Jump to content

IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

Recommended Posts

Brews4me, That is a neat little IH Crawler your family had for logging. I agree, a grille guard would have been nice to save that original grille. I'd say it is a T-6 as well.

Anson, your bells are so much nicer than the bells I have. I think I'll start up the TD-40 and run over my bells. That big bell is something else! Your daughter and granddaughter are cutie pies, too!

This is the McCormick Deering TD-40 TracTracTor I'd be running over my bells with, Anson. Only because it's an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm. It used to be a logging crawler as well, years and years ago.

5951e3814267a_TD-40TracTracTorinparkingspot11-2-16red.thumb.jpg.09f2b6328709c3010b5cf9adc39380d0.jpg

Sledgehammer, I looked and I had several used valves for your whistle. It isn't a steam valve. It has a teflon disk, I believe? It says "WOG" on it which means "water, oil, gas" and no steam was mentioned. If you're going to use it with compressed air, you'll be just fine. If you can message me with your real name and address, I'll send it to you.

5951e13fa93d6_WhistletypevalveSledgehammerTodd6-26-17red.thumb.jpg.fccbf545c3de2ee6110a9a08073eee9d.jpg

I also posted the photo of two of the whistles on the Case steam engine. The 4 inch, three chime whistle closest has one of my homemade levers. I have the original lever, but it is about it is just over half as long. This long strap iron lever allows "feathering" the whistle under high pressure. Gary;)

5951e18bb0b04_15hpCasewhistles6-12-17red.thumb.jpg.845c7c01ef4bd5d3585e42235dc3f5a2.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Professor- - - - - - as a true friend and just to save you the trouble of handcranking the old TD 40;  you can ship your bells to Box 90, Avon Ms,  38723!!!!:)

The big bell needs repainting- - - - - - - and the little grand daughter is now taller than I am and getting ready to be a junior in college.  Time keeps marching on.

At the rate Hammer is collecting up old plunder- - - - - we may have to issue him an official "old codger" certificate.  That boy has the taste of an old man!!:ph34r:

 

DD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

At the rate Hammer is collecting up old plunder- - - - - we may have to issue him an official "old codger" certificate.  That boy has the taste of an old man!!:ph34r:

      I take that as a compliment for sure.  Since I was a little kid I have liked older things more than new.  Something strikes me about the way things were made either by hand or by process that can no longer be realized because of cost in today's world.  I get that taste from my Mother.  She has always had an eye for the finer things from our past.  I gravitate towards things I can use or have fun with (like the whistle)  Most people my age (33) wouldn't know what it was, let alone, try to use it.   There is no way that whistle won't bring a smile to the face of young and old kids alike.  

      The cotton is growing rapidly.  It really took ahold of the nitrogen I added.  I add a little water to them now and then of an evening.  We received around 2" of rain from the remnants of the tropical storm moving North last weekend so it should be good for a while.  79A9BF8E-3057-4FCB-B07F-98C3F1B2518D_zps

The pic is a little bit poor with the shadows.  It was taken Sunday night. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cotton is looking good- - - - should have fruit forming in the terminals (small Pin head size squares, that grow into squares that will eventually bloom and form a boll).

*******

Keep on collecting "old plunder"- - - - and "young children".  Both are good items to have in stock.

Hammer, Jr. Is gonna like that whistle.

 

DD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/27/2017 at 8:03 AM, Delta Dirt said:

Cotton is looking good- - - - should have fruit forming in the terminals (small Pin head size squares, that grow into squares that will eventually bloom and form a boll).

*******

Keep on collecting "old plunder"- - - - and "young children".  Both are good items to have in stock.

Hammer, Jr. Is gonna like that whistle.

 

DD

I think Jr is going to like the whistle also.  I need to figure out about how much pressure gives it a good tone.  I tested it with a rag wrapped around the base and a blow gun so with actual threaded pipe and fewer leaks something that size should make some noise on 100psi or so I would think?  Otherwise I have a 17lb CO2 tank that I use to air up tires away from the shop.  It has a regulator and could be turned up to a much higher pressure.  If the air compressor will give it enough pressure I will probably mount it similar to Gary's pics above so it can be blown from a stationary position on the wall in the shop.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a real good discussion on whistles with Roger several years ago.

Roger said that volume plays a more important role than pressure-------seems like 50---60 psi was adequate for most larger whistles; but you need a high volume.  Most likely need a large accumulator tank with larger size piping to valve-----with a pressure regulator so to find the "sweet spot".

Keep us posted on your progress.

 

DD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I will be sure and keep everyone up to date on progress as I comes. I've been running wild lately since we are about to get very busy pollinating and taking in-field traits on stuff at work 6-7days a week.  I took off this afternoon and went to Louisville KY to get blacksmithing coal for myself and 2 others. This originated in West Virginia. It is super pure "metallurgic bituminous" coal that is clean and produces several more BTUs (+1000BTU) compared to regular KY or IL coal. I used two (free) chemical totes cleaned throughly and scavenged plywood (free) from someone's leftover pile to make two coal bins that would close and strap down on my trailer.  I will confess that I purchased new hinges because I didn't want to use up any of my vintage ones on this project. Anyone want to guess the weight?  

210 gallon tote x 2, filled evenly full settled that much on the road home.  Here's a hint.....the internet will lead you astray on the weight of coal....  What? Everything you read on the internet isn't true?  Not in this case.  Answer will come later :)

8F75E60B-4AD8-4198-9FB5-2FE10AF9EE71_zps

I see some use wood and some use coal for steam traction engines. Is that due to fuel availability in the area or is there another reason for that?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

I will be sure and keep everyone up to date on progress as I comes. I've been running wild lately since we are about to get very busy pollinating and taking in-field traits on stuff at work 6-7days a week.  I took off this afternoon and went to Louisville KY to get blacksmithing coal for myself and 2 others. This originated in West Virginia. It is super pure "metallurgic bituminous" coal that is clean and produces several more BTUs (+1000BTU) compared to regular KY or IL coal. I used two (free) chemical totes cleaned throughly and scavenged plywood (free) from someone's leftover pile to make two coal bins that would close and strap down on my trailer.  I will confess that I purchased new hinges because I didn't want to use up any of my vintage ones on this project. Anyone want to guess the weight?  

210 gallon tote x 2, filled evenly full settled that much on the road home.  Here's a hint.....the internet will lead you astray on the weight of coal....  What? Everything you read on the internet isn't true?  Not in this case.  Answer will come later :)

8F75E60B-4AD8-4198-9FB5-2FE10AF9EE71_zps

I see some use wood and some use coal for steam traction engines. Is that due to fuel availability in the area or is there another reason for that?

That's due to fuel availability mostly, Todd. Some engines in coal country will burn wood if turning a sawmill with the engine. We use wood because of availability and wish we had coal. And....... Blacksmith coal.... It's hard to come by in Montana. Now, I'M Envious!! There's lots of coal in the state. But we're several hundred miles from it. 

And whistles, Mike has a 175psi air compressor with a huge tank. We ran 3/4" pipe to the whistles and they are loud enough I generally wear hearing protection when blowing them. The first time it tried to blow that big photo of Roger's off of the wall above them.

5955dde5019f6_ShopWhistlesonairlineatSC5-9-13red.thumb.jpg.2a14a737dc7272002216e4341e3d5cb3.jpg

Ahe here are the ear protection muffs in this photo. Plus, there's that little tiny whistle with a half or 5/8" inch diameter bell. I took one of those small valves and made a broken pair of pliers into the "lever." It works slick! Gary;)

5955ddefa86f4_Teenytinylittlewhistleshopsteamwall1-9-17red.thumb.jpg.b64104b18600d516a2dc98d39dde8a51.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

re:  whistles/whustles-----and high volumes of air

Do any of ya'll remember the whistle that some of the old timers would blow off of the exhaust on a car or pick up.

Seems like it was called a "Wildcat Whistle"???  I remember a neighbor having one back in the early '50's-----operated through an exhaust "cut-out valve placed in front of the muffler.  Sorta got a combination growl from the open exhaust------and shrill from the whistle.  (tone from whistle was never that impressive------but did make lots of noise)

Don't really remember if the whistle was home made or  if you could maybe buy the whistle from J.C. Whitney???  Never had a "Wildcat Whistle-----but did buy an exhaust cut-out from J.C. Whitney when in high school.

Now wondering if J.C. Whitney is still in business-------wasn't much in the automotive "novelty world" that they didn't have listed in their paper catalogs.  (seems like they were in Chicago??)

Hadn't thought about the exhaust cut out or J.C. Whitney in long time.

******

Unique design on the "broken pliers" lever for for the whistle Professor!!!

 

DD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Delta Dirt said:

re:  whistles/whustles-----and high volumes of air

Do any of ya'll remember the whistle that some of the old timers would blow off of the exhaust on a car or pick up.

Seems like it was called a "Wildcat Whistle"???  I remember a neighbor having one back in the early '50's-----operated through an exhaust "cut-out valve placed in front of the muffler.  Sorta got a combination growl from the open exhaust------and shrill from the whistle.  (tone from whistle was never that impressive------but did make lots of noise)

Don't really remember if the whistle was home made or  if you could maybe buy the whistle from J.C. Whitney???  Never had a "Wildcat Whistle-----but did buy an exhaust cut-out from J.C. Whitney when in high school.

Now wondering if J.C. Whitney is still in business-------wasn't much in the automotive "novelty world" that they didn't have listed in their paper catalogs.  (seems like they were in Chicago??)

Hadn't thought about the exhaust cut out or J.C. Whitney in long time.

******

Unique design on the "broken pliers" lever for for the whistle Professor!!!

 

DD

 Anson, J C Whitney is still in business, or at least as of last year. My son is working on  restoring a '69 F-100 pickup and he sent off for a Whitney catalog just to see what they had. Funny thing...he had to get online to order the paper catalog.

   All this talk of air and exhaust to power the whistles reminds me of a question I asked right here a couple years ago. There is a difference in the tone or "sound" if a whistle is powered by steam or air? And I guess also exhaust power? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anson, The JC Whitney company is still alive and well in Chicago. It started out as Warshawsky in 1915. I used to order from Warshawsky. I remember getting "Lakes plugs" or whatever you called those side pipes, under the rocker panels, for my 1956 Mercury Montclair Phaeton. They were pipes that were welded into the sides of your "dual pipes," which you could get out your 1/2" wrench, loosen the two bolts, flip the caps up, tighten the nuts and you were ready to "straight pipe race." No more muffler back pressure! I can't remember what else I ordered from Warshawsky. This is literature for the 1956 Mercury Montclair four door hardtop Phaeton like I had my Lakes plugs (Laker pipes?) on. Only our literature I could read and not guess what is said!

5957c4c24823e_1956MercuryPhaetonMontclairefourdoorhardtopliteraturead.jpg.99f7b31d244bdbe7a574a57609567ad3.jpg

Anson and Todd, This is an old Aermore exhaust whistle. They weren't terribly loud, like a steam whistle. Dad and his brothers had one on their Rumely combine to signal the truck that the grain tank was full. They later abandoned it for lack of "loudness." I rode lots of miles (acres?) as a small boy "baby sat" in the grain tank of this combine.

5957c2f64b6a1_Aermoreexhaustwhistleebay.JPG.b3b1a3d8081ddb7a7c4d67f2efbf3090.JPG

Most of the car whistles were much smaller than the Aermore. I don't have any photos of them. But another thing from the old days was the "spark plug" whistle. They Tee'd off of one cylinder's spark plug and whistled too. Dad and his brothers used to have a "bull rake" with one of these whistles. They were pretty effective. I always wondered how effective the spark plug was on that cylinder though, since it moved the spark plug a couple inches away from it's hole in the cylinder head.

5957c324cd3d0_ModelTsparkplugwhistle.jpg.137d60435662ca6270cb6008c5f9672a.jpg

The Rumely combine with the Eremore Air Horn is being pulled by Dad's IH TD-9. It was an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm! Gary;)

5957c5b787a30_TD-9RumelyK-5sharpred.thumb.jpg.3370941a6ad1bead976867403d437c25.jpg

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

42 minutes ago, Old Binder Guy said:

Anson, The JC Whitney company is still alive and well in Chicago. It started out as Warshawsky in 1915. I used to order from Warshawsky. I remember getting "Lakes plugs" or whatever you called those side pipes, under the rocker panels, for my 1956 Mercury Montclair Phaeton. They were pipes that were welded into the sides of your "dual pipes," which you could get out your 1/2" wrench, loosen the two bolts, flip the caps up, tighten the nuts and you were ready to "straight pipe race." No more muffler back pressure! I can't remember what else I ordered from Warshawsky. This is literature for the 1956 Mercury Montclair four door hardtop Phaeton like I had my Lakes plugs (Laker pipes?) on. Only our literature I could read and not guess what is said!

5957c4c24823e_1956MercuryPhaetonMontclairefourdoorhardtopliteraturead.jpg.99f7b31d244bdbe7a574a57609567ad3.jpg

Anson and Todd, This is an old Aermore exhaust whistle. They weren't terribly loud, like a steam whistle. Dad and his brothers had one on their Rumely combine to signal the truck that the grain tank was full. They later abandoned it for lack of "loudness." I rode lots of miles (acres?) as a small boy "baby sat" in the grain tank of this combine.

5957c2f64b6a1_Aermoreexhaustwhistleebay.JPG.b3b1a3d8081ddb7a7c4d67f2efbf3090.JPG

Most of the car whistles were much smaller than the Aermore. I don't have any photos of them. But another thing from the old days was the "spark plug" whistle. They Tee'd off of one cylinder's spark plug and whistled too. Dad and his brothers used to have a "bull rake" with one of these whistles. They were pretty effective. I always wondered how effective the spark plug was on that cylinder though, since it moved the spark plug a couple inches away from it's hole in the cylinder head.

5957c324cd3d0_ModelTsparkplugwhistle.jpg.137d60435662ca6270cb6008c5f9672a.jpg

The Rumely combine with the Eremore Air Horn is being pulled by Dad's IH TD-9. It was an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm! Gary;)

5957c5b787a30_TD-9RumelyK-5sharpred.thumb.jpg.3370941a6ad1bead976867403d437c25.jpg

 

Hi Gary, nice photos from the good old days, I wish I lived back then

I found two old movies (short films really) that have Rumely Combines in them but they weren't filmed in Montana:

 

 

-Urs

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's Funny you guys mention JC Whitney. I purchased an Oooooga Horn from them when I was in high school. It went under the hood of my truck and was very loud. It always made people smile when I reached under the dash and hit the hidden switch. That horn later made it onto at least 1 Jeep. It is still stored away ready for use of needed in the future. Jr may want something like that in about 16 years, just never know.....

My other noise maker for the shop is a set of air horns from a semi tractor ($5 at a sale).  A 3" long pipe joint and a spring loaded air gun handle made this toy a lot of fun. 

0AE5CE92-0C5F-4990-9075-1EB5605C1DBF_zps

I have heard tell of exhaust whistles in the past but never seen one in person. That would be a good signal to unload.  Today, I see many farmers turn on the safety strobe lights on the roof of their combines to signal a grain cart or truck of a full hopper. The whistle has a lot more character in my opinion ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I remember correctly, they were called "wolf whistles", and the ad always showed a cute girl looking at the 'greaser' and his car.....

Seems like I heard that Warshawsky was the 'wholesale' part of Whitney---- the addresses were just around the corner from each other.

I also remember that warshawsky had 'used' parts for sale in their catalog.

I also heard that warshawsky was pretty much a "MIDNIGHT AUTO" operation. Can't prove that tho...

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Having been there once, the two addresses opened into the same showroom with a junk yard out back.  However, around 1990, the company went bankrupt with JC Whitney coming out of it primarily as a mail order company.  They now have a rather impressive building on I-80 west of Chicago at LaSalle, IL, no more store in Chicago or junkyard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Urs, that first Rumely was a very small model. I never saw any like that before. Dad and his brothers had two of the larger types as were pulled by the horses. Ours were originally 16 foot headers, but they ordered two four foot extensions for the headers and the aprons, both cutting 20 feet. They later put them on rubber tires. They both got new John Deere (Hercules) combine engines. They got McCormick combine elevators after they wore out the originals. I wanted to be the "header man" when I grew up. They stopped using the Rumelys about 1953, so I never got to do that. Us kids rode in the grain tank where it was safe, standing on the cross bracing. They wouldn't let us ride out with the header man, in case we'd fall off. Maybe even into the header? The four foot extension is visible outboard, on the photo below.

595861ae0a07a_YaegersRumelycombineharvester.thumb.jpg.ca02c5bcecdd6262036518e96316da7e.jpg

This was my dad peering into the cylinder area of one of the Rumely combine harvesters. (That's what's printed on the owner's manual "Rumely Combine Harvester") I don't know what the problem was, as this was way before my time. That McCormick tractor is technically an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm

595861c3ef3e3_JoeYaegerontheRumelyCombineHarvesterMCCormickDeeringtractor.thumb.jpg.2180c1c60b9cb5a572b840a39e625dbe.jpg

mikem, this is an "Original Hollywood Wolf Whistle" for automobiles, I've heard lots of Model A Ford's with these as well. They had a cable attached to the "whistle lever" at left. With a little wrist action, and that cable, you could make them sound like a darn good, loud whistle, like you'd do with your mouth, teeth and little fingers. They sure made the ladies turn their heads, thinking they were the brunt of that "sexy" whistle. This was more of a high pitch horn than a "whistle" I think? And, I knew very little about Warshawsky and Whitney. Montana is so far removed from Chicago, "you can't get here from there."

 

5958630a937d6_Hollywoodwolfwhistleforcar.jpg.7bf271f1e478579990effc7b25d3c0c2.jpg

And thanks for an accurate update on the "Warshawsky/JC Whitney situation Howard_P!  Gary;)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wolf Whistle illustration

I see on the bottom of the box----it says "an intake whistle".  So-----was this a vacuum operated operated whistle??

********

Reckon if you set an exhaust whistle up on a Detroit Diesel-------instead of a "Wildcat Whistle";------ it would sound more like a "GRIZZLY Bear" whistle!!!!  (the ultimate growling/roaring sound):ph34r::ph34r::o:o

The "Wildcat Whistle" may have been home made by my neighbor (he was near 20 yrs older than me----and somewhat of a wildcat and a "wolph"-----in addition to being a mechanical genius).

DD

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anson, I hadn't noticed that Intake Whistle line... You're getting sharp in your young age. 

I thought of you when I took this photo this afternoon. It's a little "peanut" whistle Carl Mehmke gave me years ago.

5959a1106ac89_CarlMehmkewhistleon20hpReevesdeck7-2-17.thumb.jpg.7c032e45926fa119aaa36e52b997d504.jpg

I also took this, this afternoon. Mike and I had their 20 hp Reeves fired up, so I had to take this selfie.

5959a0fe246cc_20hpReevesmeandMikeselfiered7-2-17.thumb.jpg.568c97eaa47ff581fa788585b7698187.jpg

Making some smoke while belted to the fan. Gary;)

 

20 hp Reeves belted to fan, smokestack smoking, 7-2-17.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looks like a first class afternoon!

 

I didn't have time to project much this afternoon. I did find a tap to chase the inlet threads on the whistle. 3/4 - 14 NPT which was actually my guess before I started. I was able to thread a piece of pipe into it nicely when I finished. The threads were in rough shape when I started so I was worried I might have to drill it out and start over a size larger. There is plenty of material to do that but I did not want to alter it if possible. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sledgehammer, I'm glad you were able to clean up the threads on your whistle. I should have mentioned yours was 3/4" NPT.

A couple more photos of the 1909 20 hp Reeves steamed up today at Silver Creek. This one is of Mike and the engine belted to his fan.

5959ac1f1442d_20hpReevesbeltedtofanMikeatthrottle7-2-17.thumb.jpg.3a289bcdc00f4d34790c4d82e6b7d64a.jpg

This one was of it backed up to the woodpile. There's a pretty good view of those whistles, Anson. Gary;)

 

20 hp Reeves backed to wood pile 7-2-17.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, Old Binder Guy said:

A couple more photos of the 1909 20 hp Reeves steamed up today at Silver Creek. This one is of Mike and the engine belted to his fan.

5959ac1f1442d_20hpReevesbeltedtofanMikeatthrottle7-2-17.thumb.jpg.3a289bcdc00f4d34790c4d82e6b7d64a.jpg

Another couple sticks in the fire and pointing that thing SE and Anson and I might have felt the breeze :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

re:  red tractor and rusty side delivery rake

Sure makes for a scenic picture with that backdrop.

I've got a rake like that------except that my front wheels are severely warped (bent).  Wheels were damaged by a guy that I was letting store round bales of hay getting rambuncious with his front loader in pushing some old hay around.

Anybody know what model IH rake that is??  (mine is IH or IHC)

 

DD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

55 minutes ago, Delta Dirt said:

Anybody know what model IH rake that is??  

Anson, 

The rake pictured looks like this one in CH Wendel's book.  Hard to say for sure but this is close.

AF331EB8-74BC-4556-95EA-3BB797046398_zps

99A833CF-0696-495E-9651-9BFAAACD22BC_zps

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have a good 4th ya'll!!!

*******

Hammer---

Will have to study my old rake------sure looks to be a similar design to what you have pictured.  But mine has small, solid steering (pivot) wheels with a tie rod connecting them up top (as illustrated in the original red tractor picture).

 Probably a later model than the $85 model you have pictured???

Will have to swipe your pictures to my picture files-----thanks.

******

Not sure about the watermelon crop Professor.  Here it is July 4th------and I don't believe I 'm gonna find a ripe w-melon.  I did pull some sweet corn yesterday------along with several cantaloupes.  Cantaloupes smell good------but have little flavor.  Lots of melons rotting on vine (fungus)------just toooo much rain; not enough sunshine.

Hard to have it just right------but, the rain sure has been good to the corn, cotton and soybeans down this way.

 

DD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...