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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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Loadstar- - -

Will most likely be taking the wings off- -- - the basic unit width of 13 ft will be enuff load for the 2090.  I have pulled a IH 480 and 390 (??) at that width before with it and got along fine.

edit:  our soils range from sandy loam to heavy clay- - - - - either can bury a disc blade depending on moisture conditions; - - - - - - and either soil can bake in the summer heat and become as hard as pavement during extended dry spells.

Wish my tractor was as clean as yours.  Always enjoy your videos- - - - - - better remember where you park it.   If you leave it outside- - - - -with it being white, you might not find it in all of that snow!!!!:lol:

DD

 

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Anson, It sound good to Deplorable me too!

Don't know one darn thing. Am getting ready to go to opthamologist, so this is short. A couple of Farmall Cubs. A 1951 model owned by a Facebook friend:

58bda049ee391_DustiSnideronPoppys1951IHFarmallCub.jpg.a39a90d3278a11238538b0fd40f02b30.jpg

 And a newer one with the flat grille. I don't know how late IH built these? Dad's Farmall Cub was a 1947 model. Gary;)

58bda074eaf24_IHFarmallcublatestyleJayPhillips_edited-1.jpg.da25e6f56d78a03e627b78b9d75c7d9f.jpg

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I don't usually get my tail in a "political knot," but the Democratic party of Montana elected Rob Quist as their candidate to run for the vacant seat of Montana Representative Ryan Zinke, who vacated the spot to be the new Department of the Interior head.

58be482c67edd_RobQuistyouregisteryourcartodrivewhynotregisteryourgunsidiotdemocrat.jpg.130a30c00b44de569b259b6f1f2c4fd2.jpg

I really don't think Montanan's are dumb enough to elect someone who out and out advocates registration of firearms. What the banjo player (Rob Quist) may not realize, driving an automobile is a privilege. Gun ownership through the Second Amendment  of the United States Constitution, is a God given right. This Bernie Sanders clone is left of Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi. I really don't think Montanans are stupid enough to vote this.... this.... this guy in, but oodles of Californians have sold out down there and brought their political ideas, money and how local laws should be enforced like they were in California. 10 years ago Montana had 600,000 people. Now we've got a million, and it's not all from Montanan's making babies. I've emailed the NRA tonight, but I don't know what else to do, but lose sleep. 

I don't know much greek, but I've got this one down pat. (Turn in your swords.... Come and take them) Gary;)

58be47fbc4418_Molon-Labe-CFComeandgetthem(firearms)Greekred.thumb.jpg.a490c1d23cfc6bad167e869a403762da.jpg

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Spot on

I have not seen where it says that the right to own a street legal vehicle shall not be infringed

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7 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

I don't usually get my tail in a "political knot," but the Democratic party of Montana elected Rob Quist as their candidate to run for the vacant seat of Montana Representative Ryan Zinke, who vacated the spot to be the new Department of the Interior head.

58be482c67edd_RobQuistyouregisteryourcartodrivewhynotregisteryourgunsidiotdemocrat.jpg.130a30c00b44de569b259b6f1f2c4fd2.jpg

I really don't think Montanan's are dumb enough to elect someone who out and out advocates registration of firearms. What the banjo player (Rob Quist) may not realize, driving an automobile is a privilege. Gun ownership through the Second Amendment  of the United States Constitution, is a God given right. This Bernie Sanders clone is left of Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi. I really don't think Montanans are stupid enough to vote this.... this.... this guy in, but oodles of Californians have sold out down there and brought their political ideas, money and how local laws should be enforced like they were in California. 10 years ago Montana had 600,000 people. Now we've got a million, and it's not all from Montanan's making babies. I've emailed the NRA tonight, but I don't know what else to do, but lose sleep. 

I don't know much greek, but I've got this one down pat. (Turn in your swords.... Come and take them) Gary;)

58be47fbc4418_Molon-Labe-CFComeandgetthem(firearms)Greekred.thumb.jpg.a490c1d23cfc6bad167e869a403762da.jpg

When is the Special election...

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Did you see a lot of Cubs and smaller tractors like that in your part of the world Gary?  Once in a while we see them here but they always have a belly mower on them and not the more traditional cultivators or implements .  It seems like they were never used for farming here locally.  When a person could afford a tractor it was more of a traditional rowcrop tractor vs the smaller offset rigs.  I always thought they were interesting little rigs and would be fun for small jobs so I picked one up last weekend.  It is a later model than the Cub but would be a big brother in the same family I would think.  It came from PA but is now an IH tractor on an Illinois farm 

51BE3F94-DA1C-474E-A113-9C1BC22DC7CD_zps

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10 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

Did you see a lot of Cubs and smaller tractors like that in your part of the world Gary?  Once in a while we see them here but they always have a belly mower on them and not the more traditional cultivators or implements .  It seems like they were never used for farming here locally.  When a person could afford a tractor it was more of a traditional rowcrop tractor vs the smaller offset rigs.  I always thought they were interesting little rigs and would be fun for small jobs so I picked one up last weekend.  It is a later model than the Cub but would be a big brother in the same family I would think.  It came from PA but is now an IH tractor on an Illinois farm 

51BE3F94-DA1C-474E-A113-9C1BC22DC7CD_zps

Todd, while the first motorized item I ever drove was Dad's 1947 Farmall Cub, there weren't a lot of them in Montana, to my knowledge. Besides getting the milk cows after school as a first grader, Dad soon turned me loose cultivating his 1.5 acre garden. When I was 9, I got to go to the hay field and cut hay right along with the big guys and their bigger Farmalls. As I remember the newness wore off in a day or two, but Dad made sure I stayed for the duration. Gary;)

PS: I'll bet you get a lot of enjoyment out of your 140 Todd.

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I thought I was over the crud, and I'm now hacking around (aint purty neither) and headed in for antibiotics tomorrow. Since I have history with pneumonia, I'm playing it safe. I sure don't know much. I was kind of hoping Roger might post the videos from Al Severson's Big Four tractor engine, they started to break in today. But, he might be slightly busy these days too. Here are a few photos from Facebook. This first isn't a photo, but it's of an early IH van, that I understand were contracted with IHC from Willys? I don't know any more about that. They kind of reminded me a little of a 1932 Ford.

58c0dd252c905_InternationalIHHarvesterhalftonvanbodytruckSamMoorered.thumb.jpg.dfb241c13d49e1319514020bbe53affe.jpg

An Italian friend on Facebook posted this photo today of ladies operating what I think is an IH TD-9 there.

58c0dd4d5e71b_IHTD-9crawlerinItaly.jpg.2d9e7f197d990479f590985882a8fae4.jpg

Another friend posted this photo of his IHC AutoWagon.

58c0dd3868238_IHCAutoWagonJustinWeber.jpg.d0554086609da7afd0d9ad08bcdd74df.jpg

And last but not least is this nice looking Farmall M with an old (no down pressure) IHC front end loader like my dad had. I remember Dad having me clean out the barn's lean to, years ago with it. It took some doing, but I finally got it done. No down pressure, push on the clutch and the belly pump wouldn't lift, no power steering and plenty of poles to operate around in the shed. But I got it! It beat a manure fork and a wheel barrow!  Gary;)

58c0dd2e17c59_FarmallMandInternationalHarvesterIHloaderearlytypeMylesRalston.thumb.jpg.97ab371b80cfc8e01ecd2d52b9e1d44b.jpg

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A couple more of those early IH trucks purportedly built for them by Willys. Sam Moore posted these photos and he's always very knowledgeable. He writes lots of magazine articles on our old junk.

58c1bbecb276e_IHhalftonpickupKramsLiveFishSamMoorered.thumb.jpg.324bdd4a92493f34ac0c782dde3b10de.jpg

58c1bbf921e33_IHHalftonVanBangsIceCreamSamMoorered.thumb.jpg.dea2ccc5007d5e2cafd9b246b9324104.jpg

I think this is a D-30 IH Truck, and not a D-40? It got rather rough on this GMC Truck.

58c1bc185f306_D-30IHTrucktipsoverGMCTruckGaryW.jpg.44a010a2ff7aabe00fca9d974b91ff6b.jpg

And I'm just posting this photo of an IHC F-30 gas tank area. I just thought it was pretty. Even if it isn't on a Montana Farm. Gary;)

58c1bc251310a_FarmallF-30IHC.jpg.d3c402fe3105e871aa6687764404c337.jpg

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Here's what Roger has been working on very diligently for a couple or more years now. He sent me the video above of them breaking in Al Severson's Big Four gas tractor engine. The engine is pretty much "manufactured" by them. Roger would have to tell us the numerous castings they made, and they are working on four of these big babies. Those rear wheels are 8' tall on a Big Four. This is the tractor that this engine will be dropped (gingerly) into.

58c1bee046ce8_AlSeversonsBigFourGasTractor3-9-17red.thumb.jpg.2c5d80506a17a0b24a7abde6977b8fba.jpg

This is  a photograph of the engine they are breaking in.

58c1beeac8d53_AlSeversonsBigFourGasTractorenginegettingbrokein3-8-17.thumb.jpg.3b0eb851e35376fd5c577dbf2f0462d5.jpg

Al and Harriet Severson are posing with the Big Four Tractor, minus engine, he bought at a late friend of mine (Morris Blomgren's) auction sale several years ago. Gary;)

58c1bef14c8b4_AlHarrietSeversonsBigFourgastractor.jpg.f894b8a26116f5a4e4358f528ec3f644.jpg

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Well.... I'm on a potent antibiotic. Something pretty new. I asked for my old standby penicillin (Oxacillin makes me nauseus) but he wouldn't do that. When I lived on Beaver Creek, growing up on the homestead, I would have almost called these boluses, rather than pills. I remember the old chrome plated bolus inserter, we stuck down the sick cow's mouth. But I don't have that machine anymore. So I'm swallowing these.

I found some neat things on Facebook. I always love the old IHC Moguls and Titans. They were as much the start of the "small tractor" revolution as was Henry Ford's Fordson. They may not have had the styling the Fordson had, but they sure tickle my eyes, when I see one. This one is an 8-16 Mogul with a plowing steering guide.

58c340b4c68be_IHC8-16MogulwithplowingguideMarkC.jpg.b224f5d38b6de12fccde01b1eef531bf.jpg

Roger, if he wants to tickle his eyes, he only has to walk out to the back shed and look at his. As a matter of fact, I wouldn't doubt but what it's in the shop/garage, instead of his pickup? This is a 10-20 Titan and I love it in its work clothes.

58c340d9a57a1_IHC10-20Titantractorinworkclothes.thumb.jpg.ef20b1d22faf01234fa334f60534b574.jpg

Here are some IHC AutoWagons at a dealership. Purportedly a 1915 photo. That was the last year these were produced, I believe.

58c340cfd3fbf_IHCDealership1915threeAutoWagonswatercooledRonHoult.jpg.ed156f7f73f2007e149098aa2cb80604.jpg

And last but not least is this black & white picture of an IHC "red truck." The dealerships used to haul around items they had for sale, such as the Type M gas engine and the washing machines, for this farm wife. He probably had timed it at about 11:AM, so he'd be invited to stay for dinner (it wasn't lunch back then). My mother often remarked about machinery salesmen and dinner time. Gary;)

58c340c16321e_IHCRedtruckwithTypeMgasengineandwashingmachinesdemonstratingBobbyBlair.jpg.3f406446eee7c9f7c63d625012642365.jpg

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Here are three pictures, and two examples of McCormick-Deering dealer's red IH trucks. Red Baby seems to be a late terminology? The first two show the Type M gasoline, kerosene engine, plus a bunch of binder twine, for the binder behind them in the field.

58c344fabbdd9_IHCInternationalHarvesterredtruckwithTypeMengineinback.jpg.dd772e8058d656637aba9f0361e66124.jpg

58c344eac547a_IHCRedSixSpeedSpecialdealertruckTypeMenginered.thumb.jpg.e94aabecac9aaf0e496dfd00adba5441.jpg

This is a little later type, and had the Red Baby name.

58c344a6c7e7b_1927McCormick-DeeringIHCRedBabysixspeedspecialtruckInternationalHarvester.jpg.05c038aaf252e218d75e7856506b2a70.jpg

And last, but not least, I'd posted this on the Old Tractor page on Facebook today. It's the 1935 F-12 belted onto Mike's Hero Feed grinder. And she's an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm!  Gary;)

58c345873a887_IHCFarmallF-12beltedtoHeroGrinderred.thumb.jpg.47ef115ee1d5a19919e3cedad750a621.jpg

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Professor- - - -

In the sequence of the IHC truck line- - - - - what model followed the AutoWagon??  (Shovel Nose??)

Roger sure seems to be hoarding a lot of prize posessions- - - - - - but with you and your ever lasting case of crud;  I reckon we need to wait on warmer weather before we make the raid.:ph34r:

 

DD

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I just returned from the dentist. I had to have a crown re-glued. It's an important one that holds a corner of my partial in place. I think I only have six days of antibiotic left to take too. I'll be just like new, only old, before I know it! Here are some things that I absconded from Facebook. Otherwise I know and have nothing. Except RALPH GOFF! He's going to be sending me to the Oscars next year, I think. But that's over on Facebook, so I won't go into it here! I always loved the early International Harvester Company automobiles. I know nothing about them, so I can't tell you which model this beautiful touring car is.

58c6da910ba6d_IHCTouringCarMikeMcKnightred.thumb.jpg.1a367db375198181cf947d0c9928bc40.jpg

Here is a Regular on a farm near Estherville, Iowa in 1937. I have an affinity toward Regulars. Alway have, and at this late date, I likely always will?

58c6da9606ee8_IHCFarmallRegularonRoyMerriottfarmnearEsthervilleIowa121936.jpg.8fcf4f2e95701e4bbc4f6bb400715410.jpg

A Facebook friend posted this picture of an IHC Mogul pulling a Case threshing machine. 

58c6dab26e129_IHCMogulpullingCasethreshingmachineGaryW.jpg.e2573b348540c9111cec5702f381fe43.jpg

But this is an IHC Mogul plowing in central Montana. The only reason it is a little more special is that it is an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm! Gary;)

58c6dc4d336d6_PHOTO02339IHCMogulplowingincentralMontana.thumb.jpg.7147dd86f85a51334e3ba2aff051de85.jpg

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11 minutes ago, Old Binder Guy said:

Here are some things that I absconded from Facebook. Otherwise I know and have nothing. Except RALPH GOFF! He's going to be sending me to the Oscars next year, I think. But that's over on Facebook, so I won't go into it here! 

! Gary;)

 

Since you mentioned it Gary I will post the link to the video referred to. I put this one together recently and thought Gary's accordion music seemed to fit well with the video. Drone videos have no sound so it was either music or my boring commentary as a sound track. :-) And just to stay on topic, if you look really close in the final seconds of the video you might see the IH tractor on a Sask. farm. 

 

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OBG really out-did himself in posting the kind of Internationals that I like and have worked with for nearly 50 years.  Let's see now an 8-16 Mogul with a plow guide, 10-20 Titan, a bunch of late model Autowagons and that was followed by some "Red Baby" photos/Ads.  The Red Baby was known as the Model S and came out in 1922, but the first trucks were only sold to dealerships for service trucks.  Later that year they were then sold to the public, mean while, the heavy trucks continued on with the Shovel Nose design until the end of 1923. Then Gary posted a photo of my 1920 Shovel Nose (Model H) and a photo of the International truck design used starting in 1924.  The photo of the International car, a J-30, would have been built in 1910 or 1911, the only years IHC built conventional type automobiles.  By the way, that car is up for auction this spring and I'm sure it will bring MAJOR $$$$!  Last, but not least, was a photo of a 30-60 (2-cylinder) Mogul followed by a picture of a 15-30 Mogul (1 cylinder).

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I've been assisting Al and Harriet Severson's with the Big Four project.  The Big Four tractors were built in Minneapolis from 1906 until 1918. 

58c74c81a0638_Russel4large.jpg.2546585a5e7267cf1a7fd08d059588b9.jpg

I was involved with the restoration of the one pictured below about 25 years ago.  That tractor is owned by Steve Bauer and is displayed/operated at HastingsMN. 

 

58c74bf8e7e33_StevesBig4.jpg.db90e27b5ca919645c3e4787ffd2f755.jpg

Below are some photos of the Severson's Big Four restoration/recreation project.  Four complete engines are being built, plus parts for 10 other engines.  These are all new castings that have to be machined.  They are also building five complete transmissions and parts for seven others.  There are also about 50 other misc. castings in various numbers for other component for the tractors.

DSCN1787.jpg.d13ce554e8fbec62f8e06ff086a95562.jpg DSCN1794.jpg.5dd1d4655e152838a7a62285b48ab257.jpg DSCN1800.jpg.ddaaaa2af46fb45331549caa3a60e3dc.jpg

There is a great thread on SMOK-STAK that tells the story . . . it is a very long thread.  Here are links that show a video of me pouring the main bearings and also fitting the bearings.    The other photos show just some of the castings that will be machined for this major, world watched, project. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWmwRo0BRLA

http://www.smokstak.com/forum/showthread.php?t=81774&page=24 (middle of the page)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8kCOsekGc0

 As of today, we have had the first Big 4 tractor engine running for a total of about 5 hours. We hooked up a hose for water and controlled the flow to bring the engine up to temperature. We are currently running the governor to control the maximum engine speed at 500 RPM. After running it for about ½ hour, we changed the oil and washed the crankcase out.  The oil was also changed after another 2 ½  hours of running. We used 10-30 detergent oil for the break in process. The engine seems to be running well with no issues such as overheated bearings or tightening up. This was a concern because the tolerances we have are much tighter than the original specs. The video Gary posted shows the engine running after about 4 hours and the engine seems to be settling down and running smoothly.  During that run of 45 minutes, all of the cylinders were within about five degrees running temp of each other.  We ran the water temperature around 200 degrees. We were also able to get the governor to reliably control the engine speed at varying loads. After running the engine, we did a temperature probe on all the rod and main bearings and they were within 5 degrees of one another.

Below is a link of that first ½ hour the engine was running.

https://youtu.be/FJyXcDmlC_4

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Loadstar- - - 

You just about out did yourself on the drone video with Gary and the squeezebox music in the background.  Very scenic scene - - - - and very relaxing music;  just what I needed after spending a day "straining my brain" searching legal descriptions on a couple of convoluted/complicated farmland projects that I am working  on.

Don't know the name of Gary's tune- - - - but really enjoyed it.  Am hoping to get him to playing some of our howling Mississippi Delta Blues tunes- - - - after he plays his gig on the Moly B Polka Party- - - - - - and ya'll make your trip to the Oscars.

A howling squeezebox would surely qualify Gary for a "Montana Blues Trail" marker- - - - - - like the Mississippi Blues Trail Markers we see scattered around the Delta, that tourist come from far away to marvel over.  Ironically- - - - most of those blues greats were just one of some cotton planters' farmhands that liked to lay out all night in some juke house and show up for work the next morning with a bad hangover while sometimes singing the Blues while plowing cotton with a F- 20 or M/Super M Farmall.  (I gots da Super M blues- - - - and da boss gots the red a$$)  could have easily fit many a situation on Monday morning here on the Delta Blues scene.

It was just part of the local scene to us- - - - - - - now it's a legendary industry.

Gotta git the Professor to whip us out some blues tunes- - - - - - - - and you do the video work.  (I will act as ya'll's agent)- - - - - - - Easy Street is right around the corner for all of us!!!!B)

If I was just younger and more active in my real estate practice- - - - - would have to have me a drone and Go Pro camera.

********

Congratulations Roger.  IMPRESSIVE is not an adequate description for what ya'll have done on the Big Four project.

 

DD

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Better post up a picture of one of the Mississippi Blues Trail markers, so that "SqueezeBox Yaeger" will know what his Montana Blues Trail marker should look like.   These markers are scattered all over the Delta marking where the blues musicians called home-----and an unbelievable number of tourist follow the map from one marker to the other.

58c808fba7a30_MsBluesTrailMarker_GatemouthMoore.JPG.31795f2fd1efec554c108fbf3e7a7624.JPG

 

I never knew of "Gatemouth" Moore until this marker was placed in Yazoo City, Mississippi (in front of U-Bon's Bar-B-Q  that I stop at from time to time).   I am hoping that Gatemouth was truly a dedicated minister/preacher----------by local standards, that would have been somewhat uncommon back in those days when the black preachers preached the message:  "Don't do as I do-----Do as I say".  

Some of the primary benefits of being the preacher back during the "plantation days"-----------was that the preacher got to know the sisters of the church much better and could ocassionally give them a good dose of religion;------------or maybe the sister would give him a good dose of religion?  Regardless------------the preacher would get his pants zipped back up and be preaching the sermon Sunday morning.:ph34r::o

 

***********************

Anyway---------------I sure enjoyed the accordian music along with Ralph's cold weather video last night.  That tune is along ways from the blues sound of a howling harmonica and whomping drum beat.

Was thinking later on---------------what I need on my junked up and deplorable shop yard is a covering of that white stuff like Ralph had in his video.   Sure looks like everything is clean and neat from the drone's perspective!!!!

 

DD

 

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Roger... Now you're the one who outdid himself! Thank you for taking the time to post all of that. I know it doesn't just happen. You have to sit down and spend close to an hour finding things to put there. I was hoping you'd post Al Severson's project like you did! Thank you my friend.

Ralph, Thank you for posting that neat video you took with your camera in the sky! I can't post videos anymore. Me and photobucket don't get along anymore. They were trying to extort money from me to do anything more, since I'd used up the "free part." So I get along without them. You know Ralph, we'll probably be meeting and sitting in our tuxedos at the Oscars in about 11 months? We can make a short statement about "Red Power Magazine Forum" and our friends here when we accept our Oscars?

Anson, I don't know any Mississippi tunes offhand. Well, lets see. Mom used to sing a song back about 1948 about "Mr. & Mrs. Sippi" and that still circulates in my head occasionally. Those three tunes I played were: Missouri Waltz, Kentucky Waltz, and Tennessee Waltz. 

A couple of photos I stole from Facebook last night. They're sure not in Montana, but they are nice IH Tractors. This one of an assembly line during the days IH made my old 660 tractor. 

58c821c7c09e4_IHCTractorsontheassemblylineheadedforthedoorGaryW.jpg.203e544e7a9e3a777cb314f5a145dec3.jpg

Now this is from my files. It IS an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm. Son Mike stirring rocks with the Schafer plow and 660.

58c82237662ee_IH660SchafferplowMikeca1978.thumb.jpg.b6fdf5dd02f33fb577a464500aae077a.jpg

This was the other photo from Facebook I stole. Son Mike, and I, have each owned a 300 Utility, the workhorses of the farm. I even overhauled mine and put 350 sleeves and pistons in mine. This IS a 350 and the guy did a nice job of restoring it. Gary;)

58c821bd35f83_IH350UtilityrestoredChuckFoland.jpg.99106b34695f45d3a5e7c259a7f5cf9d.jpg

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15 hours ago, Roger Byrne said:

I've been assisting Al and Harriet Severson's with the Big Four project.  The Big Four tractors were built in Minneapolis from 1906 until 1918. 

58c74c81a0638_Russel4large.jpg.2546585a5e7267cf1a7fd08d059588b9.jpg

I was involved with the restoration of the one pictured below about 25 years ago.  That tractor is owned by Steve Bauer and is displayed/operated at HastingsMN. 

 

58c74bf8e7e33_StevesBig4.jpg.db90e27b5ca919645c3e4787ffd2f755.jpg

Below are some photos of the Severson's Big Four restoration/recreation project.  Four complete engines are being built, plus parts for 10 other engines.  These are all new castings that have to be machined.  They are also building five complete transmissions and parts for seven others.  There are also about 50 other misc. castings in various numbers for other component for the tractors.

DSCN1787.jpg.d13ce554e8fbec62f8e06ff086a95562.jpg DSCN1794.jpg.5dd1d4655e152838a7a62285b48ab257.jpg DSCN1800.jpg.ddaaaa2af46fb45331549caa3a60e3dc.jpg

There is a great thread on SMOK-STAK that tells the story . . . it is a very long thread.  Here are links that show a video of me pouring the main bearings and also fitting the bearings.    The other photos show just some of the castings that will be machined for this major, world watched, project. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWmwRo0BRLA

http://www.smokstak.com/forum/showthread.php?t=81774&page=24 (middle of the page)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8kCOsekGc0

 As of today, we have had the first Big 4 tractor engine running for a total of about 5 hours. We hooked up a hose for water and controlled the flow to bring the engine up to temperature. We are currently running the governor to control the maximum engine speed at 500 RPM. After running it for about ½ hour, we changed the oil and washed the crankcase out.  The oil was also changed after another 2 ½  hours of running. We used 10-30 detergent oil for the break in process. The engine seems to be running well with no issues such as overheated bearings or tightening up. This was a concern because the tolerances we have are much tighter than the original specs. The video Gary posted shows the engine running after about 4 hours and the engine seems to be settling down and running smoothly.  During that run of 45 minutes, all of the cylinders were within about five degrees running temp of each other.  We ran the water temperature around 200 degrees. We were also able to get the governor to reliably control the engine speed at varying loads. After running the engine, we did a temperature probe on all the rod and main bearings and they were within 5 degrees of one another.

Below is a link of that first ½ hour the engine was running.

https://youtu.be/FJyXcDmlC_4

After testing this first engine are you going to tear it down for a full inspection?

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