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Old Binder Guy

IH Tractors on Montana Farm

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I have four grease guns ! They seem to attract Rats & Mice.

       But I keep looking for a Deer, Elk, or Buffalo in my back yard some morning.   I have scored a Deer recently ,Sal , my right arm man did bring aJ.D. 4440 from the other  ranch and parked it near the shop where I can see it while I prepare my morning coffee.

  If Ray54 will shoo one of those Bull Elks this way , Don't think they are dumb enough to leave his beautiful area and head out to the heat , Unless they like Almonds. lol.

     Tony

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7 hours ago, Tonyinca said:

Sal , my right arm man did bring aJ.D. 4440 from the other  ranch and parked it near the shop where I can see it while I prepare my morning coffee.

l still think you ought to spiff that 4440 up a little and add it to your "collection".....    :rolleyes:

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On 10/28/2018 at 6:02 PM, Delta Dirt said:

Funny how the great grease gun conversation made me more aware of grease guns this afternoon while working (piddling) at the shop.

I must confess------I have more than a couple.  No telling how many I might find if I ever get around to going through the plunder in my old shop building.

But it will never be such a number to attract the elk------like apparently happens up in Montana.😉

 

DD

Never say never,20 years ago I never thought there would be elk around here.When I was about 10 a little pig went running across the wheat field, never new what a problem they would become. Mt lions protected, coyotes getting thicker fleas, just had a bear go across the ranch to get his picture taken in the day lite.

 

By now will not surprise me to have wolfs  here in the next 20 years. 

No matter how thick the elk get I will probably never be able to get a tag to shoot one. At this point they don't want to know how many are around ,then no management and anti hunting crowd is happy. 

 

Oh the fine city folk that think all wildlife is cute and cuddly. What damage could they do.

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twostepn2001, I bumped onto this YouTube of a 75 hp Case engine pulling a plow. It'll give you an idea of what you're looking at in your photo. As I'd said, your photo is of an "in the crack" Case of either 25 hp or 75 hp. They at that time were the same engine, depending on which brass tag was on the right side of the smokebox. Hopefully, it will make your heart rate raise a couple beats per minute? Gary😀

https://youtu.be/7qhGiibgLuY

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Great close up video of the Case steamer Gary------she was "huffing and puffing like a freight train".   John Deere must have patterned the sound of their two cylinder engines after the big steam engines???😊

Following your 75 hp Case video was a video from Oklahoma of a 40 hp Case demonstrating climbing the incline ramp.  (I believe the engineer was Carl ? from Michigan)

Once I viewed it-----I lost it and could not pull it back up.  It's another neat video if someone runs across it-----take a  look.  It's impressive when in balance on the incline ramp.

 

DD

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2 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

Great close up video of the Case steamer Gary------she was "huffing and puffing like a freight train".   John Deere must have patterned the sound of their two cylinder engines after the big steam engines???😊

Following your 75 hp Case video was a video from Oklahoma of a 40 hp Case demonstrating climbing the incline ramp.  (I believe the engineer was Carl ? from Michigan)

Once I viewed it-----I lost it and could not pull it back up.  It's another neat video if someone runs across it-----take a  look.  It's impressive when in balance on the incline ramp.

 

DD

Anson, I don't know if John Deere and JI Case were in cahoots or not, on their sounds? Harley Davidson filed a lawsuit against Valkyrie motorcycle company in Japan, for copying the "packa, packa, packa, packa" sound Harley's make. I never heard how that turned out?

The "Carl" on the incline at Pawnee is my late friend Carl Tuttle of Howell, Michigan. Carl set the valves on our Case steam engine, back about 1990. Carl's late son, Kim Tuttle is at the wheel of this little Case engine and Carl is on this nearside at the throttle and reverse lever.

1434497664_CarlTuttleonCaseInclineatPawneeGregTuttle.jpg.69ec5fbe279ff6981aa0758cc65abfbc.jpg

I'd put in a new piston rod and a new valve rod. He and Austin Monk dropped in as I was assembling things. I had the equipment and gauges to set the valves, but Carl was so familiar with that project, that he just grabbed it and did it. Carl used to fly out to Kalispell every fall to help out Austin Monk at our local show there. I took this photo of Carl, Austin and Kenneth Kelley, one of the principle people of the Pawnee, Oklahoma show. It's hard for me to believe the three men in the photo are all gone. Carl died at the Pawnee, Oklahoma show this past summer.

740323426_CarlTuttleAustinMonkKennethKelley2003NWAPA.jpg.79abc5e692381c8306fb697c1fc1342f.jpg

Kenneth was a "real" Case steam engine man. He died just weeks after I took this photo at Kalispell. Thankfully, he was hanging around me and our Case engine, helping grease and bring firewood. Before parade time, I said, "Kenneth I need to drive the Model TT Truck through the parade. Do you think you could run the Case through the parade?" He lit up like a small child. I think that was the last time he ever fired a steam engine? This photo below is a picture of the Case engines Kenneth and his brother owned, and some of those went to the Pawnee show each year.  Gary🙂

I think I got the correct YouTube video below, Anson.

1987434353_CaseSteamenginesKennethKelleysCollection.thumb.jpg.f76a727a7b4dc81c8ca1e7cc6efaac4c.jpg

https://video.search.yahoo.com/search/video?fr=tightropetb&p=case+steam+engine+on+incline+pawnee#id=2&vid=5e89f298076039e055860052993ea9b4&action=click

Heck, Anson, there's even video of Mike and me on the "Case incline" at Silver Creek there!

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Not to change the subject but I made a little bit of progress on cosmetics. This is about 6 coats of paint and roughly 10 coats of clear followed by a little wet sanding with 1500 grit and some light rubbing compound. 

Still have lots to do on finishing the bed and other "additions". 

IMG_5562.JPG

IMG_5563.JPG

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Truck is looking good Hammer.

******

That's the video------and I remember seeing your threesome picture being posted before.

Got to thinking about the Michigan address--------I may have closer steam connections than you realize.

A number of years ago------somebody in Michigan was looking for a set of brake shoes for a Tulsa winch for use in loading his 50,000 lbs steamer onto his lowboy.

Don't remember the name nor address-------but I shipped him a pair of brake shoes that I had removed from my Tulsa winch when switching it to a hydraulic drive.  Am thinking the contact came from the Smokstak forum????

So--------I am more experienced with steam traction engines than I realized.

 

DD

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I don't know a darn thing. I did get these photos from Facebook. A 20-75 rear mounted Nichols & Shepard steam engine pulling against an IH TD-14 in Missouri in 1954.

1627605914_NS25-90TD-14IH2.jpg.4f066b2d1034c3b65e1f560bbfde43ed.jpg

This is a "extended cab" IH semi truck pulling a trailer.

1988822637_InternationalIHCTruckandtrailerDesMoinesIowaRichardThomas.jpg.786868d36066693b90e16c99cddaea4b.jpg

An IHC Type Ca Mogul plowing. (Thanks Roger!)

2033972333_IHCTypeCMogulplowingebay_edited-1.thumb.jpg.bac3a1ff99242d22b072487cc8e98aec.jpg

And this last one is really neat. IHC Titan tractors, Shovel nose trucks and an Avery return flue steam engine back behind at a neighboring building. Gary😉

245775292_IHCFarmmachineryTitanTractorsshovelnosetrucksAveryreturnfluefullebay.jpg.825a49914591ffbbcba18dfa83463b3d.jpg

 

 

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Who won the tug of war between the TD-14 and the Nichols and Sheppard??

That was probably a pretty good match up on drawbar pull--------although I note some dirt at the rear of the tracks on the crawler (not a good sign for the 14)?????

Seems like in the old days all of the farm labor down this way always thought their tractor would out pull the rest------no matter what the spec's or Nebraska tests showed.

More than one instance of a F-30 dragging an M around the farm yard-----impressive to a young kid.  I now realize the F-30 had some advantage from drawbar height------and never considered weights or ballast.

edit:   I looked up drawbar pull for the M and F-30 on Tractor Data.  They  were  rated pretty even.   The M had only a 100---150 lb advantage (both in the4200---4300 lb range-------even though the M carried several more horsepower).

 

DD

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I recall Grandpa tell about guys having pull offs between some of those old monsters ,thinking Rumley oil pulls were the example tho...anyway the story went when some of these pull offs were held something in the drive train usually broke putting the broken machine in a scrappers sites.... Was thinking this was happening at shows and when they were old enough for parts to be long out of production and before anbody  had the determination to make new parts from scratch.

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Down here-----the "tug of wars" usually took place when the "bossman" was not around.  (being that the bossman knew what the consequences and expenses might be-----as pointed out by Iowaboy)

You have to take into consideration the mindset of our Mississippi Delta labor force at that time.

The last tug of war that I remember hearing about happened at one of my neighbors-------right after the delivery of a brand new IH tractor (the same day).

Don't remember whether it was 806s or 1206s-------but "aint no way the new one could out pull my old tractor".

Anyway------my buddy (owner and bossman came driving up to his shop to see the two tractors tied together clawing and pawing gravel with the rest of farm hands cheering on the sidelines.

When Jimmy got through reading them the riot act--------I don't think there have been anymore tractor tug of wars in the local area!!!!!😳😅

I always found that it cost enough to try to keep them running in the field or on the highway!!!!🙄

 

DD

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I have a question for Roger... This old gas tractor at right on the belt barn threshing has the Facebook crowd stumped.

478988126_Reevesboottopsmokestackengineintownebay.jpg.c9562d65392cbc5b742e56ce6c8857f0.jpg

Here's the side view of the tractor, with the Reeves steam engine threshing. Gary😉

569044021_IHCMogulTypeCandReevesboottopsmokestackengineonbeltebay.thumb.jpg.93e02858b5ceb92896dec4c45c6563be.jpg

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Well Gary, it's not too tough to identify that tractor, it is a York built by the Flinchbaugh Mfg. Co. in York Pennsylvania.  Production ran from 1905 until 1915.  They built them in many sizes from 2HP to 40HP.    They had a unique system to reversing the engine so you didn't have to stop it to change the direction of its rotation.  There is at least one of the larger tractors in the form of a road roller and a few of the very small ones that still exist.

york-gas-engines-tractor-flinchbaugh_1_b8f2aec36659842e78c917f69f70b423.thumb.jpg.2c38ed0a4acdad87b606365cad744f71.jpg

GEM_V34_I10_Oct_1999_06-9.jpg.7e6c8beb4b5c0d9c67a219a10f2c9c0f.jpg

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4234641870_a2d2da66c3_b.thumb.jpg.5596d044086cb613f1a78a9c79f6e653.jpg

 

 

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18 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

Down here-----the "tug of wars" usually took place when the "bossman" was not around.  (being that the bossman knew what the consequences and expenses might be-----as pointed out by Iowaboy)

You have to take into consideration the mindset of our Mississippi Delta labor force at that time.

The last tug of war that I remember hearing about happened at one of my neighbors-------right after the delivery of a brand new IH tractor (the same day).

Don't remember whether it was 806s or 1206s-------but "aint no way the new one could out pull my old tractor".

Anyway------my buddy (owner and bossman came driving up to his shop to see the two tractors tied together clawing and pawing gravel with the rest of farm hands cheering on the sidelines.

When Jimmy got through reading them the riot act--------I don't think there have been anymore tractor tug of wars in the local area!!!!!😳😅

I always found that it cost enough to try to keep them running in the field or on the highway!!!!🙄

 

DD

Awww.  He's just tall.  That's all.

Ron

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This week I finished up the last job of the year and plowed the oat field. We finally had enough rain. I opened up the field with my IH 60 plow. It’s pretty well worn out but with the hills in the field, I knew I could pull three bottoms with the 560. 48F12D35-A1E7-4171-AFA8-9FE177B3373A.thumb.jpeg.256631a389490866ce3be47c2e42d04a.jpeg

21A7182D-16C8-4F6D-84E7-DD080A7F40AC.thumb.jpeg.b1b84f551205c30b4af6e3d4a081381c.jpeg

This is looking west and only about half of the field is visible. I picked a tree on the horizon and aimed for it to keep a straight line. This field is about 18 acres.

6784A321-5051-4B88-9C2A-5AF352756139.thumb.jpeg.170b8c6216d4557a1f5b3ed41911bf1f.jpeg

No job is complete without a selfie to prove you did it right?  😎

7EADD56D-952C-4776-965E-FC7A77B673FA.thumb.jpeg.e9f35cfe8927ba0db9ce1d70074f9bb8.jpeg

There is a lot of sand in the soil so the plow scours very nicely.  This plow needs the wear surfaces replaced but instead of doing that, I found a Case 4 bottom plow with new cutting edges for $300 which I thought was a good deal. I just didn’t know how the tractor would handle it on my hills.  Well I didn’t have anything to worry about, it pulled just the same as the old plow!  Amazing what new edges and a properly set up plow will do!  I plowed mostly in 2nd high TA but tried it in 3rd and the 560 was able to pull the Case plow just fine.  But that’s pretty fast and the dirt just flings out of the plow!

705AA946-7D9C-49AD-A4EB-63B564D14D6D.thumb.jpeg.fcbcdf05c9db7d5320a8265dd989d0d3.jpeg

DC4498DE-49C8-4ED9-A535-EBC3EB773382.thumb.jpeg.e4895926593b10d2c01b0f28ce2e2832.jpeg

This is looking east from the other end.  There were four Tamerack stumps still in the ground in the area just in front of the tractor which is a real pain.  One had rotted enough to come out of the ground so only three are left.  I guess I should dig around them and cut them off below plow depth. Why they were not dug out I don’t know when the rest of the field was cleared.

E62A0BBC-255A-4DDC-B734-E42EC5BD280F.thumb.jpeg.e66335369e00e10dd45c48607cc5125f.jpeg

And to make sure all of the plows had their chance, I hooked the H to the little JD 2 bottom trip plow. I made several rounds on a short section just for the fun of it. It was slow going but the H was able to handle it. I sure wouldn’t want to have to turn under 80 acres with this setup!

26C2592D-B850-46A7-845B-DEB32E3BCAB8.thumb.jpeg.1f7bebb9f195eb6b5916d56789a47a0a.jpeg

 Back to the starting point but with the work all done. Plowing is my favorite job, it’s a smooth ride and cool temperatures make it comfortable.  Professor, did you plow like this on your farm or was it only with a disk plow?  Work the fields in the fall or just in the spring before planting?  You had a much larger operation then my little piddly farm but I enjoy it.

Thanks for riding along with my IH tractors on a Montana farm!

 

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Strange, that looks like the hitch on my #70 plow, not like the one on my Sons #60.

Ray

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That's a straight furrow Matt------looks like you must have a GPS guidance system on the 560.

******

Back to the Professor's incline video------down below, I saw a video of a Case steamer pulling a sled (then couldn't find it).

Pulled big part of the track with front wheels in the air---------looked like he was going to take the pull sled on home with him!!!

Maybe the Professor can post it up for us-----I could just keep on watching it.

 

DD

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10 hours ago, 664 CDN said:

Strange, that looks like the hitch on my #70 plow, not like the one on my Sons #60.

Ray

Ray, I could be completely wrong.  If you say it looks like a 70 plow, that’s likely what it is then. It has trip bottoms if that helps ID it.  It has a lot more clearance then the Case plow but for what I do, the Case worked perfectly. 

Delta Dirt, no GPS but Dad trained me well. Pick a spot in the distance and don’t look away from it until you get there. With the sidehills and different soil types in the field, my furrow straightness will creep a little after several rounds. 

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MT Matt, these are the only pictures I have on file.

Don,t show the hitch real good.

I may have to take some new ones

Firs one is the # 60  second is  the # 70.

#60 plow (Medium).jpg

#70 plow  12-10-09 (Medium).jpg

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That sure is pretty scenery MT Matt. Nice straight furrows 👍

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Thanks Sledgehammer, I like the view here much better then where I was at in Missouri for the last 25 years!

664, I did a little research and I have a #70 plow. The difference between it and a #60 are the axels. The 70 are on top of the beam for more clearance and the 60 are below. 

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I have a steam "friend" in California. He and I are polar, diametric, opposites politically and it comes out occasionally on Facebook. He ticks me off and I tick him off, but he'll then send me a message, asking a steam question, and I always try to answer him. Well last night he posted something sort of political on Facebook and I had to tell him I agreed with him (for a change). He said, "Tomorrow night (tonight) is going to be a combination of "Christmas Eve" and "the night before your colonoscopy."

MT Matt, I missed what you asked about plowing on the old Lewistown homestead. I'll try to answer with photos. In 1907, Grandpa Yaeger hired a 30-60 Hart Parr "Old Reliable" and 8-bottom plow to break 800 acres of sod. My 8 year old dad rode on the plow and his job was to get off the plow, run ahead and pick up buffalo skulls, put it ahead of where the driver wheel would crush the skull, then get back on the plow.

241816390_Hart-Parrwith8bottomJohnDeereplowimp.thumb.jpg.904e6930f9e9677b71f94b938790b652.jpg

The Yaeger brothers plowed this farmland, and the rest of their farmland, with Emerson disk plows. (Dad said their farmland was too shallow to continually plow it with moldboard plows, so they used disk and "cylinder plows.")They first plowed with horses, then used a 30-60 Aultman Taylor gas tractor later. I couldn't tell you how many plows they pulled with the A&T? (A question I forgot to ask.) This is a 1910 A&T gas tractor, serial number 47.

948989972_PHOTO00015Yaeger30-60AultmanTaylor47cropped.jpg.c62f6db5784e74c4a927641a1467f1f1.jpg

They bought this 20 hp Reeves Highwheeler steam engine in 1917, second hand (one year old) from a neighbor. They also bought his section of farmland.

848700626_20hpReevesHighwheelersmokingYaegerBrothers.thumb.jpg.2c103a49497479301b70d465ac9a0f28.jpg

The Highwheeler was a good engine and my dad loved operating it. I even played on it as a tiny little boy. But it didn't pull enough plows. They pulled four sections of those 6-disk Emerson plows. So they were in the market for a bigger "plowing engine." They traded a team of 4 Percheron horses for a badly worn, needing boiler work 32 hp Reeves cross compound Canadian Special steam engine. They stripped down the boiler from the other parts and repaired the boiler. They put on a new set of gearing, as the old ones "were sharp enough to shave with." My dad has his back to the camera and uncle Charley is on the steersman's platform.

1040446632_Yaegers32Reeves6269DadCharley.thumb.jpg.7b2edd4b362d3fa20d0c50bead3bd602.jpg

They plowed with this engine from 1920 through 1938. 1939 was too wet (A strange phenomenon during the "dirty thirties.") for the big engines in the neighborhood. My dad was always was the steam engineer. They pulled six sections of 6-disk Emerson plows with this engine. They plowed a measured 100 acre field in the 1920's in one day. Dad always marvelled, ".... and we were still in the 'horse & buggy' days." When they finished farming with this engine in 1938, you could shave with the steel gearing on this engine again. (Not too many steam engines wore out two sets of gearing.)

1777669937_YaegerBrosplowing32Reeves6269CrystalLakeRd..thumb.jpg.11aa8b74c0f5dec930df8ede1c6acaff.jpg

In 1934, dad and his brothers bought a used TD-40 McCormick-Deering TracTracTor. They already had Regulars and F-20's, plus 15-30's and 22-36's. After 1938 being too wet for the big (23 tons) steam engines, they started farming with the TD-40 and two IHC "cylinder plows." They got another in 1944, worn out "used" after the B-17 air base runways were constructed in 1943 at Lewistown. It came with a "carry all" or can. Those two TD-40's are the ones pulling out Dad's TD-40 with the Holt dozer, stuck in Beaver Creek in 1951.

1112559872_Three3TD-40sstuckinBeaverCreekBillBobWilliamJoeYaeger1951.thumb.jpg.88cec2bd0987476507120331517c40c7.jpg

By the time I started farming the homestead and the surrounding land, I couldn't operate a couple of TD-40's at a time, so Dad and I bought this 1953 TD-18A. I farmed with it several years. I'd spring plow and the rest of the time, I'd pull a toolbar. Then later add rod weeders and harrows. 

246926715_TD-18Aprimedcabtoolbarrodweedersharrows.jpg.f9f8d096b272d91b19fa1491c2107daf.jpg

After the TD-18, I bought a brand new 806. I pulled these IH "cylinder plows" with it and then used a 20' chisel plow.

1435825617_806plows1100C1968.thumb.jpg.571b952b9482b6e65426b40c4112c7d1.jpg

953904271_IH806Wheatlandplows.jpg.5bb9f45cdb9343ddd9c35fd609d84c76.jpg

The chisel plow.

2084340788_806WheatlandIHRolloflexchiselplow.jpg.20083ff6d060b0219637c829f8c971c2.jpg

Another view of the chisel plow behind the 80, and a (one of three) WD-9 seeding.

1458525302_WD-9806WheatlandatMoore.jpg.a4f7c261976507a0c4625d7e5e3919f5.jpg

I leased the farm for three years in 1969. When I came back, I was an IH partsman for a couple of years. I farmed a couple of years with an IH 660, plus a Case 1030, which had been my father in-law's after he retired.

1789346858_Mikeplowingwith660IHca1976.thumb.jpg.fc0a53fa2b8b8091bd30883d1e8a66da.jpg

1698835384_1030CaseSchafferplowside.jpg.5272231766692effb75a8303d5583fde.jpg

When I got the lease finished, and it was mine, I bought a 4568 and a used 1256 to farm with.

350154765_4568GrandpaLynn1256impcrop.jpg.6ca23b83a93261d1cd11966fdb9f2f98.jpg

I did all chisel plow farming with the 4568. When angle farming the fields I had, I had to sight on something that didn't move, like a cow. And something that was always in view. 

913368598_IH456855chiselplow2.jpg.d9cf3e5d80a7b0dd3dd45f38b3cc9386.jpg

My favorite sighting object was Square Butte (east).

585385617_RoundandSquareButteeastMaryBricker10-6-17.jpg.0175e85ecf137a7a98f01b784a89bf4a.jpg

The 1256 had plenty of duties on the farm. Seeding and snow plowing were two of them.

1330160412_IH1256insnowclothes.jpg.21ea6928cb5b7f50b1c9b71059996cdc.jpg

I bought another TD-18A but didn't use it in the field. I did dam building, repairing, and dirt work with it.

9435481_TD-18A181MIkeShelldozerIH.jpg.ecdeea607f96b6a697021e2333144a27.jpg

Then 1980 came along. I was stretched thin at the bank and he was willing to go another year, but my 19.5% interest (thanks Jimmy) rate could go up even more. I was losing a lease and decided I'd beat the rush getting out of the farm that had been in the family 100 years, when I left there in 1981. I sold and we moved to the Flathead Valley where I retired out of Whitefish School District as Maintenance Chief for 20+ years. Thanks to that, I still get my pension and our health insurance is paid for each month. There's no way we could survive on Social Security, so that school retirement is such a blessing to us. After we moved to Helena to be around son Mike (Farmall Kid) and his family, I still get to go get dusty and think I'm "farming" occasionally. Here seeding with Mike's Farmall M and a (John Deere) Van Brunt drill.

1821271020_SeedingoatstodayIHFarmallMToot5-13-18.thumb.jpg.398529e05a7f7dac3e7b2c199de5ec45.jpg

I even still plow with the TD-40 occasionally, just like when I started plowing with one at age 10, for dad. this is an IH disk plow it's pulling a few years ago.

728466902_TD-40IHCdiskplow9-2-13.thumb.JPG.066aee8fbd4de9cfdd4f844a34be71c4.JPG

This is an IH moldboard plow it's pulling.

2127420800_TD-40TracTracTorMikePlowrear9-16-13.thumb.jpg.e98f44b3de1495929290f8f554ca94e4.jpg

Once in a while, we really revert to the old days. This fall was one of them. Mike and Randy took the 20 hp Reeves across the creek and plowed with it. So I guess this is just about "full circle" in my life MT Matt?  Gary😉  PS: There were a few IH Tractors on a Montana Farm here too?

1128582154_ReevesplowRandyModelTT9-23-18.thumb.jpg.cab3dbc19549db3d253136372dc2d773.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Question for the Professor and maybe Loadstar:

Why was the one-way disker (cylinder plow) so popular out west?

We have always run tandem disk harrows------or for real heavy cutting a tandem offset disk.  Either way------we were double cutting the soil-----moving it one way with the front gangs and the opposite with the rear gangs.

In reality-------it appears that we both are running about the same depths (3---6").

Double offset disk harrow:  (usually 9---12" blade spacings)

20170409_164324.thumb.jpg.9e19b846e6dca44babf0d77b3a8a9641.jpg

 

20170409_164151.thumb.jpg.63de9cd5bae9dd631d172de1be4d1a2a.jpg

 

Tandem disk harrow:  (usually 7---9" blade spacings)

20170729_164804.thumb.jpg.17be7b5db9d3eb8b27ab33c707883fd7.jpg

 

I presume the one way disker allowed hitching the second gang of blades out wider to cut a wider pass (with same number of blades engaging the ground)-------but did you not have to make a second pass to create your seedbed.

Must be differences in soil textures???   Our soils usually takes several passes to create a seed bed with conventional tillage tools.

DD

 

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3 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

Question for the Professor and maybe Loadstar:

Why was the one-way disker (cylinder plow) so popular out west?

We have always run tandem disk harrows------or for real heavy cutting a tandem offset disk.  Either way------we were double cutting the soil-----moving it one way with the front gangs and the opposite with the rear gangs.

 

Must be differences in soil textures???   Our soils usually takes several passes to create a seed bed with conventional tillage tools.

DD

 

We called them "diskers" here and they were about the most popular seeding tool in this area when I was a kid. Multiple hookups of 2 and 3 diskers would cover a lot of ground at seeding time. A once over opeation as the disks turned over the soil, like a plow, only not as deep. Killed all the weeds and set the seed in place. Run across the fields with the diamond harrows after that and you were all set for a good crop. Up til this year my best yielding wheat of all time was planted with the Massey 360 disker in the 1980s. 

Here is a pic of my dad's Case 12 foot model 900 disker with me on the Cockshutt 50 in the spring of 1972. The diskers were not a deep tillage implement. If the ground was hard they would not cut deep enough to cut off the weeds. But if it was loose and well worked you might end up burying the seed in loose soil too deep. 

 

900 Disker 72.jpg

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