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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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 tubacase yeah that's what's unique about those cc's you could convert them to a standard by removing the gooseneck, pinning (need 3 pins & cotter pins) under a standard front axle, with the little riser block, ( to level the tractor)  and using standard draglink, rotate steering wheel till the side arm points down, instead of up, connect draglink, and you'er off, with your new standard tractor but it's now called a cc3. of course it still has turning brakes,and adjustable tall rear wheels. its possible you need to change out the side steering arm for a shorter one.?  rroommm!!!:)

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 Well, I may have gotten off by one digit.  It seems the CC3 was a tricycle row-crop, and the CC4 was the 4 wheel standard conversion. :blush: You could change back and forth with the front end.   

My cousins a little older than me say their father had a CC in 1929 although the books say the CC didn't come out until 1930 (at one time they were using 4 cc's) (they farmed near Robstown, TX about 20 miles from Corpus Christi), .  In the book Full Steam Ahead, p.172 it is stated that 'Model CC testing finally began in Corpus Christi, Texas, in early March 1929'.  Then on p.174 it says 'Everyone who tried it liked it.'  'Deere and IH were both testing similar units of their own in the area, and field reports indicated that by the end of most days, the competitors' personnel were out watching the Model CC perform'.  I've heard before that many of the companies tested in this area because we more or less could work our land year round.  

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Here's another tractor for you Case guys. I do know it is pulling a wire tie Case hay baler, sort of like my uncle used to have. Those two guys putting in blocks, pushing, pulling and tying wire, got a lot of dirt.

58d9408919efb_CasesteelwheeltractorCasehay(hand)wiretiebaler.jpg.716c6bdcf5569efe3f7b313153870bf3.jpg

Here's one I'd never seen before. A "Christmas tree" Farmall A.

58d9409b57128_IHFarmallforChristmastrees.jpg.4038fdd248c38f18a95c7dbe58a32dae.jpg

And this one at a show had to demonstrate a little humor. They're not on any Montana Farms that I know of? Gary;)

58d940ea62e6a_IHFarmallforChristmastreesandaswinginoffseasonred..thumb.jpg.6fd52a378f2000d00ecae650dfbf6c31.jpg

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Gary, I hope you don't mind that I gave your music some more publicity in my latest video of the Merc. :-)

Sorry, no IH tractors in this one.  

 

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I've been watching for the Professor on the Moly- B polka party (RFD- TV) - - - - figure he will be easy enuff to spot with his polka dot cap and the Montana squeeze box.  The Moly- B gig will be on his way to Hollywood.B)

 

The Christmas tree Farmall A is something I haven't seen either.  Believe I would take the swing seat over the rigid mount seat.

Must have a chain drive up to a jack shaft- - - - and back down to the drive wheel??

********

I have had a discussion with the Maple syrup cookers on their cooking process under the on- going Maple Syrup thread- - - - - - quite interesting, if some of ya'll have never been exposed to syrup making- - - - - - you might enjoy checking it out.  (never too old to learn- - - - - just he!! remembering what you just learned!!)

DD 

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3 minutes ago, Delta Dirt said:

 

********

I have had a discussion with the Maple syrup cookers on their cooking process under the on- going Maple Syrup thread- - - - - - quite interesting, if some of ya'll have never been exposed to syrup making- - - - - - you might enjoy checking it out.  (never too old to learn- - - - - just he!! remembering what you just learned!!)

DD 

I missed the maple syrup thread but I have tried it from maples right here in my yard. The sap is slightly sweet right out of the tree but it takes a tremendous amount of time and energy (and sap) to make anything worthwhile. I tried it once or twice and it was a novelty but not something I'd bother with. It would likely be the most expensive syrup I ever ate. :-)

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Ralph, I don't mind you using my music at all. It has some bumps in the road, but most of my music does! The only charge I have is if you'll put it on Facebook, so I can share it to myself! I'd forgotten all about that first song, Wildwood Flower, with the harmonica, guitar and bass. I did all three instruments in that recording. Under the Double Eagle has always been a fun song for me to play, as it has the chorus played on the bass buttons of the accordion.

Anson, I'll have to look that Molly-B polka party. I don't know if we get it on our cable TV or not? Sharon is the TV watcher. I do have the TV running here in the den with Robert Duvall's Lonesome Dove in the background. I couldn't tell you much about the story. I did hear him in the background talking about visiting a lady at the local "house" with one of the other cow hands.

Another hay baler photo here. I think that is an old New Holland hay baler, and some form of a McCormick-Deering tractor. Note the ladies doing the baling job.

58d9c3aad26b3_LadiesbalinghaywithMcCormick-DeeringtractorNewHollandbaler.jpg.bd910bee1980d78adb8b4e2216bed621.jpg

And this is another McCormick-Deering tractor pulling a pull type combine. It might be a John Deere? I believe John Deere bought out Holt's metal combine line? This isn't in Montana. We did have a neighbor who had a John Deere pull type combine that harvested close to us. But he pulled his with a John Deere tractor, so it isn't this one. There are ladies here. I think they are collecting sacked grain onto a wagon? Gary;)

58d9c3a519ba5_McCormick-DeeringtractorpullingpulltypecombinemaybeJohnDeere.thumb.jpg.fbdb90d835dea174973b29feb9a45453.jpg

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Usually see the Molly B polka party on Saturday nights as we are surfing the TV for something decent to watch.  It's all polka style music with lots of accordions.  You should enjoy it.

*****

Lonesome Dove was a great show- - - -TV could use something similar nowadays.  Ol' Gus (Duval) was straight forward when visiting the "business lady" across the bridge- - - - - - - - when he would go shopping for a "poke". (nothing to do with cow poke):wacko::rolleyes:

*******

Wonder what the story is on the women baleing  hay and combining grain.  That looks to be pre WWII- - - - - - but bound to be war related????

DD

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that first McCormick-Deering tractor is a very early one, the dual tanks, w/ flat sides is either 15-30, or 22-36, but the early front wheels, w/ the cast spoke hubs w/ cast hub caps,,and the side covers w/ short louvers would mean an  early 15-30.the back wheels look to be 32 spoke heavy road wheels, w/ 1/2 the spokes cut off at the hub. looks to be a staged photo. during ww2 ?. young ladies learning to do absent mens work ?. something isn't right the truck is backing up to collect the bales ?, the 4 girls are carrying   the bale  from in front of the baler ? the flywheel isn't turning.?.        second photo looks to be later 15-30, because of the short LH fender. believe 22-36 would have long fender.    what is that frame work on the back?    . appears to be ussr.  how many russians does it take to run a combine?

Gary, I like your music also. can't get enough of that under the double eagle!!   i played cornet in high school band, got as far as " our boys will shine tonight",(football) i was the only one of my pals in band i quit, regret it every since.now, can't play anything.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

deering

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4 hours ago, Fred B said:

that first McCormick-Deering tractor is a very early one, the dual tanks, w/ flat sides is either 15-30, or 22-36, but the early front wheels, w/ the cast spoke hubs w/ cast hub caps,,and the side covers w/ short louvers would mean an  early 15-30.the back wheels look to be 32 spoke heavy road wheels, w/ 1/2 the spokes cut off at the hub. looks to be a staged photo. during ww2 ?. young ladies learning to do absent mens work ?. something isn't right the truck is backing up to collect the bales ?, the 4 girls are carrying   the bale  from in front of the baler ? the flywheel isn't turning.?.      

I was thinking the same that it was a staged photo op. The wagon load of bales does not appear to be hitched to the baler if they are actually supposed to be pulling it. And why the pitch fork to guide the swath into the baler? Still a nice photo but some who have "been there" will see the little inaccuracies. 

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2 hours ago, Loadstar said:

I was thinking the same that it was a staged photo op. The wagon load of bales does not appear to be hitched to the baler if they are actually supposed to be pulling it. And why the pitch fork to guide the swath into the baler? Still a nice photo but some who have "been there" will see the little inaccuracies. 

The girl on the tractor isn't watching where she is driving so the other girl has to pitch hay into the baler. Maybe the women wanted horses and the husbands said ok if you bale the hay to feed it.

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Steamboat's a coming:

Apparently the American Queen is headed south down the Mississippi River.  As I came across from the farm shop a few minutes ago- - - - - - - 4 large charter buses affiliated with the American Queen were headed south along Hwy 1.

The empty buses now track the riverboat up and down the River so that the boat passengers can tour some of the town's along the River.  Has not always been the case.

We went up to see the Riverboats come in several yrs ago in Greenville- - - - - and there was no  ground transportation for the passengers nor crew. I volunteered to show an older couple who had been visiting with my wife around town- - - - - - - turned out to be a retired doctor and his wife was a former mayor of Eugene, Oregon.   

Don't have a direct view of the River- - - - - but it is approximately 1 mile due west of our house.

WOOOOOO- - - - - - - - - -WOooooo- - - - wooo!!!B)

 

DD

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Quote

 The wagon load of bales does not appear to be hitched to the baler if they are actually supposed to be pulling it

If you look closer, you can see what appears to be a tailight, and a set of duals, so I think that for some reason the truck is backing up so the bales can be loaded, but I do agree that the picture appears to be staged, perhaps as a way to show women contributing to the war effort?

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Art, I thought maybe that photo was staged as well. Likely to show the ladies doing their part, with their men away at war?

Some more stuff to entice the Case guys. This is a huge, huge Case eagle. It'd likely sell for a thousand dollars at an auction sale today?

58dbf0808eab4_AveryearlyfairorexpositionandonereallylargeCaseeagle.jpg.b1de476529648e22cdc3a7d5858e41a2.jpg

Here are three methods used to load Case tractors on railroad flatcars at the Racine Factory. Gary;)

58dbf0e55516b_LoadingCasecrossmotortractorsonrailroadRRflatcars_edited-1.jpg.e98995be02fdab7ffa1adf3c67293f0c.jpg

58dbf11f8881e_LoadingaCaseroadrolleratfactoryontoflatcarred.jpg.b08af1aa9a9a6863cce89e76d315191c.jpg

58dbf1383e989_Loadinganew65Casesteamengineatthefactory.jpg.cea315d19af99bafbbfe555f82262c07.jpg

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5 minutes ago, Old Binder Guy said:

Art, I thought maybe that photo was staged as well. Likely to show the ladies doing their part, with their men away at war?

Some more stuff to entice the Case guys. This is a huge, huge Case eagle. It'd likely sell for a thousand dollars at an auction sale today?

58dbf0808eab4_AveryearlyfairorexpositionandonereallylargeCaseeagle.jpg.b1de476529648e22cdc3a7d5858e41a2.jpg

 

Probably taken at the first Half Century of Progress show at Rantoul IL...;)....all jokes aside, I like all the American flags flying in that pic also. I count at least 8 of them.

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18 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

Steamboat's a coming:

Apparently the American Queen is headed south down the Mississippi River.  As I came across from the farm shop a few minutes ago- - - - - - - 4 large charter buses affiliated with the American Queen were headed south along Hwy 1.

The empty buses now track the riverboat up and down the River so that the boat passengers can tour some of the town's along the River.  Has not always been the case.

We went up to see the Riverboats come in several yrs ago in Greenville- - - - - and there was no  ground transportation for the passengers nor crew. I volunteered to show an older couple who had been visiting with my wife around town- - - - - - - turned out to be a retired doctor and his wife was a former mayor of Eugene, Oregon.   

Don't have a direct view of the River- - - - - but it is approximately 1 mile due west of our house.

WOOOOOO- - - - - - - - - -WOooooo- - - - wooo!!!B)

 

DD

Here are a couple of photos taken from the roof of your barn and house, Anson! Gary

Steamboat Mark Twain pushing barge, Mark C.jpg

Steamboats Belle of the Bends and Belle of Calhoun. Memphis, 1906 Timn A.jpg

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I came across this and figured several of the regular contributors in this thread would like the subject matter.  Noted as a pre-1930 auction.

http://www.auctionzip.com/cgi-bin/auctionview.cgi?lid=2798973&kwd=pre-1930&zip=62806&category=0

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32 minutes ago, Old Binder Guy said:

 

Some more stuff to entice the Case guys. This is a huge, huge Case eagle. It'd likely sell for a thousand dollars at an auction sale today?

Gary;)

 

 

 

Gary, considering this medium sized Case eagle recently sold for $14,000 I can't even imagine what a giant like the one in your photo might sell for.Unless its made of plastic or papier mache" " :-)

 

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7 hours ago, Loadstar said:

Gary, considering this medium sized Case eagle recently sold for $14,000 I can't even imagine what a giant like the one in your photo might sell for.Unless its made of plastic or papier mache" " :-)

 

Just have to find that guy with the deep love for Case and a thick, thick wallet, I guess, Ralph?

Yesterday was "Diesel Tuesday" on Old Farm Tractor site on Facebook. This picture I put on (It was larger) was quite a hit. And this 1936 TD-40 TracTracTor by McCormick-Deering is an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm too! Gary;)

58dc618596912_TD-40outside11-4-2013red_miniature_edited-1.jpg.dec88ab92ef23f599492d7f71ecc4826.jpg

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I am thinking that the eagle on the globe at the CASE tent is probably a one-of-a-kind as I have never seen one in that pose.  I have seen 2 that are enlarged versions of the one Ralph posted; one is at at Rollag and the other is on the football field of Chadron State College.

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My brother has 2 Case Eagle/Globe statues. Both are about the size of the one pictured. No idea what he paid for them, and never asked. Heard a rumor around 15k each, but none of my business. One is painted original colors, and spotlighted and mounted in his yard. He has the other hidden somewhere. He has lots of old,old Case stuff. Including a wooden beam walking plow that still (faintly) shows the color and name painted on the beam. Made in 18xx something.  If I wasn't photo challenged, I'd get some pictures.  

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I sure don't know anything and am having to scrounge to post.... I did save this photo from Facebook. I spent hundreds and hundreds of hours over the years as a youngster, running Dad's Farmall Super A, pulling a pair of IH side delivery rakes. They weren't this high wheel type. They were all low wheel type. But this scenario sure woke me up. I didn't like raking. I liked mowing, but the big guys got to do that and I was "made" to rake. Oh well... I still wouldn't trade my childhood for anyone else's.

58deda0677c16_IHFarmallSuperApullingIHrake.jpg.c71c3e6ab219456e3e9b28541b8e6dde.jpg

This was a 402 IH Pull type combine on Facebook. I never saw a pull type combine of this "new" era.

58deda18a2516_IH402pulltypecombinebehindIHtractorJoelHanson.jpg.6d4dc471f93482c7f47568f7fff311ff.jpg

I was very familiar with a 403 IH combine though! This one.

58dedb054f68e_403WindrowSpecialIHCombine.jpg.f2c53adcd86658da0e5b6958ac9c97be.jpg

This was posted this morning. I've posted it on here before. The IH Farmall F-22 prototype. I doubt more than one was built?

58deda0e10ecb_ExperimentalF-22IHCFarmalltractor.jpg.507e5d9cb12447ad21b1292c6a7fc5af.jpg

Something I had always wished I could have had again was a steel wheel Regular. Dad and his brothers had welded rims for rubber tires on their Regulars and F-20. Gary;)

58deda24696bc_IHCFarmallRegularonRoyMerriottfarmnearEsthervilleIowa121936.jpg.0824c101292b0eabcdadb2fe5389341c.jpg

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Professor- - - - -

Lots of switch over to rubber down this way also Professor.

Still got two Regulars left over from my Dad- - - - - - neither run anymore.  But one has steel rears- - - - without the lugs.  For years- - - - - this Regular had a belt driven 250 amp Lincoln welder mounted on it.  Many a time as a kid- - - - I would get the opportunity to drive the old Regular to the field for a repair job.  These were smooth steel rims- - - - - - - but I can promise you those steel wheels did not flex!!!!:huh:

Several years ago in my travels- - - - I ran up on a set of Regular rear steel wheels with the lugs- - - - - And was able to buy them at a reasonable price.  They are still propped up where I unloaded them waiting on my restoration project to begin on the Regular.  One thing I do really appreciate about the steel wheels- - - - - - - so far, I have yet to have to air one of them up!!!

Took a tough soul to ride those steel wheels for 12 hrs a day- - - - - - don't believe today's generation  could handle it.

That old Lincoln would burn a 1/4 inch rod- - - - - - - giving the old Regular a full load on the belt.  I later mounted it on a trailer with a pto drive- - - - - ran it off of a  Farmall M and sometimes the little 9N Ford for lighter work.  Finally got where you couldn't keep the amps from creeping up on you- - - - - but sure would burn a rod when it was right.

DD

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I enjoy reading all these posts.  This is my steel wheel story.        My dad's first tractor was a JD GPWT, he said it made him so mad he swore he'd never buy another JD,  then he got a IH Reg and liked it a lot better.  He then in 1933 traded a pair of mules, some bundled hegira, (a sorghum type for cattle feed), and some money for a new case CC on steel, which he really liked.  One day a couple years later he was working near the road, and a man with four new tractor wheels and tires in a pickup stopped and asked my dad to try the new rubber tires out.  They were on rod spoke F&H wheels.  He said he would put them on and would come back in a week.  If liked, dad could buy them, if not he would put the steel back on.  Dad kept the rear on rubber, but put the front steel back on as the tractor on front rubber would skid too much on turns.  To this day that Case rear steel is still out there under the shed.  When Dad first told me that, I wondered why someone would have a wheel for that Case tractor in his pickup.  Later when I started collecting tractors, I realized that the JD GPWT, the Farmall Reg and 20 and the Case CC, Allis Chalmers WC and maybe some others all had the same 6 bolt rear wheel pattern.  I remember the time in the mid 50s when dad sold that old CC for $50. i watched it go down the road. several years later my brother and i were poking  around in a corpus christi scrap yard, and found it up in a pile of  scrap. too bad.  I do have CCs that I bought later.  

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