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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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Dating on back awhile to 1925.   Sorry about picture quality----------had to snap a picture of the screen in order to save.

 

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Found this listing of old dealers on the IH dealers of the past site----------------thanks to a poster on another thread asking about an old dealer in Illinois.  First time I have ever been able to pull up Greenville, Mississippi.

Listing shows my dad as local dealer for 1925-----1926.   He sold the dealership to Home Hardware/Delta Implement Co---------and then went to work direct with Harvester promoting the Farmalls across the southeast.

The late Harold H's (here on RedPower) dad was associated with Delta Implement Co.

 

Below---------picture of my dad and uncle cross-plowing cotton with Farmall Regulars (circa 1925).   This picture was used in Harvester's advertising promoting the "mighty" Regular.   (I have posted this picture before---------that's my dad on the left)

 

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Note the early model seat mount to the differential housing---------and vertical exhaust and air intake (flannel cloth aircleaners).

 

 

Delta Dirt   Avon  Ms   38723

 

 

 

 

 

 

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OK fellas, I just got off the phone with Mike and Gary is doing good.     OBG is out of the hospital (I think it was by request of the nurses ?) and will be back in Montana before the end of the week.  I'm guessing he'll be commenting on our behavior while he was gone . . . so you better watch it Anson!!

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1 hour ago, Roger Byrne said:

OK fellas, I just got off the phone with Mike and Gary is doing good.     OBG is out of the hospital (I think it was by request of the nurses ?) and will be back in Montana before the end of the week.  I'm guessing he'll be commenting on our behavior while he was gone . . . so you better watch it Anson!!

Thats good to hear Roger. 

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Fred-----

Our land is flat-------with 52----53" annual rainfall, DRAINAGE has always been the #1 concern, so cotton and now corn are most always planted on raised bed (row).

Planters are mounted-------in early days the sword opener was most popular.  Nowadays------disc opener.

On dry land beans-------you will see some planted flaf with mounted grain drills.

Big advantage of raised bed is drainage for the seedling crop------can scuff off top and find moisture-------tends to warm up earlier in spring-------and provides furrow for down the row irrigation.  Most everything now is planted on stale (undisturbed) beds.

Now all that said---------just to tell you the truth Fred, I wasn't here in the 1920's!!!!!   I wasn't manufactured until 1943.?

But most of the mule farming was on raised beds also.

*******

I saw some corn being harvested here today------most likely high moisture going into bins for dry down.  Crops are maturing fast up here.

How is harvest down your way??

 

DD

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Anson, we have a 30" annual rainfall. 

Our land is flat also. Prior to 30 years ago, all crops were planted on beds w/blackland type planters w/sweep to plow off top of bed, then opening shovel and closing shovels. 

Today, very few beds.  Apparently, beds are too much work and you can't use wide equipment.  I farm flat, but I still think bedded is better.  It's just a little harder keeping the beds correct. 

My son now farms with me and we farm flat using GPS, (no row markers).  and kinze planter.  Sorghum crop was mediocre, Cotton is maybe 2-1/2 bales per acre. 

We started harvesting cotton July 30 this year, the earliest we've ever started.  We try to have it out by the middle of August when we usually get some rain almost like clockwork.  This year it came early.

This past Sunday we got rained out (4 in) on one of our best fields.  (not good)  Weather people say we are about 3 in ahead for the year, however, we didn't get rain back when the crop needed it.  With beds most everyone plowed out the stalks with middle busters.  Then following a rain and volunteer plants came up we would rebed (split beds) maybe late September. 

There are some old timers that had an exact date that was the deadline for rebedding.  If not done by that date, you would save the bed and plant there the next year, which would be 1/2 row off of where the plants were last year.  You would run middles as needed until planting late feb-early march.

Sometimes Dad would put a 4 row cultivator on the front of the M and a 4 row planter on the back and clean the field of young weeds and plant at the same time.  

Right now we are waiting for it to dry up and try to get back into the field.  

Fred

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Past practices were immediately prior to planting to drag off top of row with harrow-----then later years the "do-all" (rolling chopper blades with harrow on rear) came into effect--------now most everybody uses burn down chemical and plants on a stale seedbed.

Preference is to row up in fall-------let bed settle from winter rains-----burn off and plant in the undisturbed soil.  Planting earlier and harvesting earlier nowadays.

Cotton is still green and blooming------but I saw some early corn being cut yesterday.  Harvest activity will be picking up next week on corn and early soybeans.

Most everything is 12 row and GPS over here now.  I last farmed in 1985------my farming days are totally obsolete now.

 

DD

 

 

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Well I think OBG may be back at home and checking his forum.  Seeing that this page starts out with a bunch of the other "Green",  I figured maybe some IHC tractors that were green would help balance out the page.   The first one is a 10-20 Mogul and the last three are 8-16 Moguls.

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I know where the two middle pictures were taken; Lewistown, MT. It was restored bGary's and my good friend Chuck Bronec of Geraldine, MT.  Chuck also restored a 10-20 Case for the club.

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Attention Roger-----

Bitty posted these pictures under the thread "Mystery Machine" here on the Coffee Shop forum.

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Several (including TubaCase) replied that it was a vertical steam engine (with no boiler).

Fill us in on how this engine functioned----where does it get it's steam pressure from.  Would the boiler maybe been located elsewhere??  Sorta puzzles me------looks to be a rare item???

AND------do you know by chance how many of these Gary has laying around Mike's shop floor????

 

DD

 

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Anson, I really am not a steam man but I would think the boiler would be located separate of the engine.  The steam would be piped from the boiler to the union looking part where it says GARDNER QUINCY LL.  That's a throttle valve controlled by the fly ball governor that is belt driven from the pulley below?  The little shaft in the center of the gears would be made to go up or down to open/close the throttle valve?  We've had a lesson sometime earlier on how the engine itself works.  The little town of Violet 

Texas where I was baptized and still go to church there has a grain elevator/cotton gin (electric) that used to be    (way before my time), steam powered.  The only thing left is the large governor wired up on the wall of the engine room.  It's about 4ft tall.(elevator and gin still in bisiness)  I'll stand corrected if someone else has another idea.  

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52 minutes ago, Fred B said:

Anson, I really am not a steam man but I would think the boiler would be located separate of the engine.  The steam would be piped from the boiler to the union looking part where it says GARDNER QUINCY LL.  That's a throttle valve controlled by the fly ball governor that is belt driven from the pulley below?  The little shaft in the center of the gears would be made to go up or down to open/close the throttle valve?  We've had a lesson sometime earlier on how the engine itself works.  The little town of Violet 

Texas where I was baptized and still go to church there has a grain elevator/cotton gin (electric) that used to be    (way before my time), steam powered.  The only thing left is the large governor wired up on the wall of the engine room.  It's about 4ft tall.  I'll stand corrected if someone else has another idea.  

I agree with the steam supply being non attached . I am guessing that was to make it easier to get the power in a small area like this. It's in a small building they called the milk house. There was a bottle cleaner in there. Years ago they hauled milk to the Ralston area (1940s and before I believe) I wish I could link to the article uncle George wrote that my wife posted on the forum for me to share after he passed. 

It was titled 

George Washington Ridge

February 26, 2015

I have not figured out how to link up yet

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Holy Cow! I figured I'd have to empty the dustbin to find this thread! I can't type worth a hoot and I don't know if I will ever be able to play the squeezebox again. I got chopped up good. Rather than have to type this all twice, I went to Facebook and copied and pasted the below.

"God is in control" has been my statement from the beginning. I have not been given more than I could handle, thank the Lord.

Hello again friends. I'm home. I deeply appreciate all of your prayers and thought for me in the past four weeks. You are all real gems! God bless you.

I've had fevers and infections here at home from the four times I was catheterized. I'm not running any races, whatsoever!

I HAD polymorphous adenocarcinoma in the tumor excised from my palate. Because it went through my skull or palate bone into my sinus, it was rated stage 4. I lost some teeth where the jawbone was effected. The Dr. Claims his team got it all in this 12 hour surgery. I was under sedation for 30 hours. I got out of the hospital on my 11th day. Praise God, my lymph nodes are clear!

My pain today is the result of the needed repairs to my palate. A new palate needed to be built. They excised a Flap or patch of deep flesh behind my left wrist, about the size of a large bar of soap. They slit from there to my elbow, removing the blood vessel with the patch or "flap." After stapling up the empty slit, they sutured that flap into my mouth on my palate. There has to be 200 stitches?? They then removed a layer of flesh from my left thigh and sutured it into the hole on my wrist. They then cut my throat from my left ear to just above my Adam's apple. They used that entry to hook up that blood vessel. Every morning they punctured the flap to make sure it was getting blood. (Otherwise a "do-over.")

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I'll be back here probably next week sometime. I have over 500 emails to sort through(mostly trash to sort through). I'm like a mosquito in a nudist colony. I know what to do, but don't know where to start. God bless each and every one of you who prayed for me! Gary

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Glad to see your post Professor.

And-------glad to see the old blacksmith/steam engineer has learned some new medical terminology that most of us have no idea what you are talking about (polymorphous adenocarcinoma).

And------damm sure can't spell it.?

Looks like the doctor cut and gnawed on you pretty good.

Hang in there-------just keep on coming forward.

Anson  aka:

Delta Dirt  Avon Ms   38723

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On 8/5/2018 at 5:11 PM, Delta Dirt said:

Note the early model seat

And I also noticed something from my earliest days of looking at tractors, those diagonal lugs on the rear wheels of those two (what're they, Regulars or F-20s?) tractors.

best, randy

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9 minutes ago, Delta Dirt said:

Farmall Regulars

Ah-so, well, I'd pretty much thought so, thanks for the answer!  Our neighbor on the farm had one and I can remember looking at the oval side exhaust and grey paint compared to the our F-20.

That was all a l-o-n-g time before I left to enlist into the USAF and found chums down at Rolling Fork and Anguilla and the gin and such in the CAF.

 

best, randy

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Good to see you back Binder Guy!  Sounds like there is plenty of healing up left to do but sounds like your doing pretty well so far all things considered. Keep up the good work! 

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Thanks for all of the well wishes, fella's. I just ran onto a picture from Seattle. I lost some teeth and with that new, sewn in palate, was quite limited to my eating ability. I took this selfie after out of the University of Washington Medical Center. I was eating Jello, pudding, yogurt etc. Our daughter, knowing my likes and dislikes, thought about Spam! One of my lifelong favorites. Cut in little chunks it is perfect! Also notice the shirt with the 8-16 IHC gas tractor on it. That is the shirt I wore to the hospital, the morning of my operation. I didn't want to disappoint fans here.  Gary?

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So glad to hear from you Gary. Must have work left to do around there somewhere because the "Big Man" upstairs obviously isn't ready for you yet. Class is back in session!!!  We tried to keep DD in check while you were gone...?

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