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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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1 hour ago, Delta Dirt said:

quote from yesterday's post:  

"Times have changed-----------the fall maturing crops come off at least a month earlier than back in the 70--80's.  Sure makes a difference--------unless we have the remnants of a hurricane blow through in late August or September."

 

It's not fall---------but we have a tropical storm on the gulf coast right now pushing what looks to be heavy rains our way.   Sorta unusual to see tropical storms this early in the season.

 

******************************

Best I can tell-----------my grampa's old Hampden pocket watch is keeping excellent time.   It has not lost a second in the past serveral months---------------------all hands are sitting in exactly the same place as I left them back in the winter when we had the "great pocket watch" discussion going here!!!!:rolleyes::lol:

That watch fob is impressive Professor.

 

**********

Thanks to Mike and Randy for sending the cool breeze out of the northwest down this way---------we were wondering where it came from.

 

DD

 

Male bovine excrement, Anson? There were no cows present. Only bulls.

I always like photos taken over the crankshaft. They show the "whustles" too, Anson.

594a8d9cc5851_15hpCasefromdeckovercrankshaftflywheelphotofan6-18-17red.thumb.jpg.7c70b8948047b86ff1606d458e1d214b.jpg

And this bib overall selfie... My dad's watch in the place he used to carry his. Only he wore blue coveralls.

594a8e0946b60_Hamiltonwatchfobinbiboveralls6-18-17red.thumb.jpg.427a0245c6f2935efd3d1434950fbfd0.jpg

Monday morning, I had a friend from Marengo, Iowa here in Helena to have a couple hours of visiting, before they went on to Kalispell and Glacier National Park. I met Bob Jacoby the same day I met Roger, at Osage, Iowa in August of 2007. Bob's dad used to operate a 16 hp Reeves Highwheeler steam engine. Of course my dad operated a 20 hp Reeves Highwheeler. Kind of a common bond, I guess? His "friend" took this photo of us with Mike and Randy's 20 hp Reeves (low wheeler?).

594a8e75c596a_GarymeYaegerBobJacobyofIowawith20hpReevesatSilverCreek6-19-17.jpg.a622b23be0afb6d4779a626122ef8b62.jpg

And Bob couldn't discriminate, so we had her take this picture of us with the 15 hp Case as well. Gary

 

 

 

 

Bob Jacoby & Gary me Yaeger with 15 hp Case 6-19-17.jpg

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quote:

"male bovine excrement"

Looks like I am gonna have to get my hip boots out- - - - - - that's a real similar product to Blue Smoke isn't it???

HELLLLP  Roger- - - - - - -your friend the Professor is running out of control!!!!

********

I am thinking the M- F 750 picture was taken in 1980 also.  Think the 750 picture was a 1977 model (it did have the heavy duty 4 speed transmission with hydrostat drive)

Those Masseys weren't Aultman- Taylors- - - - - - - - but we didn't leave much grain on the ground!!!!

I actually had a shallow steel pan that I would toss under the combine- - - - and check for grain loss out of the rear.  Didn't do any good to spend all season growing it- - - - - - and put it on the ground in the harvest process.  Tried to make every bushel count.

(And- - - - - - - I still got poor enough to retire from farming!!!!):blink::huh:

 

DD

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Anson, my 760 had the hydrostatic drive with the transmission too. It also had the Perkins V-8 diesel, but I no longer remember the cubic inches. That was a few years ago. Speaking of "Aultman & Taylor," I took another photo of the old tin sign I took off of Grandpa Yaeger's A&T threshing machine back in the1950's as it was underway, rotting down into a pile. Mike has it on one of his shop roll up doors.

594d645c05928_TinsignAultmanTaylorchicken6-12-17red.thumb.jpg.7d486fec83519079b1d84667c2b90cfd.jpg

I'll never forget the 4568 had an 800 cubic inch V-8 though. But, what the heck.... It was an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm.

594d64c606814_IH456855chisel1971plowGMC-2.jpg.ef6f7571685cc720523965e7c03cac4e.jpg

Here's a new one for me! An IH 55W ELECTRIC hay baler. I'd never heard of them before.:o

594d6469a5405_IH55WelectrichaybalerEdTut.jpg.c185cf31e6055c5c68809843af9c8473.jpg

This shows the large electric motor that drove it. Gary;)

594d6471c17f5_IH55WelectrichaybalerEdTut.jpg.1e64a68c354874f31a8d2898c8fe15ce.jpg

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Bet that electric baler used a heck of a long extension cord!!!    lol

Somewhere in all the post about the recent RPRU someone had a pic of a electric baler hooked to I think a IH 400 with the Electrall attachment.

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6 hours ago, twostepn2001 said:

Bet that electric baler used a heck of a long extension cord!!!    lol

Somewhere in all the post about the recent RPRU someone had a pic of a electric baler hooked to I think a IH 400 with the Electrall attachment.

It was an MTA and I took these two

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2 hours ago, TN Hillbilly said:

Someone with experience, please please please explain how well (or poorly) these worked.  Seems so....weird.

It would solve the lack of live pto and eliminate the dangers of the pto shaft running along the drawbar and a lot less moving parts. Wonder when it will come back and be the latest greatest thing. Just think...plug in the combine at the end of the day!

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How much voltage- - - amps would the Electrall put out on a M or Super M??

Nevèr have seen one.

Presuming they run off of the belt pulley drive- - - - wouldn't it still be subject to the main clutch being engaged for power???  (not live)

 

DD

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Ok this is the place to be for steam knowledge so I picked up something today that you fine purveyors of antique information will Hopefully know about. I think it is a whistle without a trigger mechanism? Barrel is 3" diameter and 6" long. The inlet threads are in poor shape but the price was very good. It came from an estate sale. E4F18E7E-4CE9-448F-B02E-638EA9491B6E_zps

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Here is another from the same sale. This was a concrete CASE eagle and today it was worth $750. The guy that purchased it supposedly has 3 cast iron eagles also. 916C03CF-864A-43C1-86C0-1C19E1C514AA_zps

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1 hour ago, Sledgehammer said:

Ok this is the place to be for steam knowledge so I picked up something today that you fine purveyors of antique information will Hopefully know about. I think it is a whistle without a trigger mechanism? Barrel is 3" diameter and 6" long. The inlet threads are in poor shape but the price was very good. It came from an estate sale. E4F18E7E-4CE9-448F-B02E-638EA9491B6E_zps

129AEDB3-BC17-4E22-B332-C2F35672FCAA_zps

E415F273-4790-42BF-B095-F2A3808F01E8_zps

Sledgehammer..... Todd, you "done good!" I could foresee making a new "acorn" atop the whistle in a lathe and those steam valves are available. This is an old pair of whistles with a bunch of other brass I bought in a lot one time. I got them for pennies, so I can't complain. The whistle on the right has its acorn and it never had a valve. The whistle on the left has its acorn, but the whistle valve is removed. It had a connected valve.

594f251accd72_whistleslubricators_edited-1.thumb.jpg.550bb83614ee2f289401c306e645acf3.jpg

I mounted both whistles on the wall of the shop so I can blow a whistle anytime I wish to. These are both used, modern valves I put on. I have a bunch of them.

594f265b76f8e_ShopWhistlesonairlineatSC5-9-13red.thumb.jpg.f7b0ff74a323b5cc70869a00dbed8cca.jpg

This is a photo of the tall steamboat whistle in the 1950's, mounted on the Nichols & Shepard we had then.  It shows the separate valve below. The other two whistles shown have the valve incorporated into the whistle. Good luck in your restoration of it. It will work without the acorn atop it, but they look more complete, as a steam whistle should look, with it. Gary;)

594f256c4d620_SteamboatwhistleonNSNov_1954.thumb.jpg.8afaf931d5e0a006c51fb2ff1f4d6a49.jpg

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Thank You Gary. I knew this would be the place to find out for sure what I had. I put some air to it with the compressor after posting that and was able to get some sound out of it. Where is the best place to look for a modern valve like you had in your picture from the shop wall?

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15 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

Thank You Gary. I knew this would be the place to find out for sure what I had. I put some air to it with the compressor after posting that and was able to get some sound out of it. Where is the best place to look for a modern valve like you had in your picture from the shop wall?

Let me check and see if I have another (good) valve. If I do, I'll get your address. You'll have to make a lever. They don't have to be fancy. Those two whistles in the shop just have a strap iron lever I made.  They don't have to be curved and fancy. Gary;)

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17 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

Sledgehammer..... Todd, you "done good!" I could foresee making a new "acorn" atop the whistle in a lathe and those steam valves are available. This is an old pair of whistles with a bunch of other brass I bought in a lot one time. I got them for pennies, so I can't complain. The whistle on the right has its acorn and it never had a valve. The whistle on the left has its acorn, but the whistle valve is removed. It had a connected valve.

594f251accd72_whistleslubricators_edited-1.thumb.jpg.550bb83614ee2f289401c306e645acf3.jpg

I mounted both whistles on the wall of the shop so I can blow a whistle anytime I wish to. These are both used, modern valves I put on. I have a bunch of them.

594f265b76f8e_ShopWhistlesonairlineatSC5-9-13red.thumb.jpg.f7b0ff74a323b5cc70869a00dbed8cca.jpg

This is a photo of the tall steamboat whistle in the 1950's, mounted on the Nichols & Shepard we had then.  It shows the separate valve below. The other two whistles shown have the valve incorporated into the whistle. Good luck in your restoration of it. It will work without the acorn atop it, but they look more complete, as a steam whistle should look, with it. Gary;)

594f256c4d620_SteamboatwhistleonNSNov_1954.thumb.jpg.8afaf931d5e0a006c51fb2ff1f4d6a49.jpg

The Whistle you have in the shop Gary would also come handy in the House instead of yelling Dinner you just blow the whistle. 

-Urs ;) 

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3 hours ago, U-C said:

The Whistle you have in the shop Gary would also come handy in the House instead of yelling Dinner you just blow the whistle. 

-Urs ;) 

Urs, It has nothing to do with your being Swiss, or me part Swiss, but when Grandma and Grandpa Yaeger went to Switzerland in 1910, she bought a big brass cow bell. Apparently she put it on their favorite milk cow's neck. The loop atop it may have gotten tangled in something, I don't know? But they found the bell lying on the ground. My ol' blacksmith dad took the bell and brazed a large nut atop it and put a handle on it. I salvaged the bell years ago, before it somehow went away. Dad had made a bracket out of a ca. 1917-25 Model T headlight bracket, by straightening it out and mounting it much like the bracket I built, after leaving Dad's bracket on the old house I grew up in. I bent a loop in the handle Dad had made and put a chain on it, with a wooden handle. It now hangs on the shop and it takes the place of the whistles inside for a dinner notification.

59504fea9bbcd_GrandmaYaegersSwisscowbellasdinnerbellred.thumb.jpg.d18403efcde266374a626a722e63990f.jpg

59504ff212272_GrandmaYaegersSwisscowbellred.thumb.jpg.6e37dfeaf7be97a39496ae229b788cde.jpg

So I don't think our Swiss heritage has much to do with dinner, or lack of using those whistles? Now I have this homemade steam whistle that I could hook up on an airline, outside, and use it for a dinner alarm. It sounds like a deep, deep steamboat whistle. I think it is a 6" brass bell.

595052a30120d_Machineroomjunkwhistleshelves12-22-15red_edited-1.thumb.jpg.cc87ff9e368ea0376bdf30e47a698a3e.jpg

And the shop has a shed hooked onto it. In that shed are IH tractors. That would make them IH Tractors on a Montana Farm too! I took this picture from atop a McCormick-Deering threshing machine. Gary;)

595051cde2d77_IHCTractorsFarmallsTD-40inshed6-2-17red.thumb.jpg.2008b98b466045b52df598aaeb1f93ca.jpg

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That whistle would sure take some air pressure to blow. 

 

If I get a chance to fool around with mine soon I might mount it to the wall inside my shop with a 3/4" whip hose directly to the accumulator tank so it doesn't get regulated and can get a large shot of air all at once. The whistle was like icing on the cake for me as I went to the sale looking at some blacksmithing tools. The Mayer Little Giant trip hammer went way out of my price range but I was able to bring home this foot operated Green River #3 vise. I've only seen one other one like it and was not able to buy that one.  It will clean up nicely and work well when bending and shaping quickly is needed. 

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Hammer- - - - - you sho' nuff done good with both the Vise and the whustle!!!!

In my tinkering around with my shop made air "whustle"- - - - - I just used an inexpensive handle operated ball valve (as used on spray rigs).  It would do for testing- - - - - no doubt a spring loaded valve would give more control for "making music".

*******

Professor- - - - - while we have Hammer's picture with the acorn nut off:

Is the bell of the whistle threaded so as to be able to adjust up or down and adjust the note (tone) of the whistle- - - - and the acorn nut acts as a lock nut (jam)????

DD

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And- - - - - we have a brass dinner bell In the kitchen that is similar, but probably slightly smaller than your Swiss bell.

It has a circular ring on top- - - - - and appears to have been mounted onto a shaft (has hole for a set screw in the ring).  Has what appears to be Latin lettering on it- - - - - but I never was able to find any Latin words to match.  Based on my research (several years ago)- - - - I believe it is one of a series of bells that would have been mounted onto a shaft at off- setting positions and utilized in churches.  Maybe someone here can tell me more about such an instrument???

Anyway- - - - I found it in an antique store  (for $5- -10) in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi a month or so before hurricane Katrina obliterated the entire gulf coast. (don't remember the year now) The little bell sure has a nice tone- - - - - not rung often; but always a pleasing sound when I hear it.

DD

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3 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

Hammer- - - - - you sho' nuff done good with both the Vise and the whustle!!!!

In my tinkering around with my shop made air "whustle"- - - - - I just used an inexpensive handle operated ball valve (as used on spray rigs).  It would do for testing- - - - - no doubt a spring loaded valve would give more control for "making music".

*******

Professor- - - - - while we have Hammer's picture with the acorn nut off:

Is the bell of the whistle threaded so as to be able to adjust up or down and adjust the note (tone) of the whistle- - - - and the acorn nut acts as a lock nut (jam)????

DD

Anson, That bell is made to find the "sweet spot" in the loudest (or if preferred, softest) sound. The tuning is in the displacement of the bell of the whistle. The acorn just locks the bell in place.

Sledgehammer, That vise looks interesting. I've never seen one.

My dad had a Little Giant trip hammer like the one below. It sold at the last auction sale. I sort of wish I'd kept it, but it was a heavy piece of history to pack around. And if you'd gotten a trip hammer, we'd have to change your name to "Triphammer." Gary;)

595091b8eabb9_LittleGiantTripHammerred.thumb.jpg.7826d94e2905b526af22329699fa31da.jpg

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Here's an old International from my families ranch used for logging in the 50's.

Should have bought the upgrade of a grill guard???

 

 

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Thanks for posting your picture for the "old Codger's forum" Brew!!!!!!

I believe that is a gas model T-6--------------what do ya'll think???

 

**************

Picture of our brass "dinner bell" that I mentioned last night.   At the top of the ring by which I am holding it is a threaded hole for a small set screw---------------bell measures 3.75 inches diameter across bottom.

Anybody got any insight as to what this may have come from------------and/or what the lettering might mean???  Glad I found it when I did------------otherwise it most probably would have been washed/blown away by hurricane Katrina.  The entire area  of Bay St. Louis where this shop was located was washed/blown away down to the concrete slabs.

 

5951c15310e41_bell_brass(fromBaySt.Louis).thumb.JPG.91703c0662ce48b8d08033198158933b.JPG
 

 

Hammer's whistle find is gonna get me back to working on my air "whustle" yet.

I have no musical talent-------but sure do enjoy the sounds of the big whistles and most any size bell.   This is my door bell at my office entrance at the farm shop ---------never could hear the electric door bell;  but we could hear this one!!!!  (just an old cast iron bell dated 1876 I believe)----------and that's my daughter and oldest grand daughter from about 20 years ago.

5951c602c028c_RiRiScarlettatbell.JPG.a60dfe3f077af5e29e730c429b5cd051.JPG

 

Most all of the old plantations down here had a large bell for the mules and labor to know when noon came;  --------and also know when  it was "quitting time".   Well--------the bell was probably more for the labor than the mules.  The old timers said many of the older mules would stop dead in their tracks at 12:00 noon and not go back to work until 1:00 PM---------using that clock in their head.

In reality----------I would get more sound and tone out this old bell if it was mounted higher and on a metal frame.  At this height and with the heavy wood mounts----------I would have to be muffling part of the sound.   The wood is from a creosote bridge timber.

 

DD

 

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The bell most likely says "Vocem Meam Audi Oui Tangit" (makes me sound smart huh?  Not really, just a google search). That means "whoever touches me will hear my voice". From what I read, they were used in Belgium and France as door bells in their time. Hope that helps a little DD. 

Nice toothy grin on that crawler Brews4me :). I like the picture. 

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Hammer- - - -

My wife has done some googling tonight- - - - - - - and it looks like you are dead on target with my bell being a door bell.  She found pictures- - - - - they had an elaborate rocker system with a bar that bolted to the top of the ring- - - - with a chain pull.

We will probably forego the "Rube Goldberg" design rocking mechanism and just keep on ringing it by hand (and calling it the dinner bell).

Thanks for the quick search results.

********

How is the cotton crop- - - - - should be getting close to seeing some blooms.

 

DD

 

 

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