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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy
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3 hours ago, Tubacase47 said:

I want it. LOL

 

1 hour ago, Old Binder Guy said:

Tom, I made a note to bring it to the Mehmke steam show. Gary?

Today is his Birthday after all ?

 

a guy could work up a sweat running all those grease guns. 

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In 2 days, the Who's Who in  the Steam Community will gather .

I for one am as excited as a kid on Christmas to finally meet the Professor! And seeing the 150HP Case will be pretty cool too.

 

 

 

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13 hours ago, Raven said:

In 2 days, the Who's Who in  the Steam Community will gather .

I for one am as excited as a kid on Christmas to finally meet the Professor! And seeing the 150HP Case will be pretty cool too.

 

 

 

I'm just as excited to meet you too Emma. I have such respect for you and the steam lineage you represent. I had to grab this picture of your Nachtraub family's ca 1880 Russell portable engine, plus the wooden water tank wagon and archaic hand fed, slat stacker Russell threshing machine. Your information states that "Joe Nachtraub" is on the engine in this tintype. 

1703396762_JoeNachtraub(onengine)Russellportablein1880sHollandOhioEmmaRosetintype.thumb.jpg.c0490153ba7433e5338042a70f65b63b.jpg

And, I'm excited about seeing the brand new 150 hp Case too! Since the Anderson's spent $1.5 mil and 4,000 man hours building it so the rest of the world could see what JI Case built from 1904 to 1906, that they pulled from the market. It was due to poor materials and bearings, plus it had some design flaws that Kory Anderson corrected.

908037824_KoryAndersons160hpCasefromscratchsteamtractor1.5million4000hourstobuildAndoverSouthDakota.thumb.jpg.b49ddefec88e0c275103e660fa9e9112.jpg

Since so many people know we're going to Andover, especially on Facebook, I posted this photo of my wife on the range with her handgun. She's not to be taken lightly! I wouldn't want to be standing in front of her in a bad situation. I'm not worried about leaving her. She locks up the apartment like Fort Knox. She has a double barrel shotgun, with two barrels of .00 buckshot, and a rifle beside the bed. Mike and I take off at noon.

899972397_GrandmaSharonshootingSR22onrange7-3-18.thumb.jpg.967f02608955f3df547ea672a6f22bc3.jpg

Todd, can you imagine being in charge of keeping them full of grease, when somebody else is out there emptying them?

Happy Birthday Tubacase47, you'll probably drive over when we put the steam engines in the shed for the winter, and pick up your birthday present then? Gary?

 

 

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Sure like the 1880's era picture of the steam threshing crew.

Think I may have asked this several years ago---------when did steam engines first enter use on the farms???

******

And-----the picture of "pistol packing Mama" is a good one also.  It is important for the ladies to know how to shoot.

 

DD

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1 hour ago, Delta Dirt said:

Sure like the 1880's era picture of the steam threshing crew.

Think I may have asked this several years ago---------when did steam engines first enter use on the farms???

******

And-----the picture of "pistol packing Mama" is a good one also.  It is important for the ladies to know how to shoot.

 

DD

That can be a loose statement, Anson, about "when did steam engines first enter use on the farms???" My relative, Philander Standish, built a steam plow in 1867, just two short years after the Civil War. Abe Lincoln imagined such equipment being built, in his lifetime.

163796906_PhilanderStandishssteamplowof1867.thumb.jpg.c008bffdfad41645fcb7abef173e6553.jpg

Case #1, I photographed at the Smithsonian, claimed 1869, but others argue it was in the 1870's. It is a portable, horse pulled engine.  And their traction engines came later.

296747958_Casenumber1SmithsonianbyGY1964-2.thumb.jpg.19831e28f92d95ed2c3382ad7540b395.jpg

A Case horse steered traction engine.

2140470392_1883JICasehorsesteeredsteamtractionengine.jpg.a8bb8ecd35a03e9d6354feb5012e77d1.jpg

Later engines like this Nichols & Shepard with wooden wheels. But nobody knows for sure who was first with the farm engines. I've seen some hot arguments over it. Gary?

1739674723_EarlywoodenwheelNicholsShepardthreshingebay.thumb.jpg.b71ceb98172fba9176bb432df719019b.jpg

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First, since hammers was the topic of conversation for a couple of days, thought l'd post a pic of a hammer l bet the "Professor" don't have... :-)

Second, this pic of a steamer showed up in a FB group l'm in. People were saying all kind of things about it. One even said "l bet it has a 1000 horsepower!! Look how big it is!!" Well, l know two things about it...it ain't no 1000 hp and it's a J l Case. Anyway, exactly what size is it?  l'm guessing it's powering a thresher, but does that belt seem a bit tight?

 

hammer.JPG

Texas steamer.JPG

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Safe travels Gary. That would be an interesting and exciting trip.  It’s rare a person gets a chance to basically step back in time and witness the operation of something basically gone from this earth. 

I looked in the Toy House for the hammer brand that you are fond of. I was able to find four with the rings, a couple newer blue handled versions and what appears to be one older hammer without the rings. Dad had several hammers but nothing like the collection of the Hammer Man!

21CD4078-6237-418C-96E5-DE2FD420834A.jpeg

8B4ACE16-56B9-48E6-B38E-B3ACBF3788CC.jpeg

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Twostepn, that’s an interesting hammer!  Lol better have a wide hand to start two nails at the same time and good aim!

I found a couple interesting hammers out there. One was tagged as a file makers hammer, it has an interesting bell to it and a different feel to it in your hand. Not balanced at all. 

The second is a small Stanley hammer. Was this for shoe making maybe? The one end looks like you could remove brads with it but the split in to tip is what caught my eye.

8967FF6F-DD0E-489E-AB5D-688A83E2D14B.jpeg

CD560943-73E2-45EA-A73B-783F8A258BDD.jpeg

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There is a small group of grease guns but nothing like what you have Gary. Tom, I thought I might also have a gun for you but it isn’t a Case. Just one that was painted orange, maybe so it wouldn’t be lost easily. 

There are little groups of different things in the Toy House, brass blow torches, gas cans, drill bits, etc.  Dad’s weakness was hand tools. Lots of them. Six walls, a cabinet and 18 groups of wrench’s on boards.  That’s proof of a problem!  ?

EAB303D9-45C6-4B8F-AB34-ED9AC6D99FC5.jpeg

8DB7FDAF-3DDE-491A-8F7E-E2D692EFA747.jpeg

EFDEA6BD-35CC-4273-B189-895567AA6265.jpeg

07419C23-3EC0-482A-ADC4-74BACEE832DC.jpeg

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On 9/7/2018 at 9:28 AM, MT Matt said:

Twostepn, that’s an interesting hammer!  Lol better have a wide hand to start two nails at the same time and good aim!

I found a couple interesting hammers out there. One was tagged as a file makers hammer, it has an interesting bell to it and a different feel to it in your hand. Not balanced at all. 

The second is a small Stanley hammer. Was this for shoe making maybe? The one end looks like you could remove brads with it but the split in to tip is what caught my eye.

8967FF6F-DD0E-489E-AB5D-688A83E2D14B.jpeg

CD560943-73E2-45EA-A73B-783F8A258BDD.jpeg

I will look through some of my books for a file makers hammer.  I've got several blacksmithing books and a couple catalogs from the teens and 20's for reference.  I see a nice "flatter", a fuller hammer and about a 2.5lb cross pein in that first pic also. The bottom one is a tack or brad hammer as you mentioned. 

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Ordinarily I won't contradict Gary's information on early steam engines, but I have to on one of the photos he posted above.   That engine is not a Nichols & Shepard, it is a very early Aultman Taylor "Sunflower"steam engine with the bevel gear drive.  If you notice over the mans shoulder, up near the flywheel, you can see the bevel gear.  

1739674723_EarlywoodenwheelNicholsShepardthreshingebay.thumb.jpg.b71ceb98172fba9176bb432df719019b.jpg.9dd0d052f427a2ccaaeb666a82c1519d.jpg1787738258_rwbgat.jpg.7edf331a27a30566b4e74b0b844ecfe1.jpg

You can also see the wheel design is the same as on the engine shown below which is at the Ford Museum and came from "Steam Engine Joe" Rynda.   Joe had two of these very early self-propelled engines and the other is still owned by the family which I've had the pleasure of seeing several times.

user75662_pic8127_1404161840.jpg.af64d1258091b34fd207c6afd9dcef15.jpg73074559_eSafgPjo.jpg.8f618b94f5d1b6c0869849d68dde7a91.jpguser75662_pic8126_1404161840.jpg.9a1a743a6245173bd851fbdefdcee6a3.jpgaultman-taylor.jpg.b082b566cc85339a5ad0b40f770658de.jpg

 

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2 hours ago, Fred B said:

where that groove is, i thought the face was magnetized  ??   to start tacks  ?

My grandpa used to make a living doing reapholstery. He had similar hammers and a big box of “sterilized tacks”.  He would throw a hand full in his mouth, use one hand to hold the fabric and the other to swing the hammer.  He would manipulate the tacks with his tongue and pick the tacks out his mouth with the magnet.  I always wondered what would happen if he sneezed while doing this

 

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On 9/6/2018 at 12:22 PM, Old Binder Guy said:

That can be a loose statement, Anson, about "when did steam engines first enter use on the farms???" My relative, Philander Standish, built a steam plow in 1867, just two short years after the Civil War. Abe Lincoln imagined such equipment being built, in his lifetime.

163796906_PhilanderStandishssteamplowof1867.thumb.jpg.c008bffdfad41645fcb7abef173e6553.jpg

Case #1, I photographed at the Smithsonian, claimed 1869, but others argue it was in the 1870's. It is a portable, horse pulled engine.  And their traction engines came later.

296747958_Casenumber1SmithsonianbyGY1964-2.thumb.jpg.19831e28f92d95ed2c3382ad7540b395.jpg

A Case horse steered traction engine.

2140470392_1883JICasehorsesteeredsteamtractionengine.jpg.a8bb8ecd35a03e9d6354feb5012e77d1.jpg

Later engines like this Nichols & Shepard with wooden wheels. But nobody knows for sure who was first with the farm engines. I've seen some hot arguments over it. Gary?

1739674723_EarlywoodenwheelNicholsShepardthreshingebay.thumb.jpg.b71ceb98172fba9176bb432df719019b.jpg

That's awesome Gary

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On 9/9/2018 at 9:26 AM, Roger Byrne said:

Ordinarily I won't contradict Gary's information on early steam engines, but I have to on one of the photos he posted above.   That engine is not a Nichols & Shepard, it is a very early Aultman Taylor "Sunflower"steam engine with the bevel gear drive.  If you notice over the mans shoulder, up near the flywheel, you can see the bevel gear.  

1739674723_EarlywoodenwheelNicholsShepardthreshingebay.thumb.jpg.b71ceb98172fba9176bb432df719019b.jpg.9dd0d052f427a2ccaaeb666a82c1519d.jpg1787738258_rwbgat.jpg.7edf331a27a30566b4e74b0b844ecfe1.jpg

You can also see the wheel design is the same as on the engine shown below which is at the Ford Museum and came from "Steam Engine Joe" Rynda.   Joe had two of these very early self-propelled engines and the other is still owned by the family which I've had the pleasure of seeing several times.

user75662_pic8127_1404161840.jpg.af64d1258091b34fd207c6afd9dcef15.jpg73074559_eSafgPjo.jpg.8f618b94f5d1b6c0869849d68dde7a91.jpguser75662_pic8126_1404161840.jpg.9a1a743a6245173bd851fbdefdcee6a3.jpgaultman-taylor.jpg.b082b566cc85339a5ad0b40f770658de.jpg

 

You're right, Roger! I was in a hurry, looking only at the smokestack crown. Gary

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I'm posting quickly and will do much more later. This was 1904 JI Case #14,666 with John Loeffelmacher, leaning on steps, who designed this first 150 hp Case Road Locomotive.1614604609_150hpCase14666cylsideJ.LoeffelmacherRimp.thumb.jpg.250d2cad885a5918787b93d7afa5d176.jpg

This is me and son Mike replicating the photo above, as close as we could get from the close parking of the engines.

563012563_14666GarymeMikewithKorys150hpCase9-8-18.thumb.jpg.2604e847da42e5bebf99ab35ee95f633.jpg

This is Kory Anderson's 150 hp JI Case "restoration" taken on 9-7-18 at Andover, South Dakota.

1920142164_KoryAndersonandColinBeamishon14666150hpCase.thumb.jpg.1cb89d1417f245829264eb1432982330.jpg

1909933764_KoryAndersonfrontviewon14666150hpCase.thumb.jpg.8d17b6dc05286ad4a340a07b248a47c0.jpg

Hitched to the 24-bottom John Deere plow. It pulls it quite effortlessly. It's very impressive on a plow. 

1188872460_1466624-bottomplowwithKorys150hpCasecrop.thumb.jpg.bf759c4eb4c1338c3f70589abf9f61d3.jpg

This is the engine pulling the 24-bottom in this beautiful sandy loam soil. I got video, but can't post it on Red Power. I'll put some of it on Facebook though. I sure met a lot of Facebook friends there. I out foxed my friends there. They were all expecting to be looking for a polka dot cap. I wore the appropriate engineer's cap, as used in the first photo of this post, on John Loeffelmacher and his associate.

506937682_14666pulling24-bottomplowwithKorys150hpCase.thumb.jpg.80af1908edf9a784b226706f29ba79dd.jpg

This is the original bronze Serial Number Plate from the original boiler of JI Case #14,666. This makes it a "restoration," using a part of the original engine, and not a "replica."?

1875395298_14666plaqueonKorys150hpCase.thumb.jpg.4c88b9a4fa225a81670a1281455dea00.jpg

Me trying to reach the top of the  8' driver wheel. They're massive. I'm only 5'-10-1/2" tall though.

979559087_Mereachingthe8driverwheelJackBeamishKory9-7-18.thumb.jpg.f525583ceb1e1f7e536a2ba96863cb8d.jpg

Me on the operator's deck area. They run this engine at the original 160 psi. At least until it gets broken in.

1016423924_14666GarymeonKorys150hpCase9-8-18.thumb.jpg.1c8afe82c4a838e4bcff62585a1788f8.jpg

This is Anderson's 150 hp Case and Anderson's 110 hp Case parked side by side.

1308747616_Andersons150hpand110hpCaseengines9-7-18.thumb.jpg.15ce6b97445e7ef645ae80eabfd4f189.jpg

Roger might understand this? Gary?

988871243_14666GarymeunderKorys150hpCase9-8-18.thumb.jpg.ea14fbed8e4379c20782b5e4dab8cd46.jpg

 

 

 

 

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