d28510dce68fcd.jpg

This is another photo showing the IH Farmall H and Farmall F-12 a couple of years ago when we were threshing at Farmall Kid's place. They are IH Tractors on a Montana Farm.

1374727005_CaseWaterTankWagonAnnieFarmallHIHFarmallF-1220hpReevesDarleneBitzphoto8-20-17.thumb.jpg.69e301e4b4fc45e05446302830cdcda0.jpg

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

Facebook Friend Sam Moore says he's doing an article for Farm Collector Magazine about the Red Baby IHC trucks. He posted this drawing of one, and it's entitled "SPRING." Speaking of spring, it snowed here all morning today.

1139715825_RedBabyIHCSPRINGTruckSamMoore.thumb.jpg.eecc489758d361706313c026b6a12498.jpg

This is a ca 1937 D-30 IH truck with the steam engine's water tank mounted on the box. The crew must be heading in at the end of the day, or at dinner time?

616170735_ThreshingcrewonIHCD-30truckwithCasewatertankmountedforthesteamengineDavidFuller.thumb.jpg.62f4032a7f2a96fc0def8e16eb4ce26c.jpg

I sure don't understand this truck at all. It's likely about a K-8 IH truck pulling a trailer. I've never seen one with no chrome at all on the front end. A KB-8 would have chrome all over the front end. Would it have been a late WWII prototype design? I'm baffled.

1289253938_KB-8maybepullingtrailerearlynochrometypeorUSArmytypeduringWWII.jpg.97833bbfde6994a553a8376d1696deeb.jpg

This is a color advertisement for the second model Cub Cadet tractors.

 768055146_122IHCubtractoradvertisementwithmower12hpDavidFuller.jpg.a086a5cc81ce0a150985207f6d888a32.jpg

This was an IHC Titan tractor on a Prony brake at Winnipeg over a hundred years ago, checking the brake horsepower.

1982791723_IHCTitantractoronthePronyBrakeatWinnipegAlbertaCanada1910DavidFuller.jpg.2d2b36fb3d1945536825c9031b5c7de6.jpg

This Farmall Regular belonged to Sam Moore's father. Their hired man is on it in 1943.

809514053_SamMooresdadhadthisIHCFarmallF-30thathishiredmanisonca1943.thumb.jpg.b1a0eb9fc958af0b99e487b290a28813.jpg

Here's a Farmall F-20 powering a sawmill.

1446456224_IHCFarmallF-20poweringasawmillDavidFuller.thumb.jpg.48abe931f638ff2c1cfe74275d3708e2.jpg

Here is a special IH tractor at work near the White house.

384370919_AnIHCtractordoingsomeimportanthighlevelwork.jpg.bbdbf44aa6fbe0276367d706743e4717.jpg

Here is a T-40 gas or kerosene tractor logging.

772348118_McCormickDeeringIHCT-40gasTracTracTorloggingDavidFuller.thumb.jpg.5788f1f1e73fc63c6ecbd024cebf9ea6.jpg

Uncle Audie bought this TD-40 of ours, that had also been a logging tractor at Forest Grove, Montana. Audie gave it its second rebuild. It was sold new in 1936. It was rebuilt during WWII under the Blue Ribbon McCormick Deering program, putting it back to "like new." It went back to the woods and was worn out again, when Audie bought it in 1950. He rebuilt it from the crank to the hitch pin again that year. Of the four TD-40's we had, this one is the best.

840246929_MikeonFredTD-40McCormickDeeringTracTracTorwith15hpCase5-25-18.thumb.jpg.74b2ed785af46f1b31d28510dce68fcd.jpg

This is another photo showing the IH Farmall H and Farmall F-12 a couple of years ago when we were threshing at Farmall Kid's place. They are IH Tractors on a Montana Farm.

1374727005_CaseWaterTankWagonAnnieFarmallHIHFarmallF-1220hpReevesDarleneBitzphoto8-20-17.thumb.jpg.69e301e4b4fc45e05446302830cdcda0.jpg

 

In the background of the Whitehouse pic, looks like a Loadstar but can't tell what its setup is. Great pics, thanks.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...