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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy
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Gary hope you beat the average and are better soon. Here the most common is drippy nose and sore throat  and fever that repeats about a week after your better. 

 

Thank you Gary for the Holt picture that sack slide doesn't seem to have stop on the bottom or it is tripped maybe. But as I understand they would try to dump the piles in rows across the field,and not on the extra steep places as well.

 

I am not sure what happened to Towner,I know the long time owner sold the company some time ago. The old ones had cast iron bearings. I have 12 foot 9 inch spaced one that has to be from the beginning of offset discs. The bearings have no place to put a grease fitting just a whole to drip some oil in,and the frame was not welded anywhere from the factory. All angle iron with 5/8 bolts. The ground here is all clay or adobe and the cast iron has lasted very well,but lots of limestone that breaks them. So back in the 60's my dad found a way to us a JD ball bearing and half spools as replacement.

IH always made there own disces back in the day or at least bought a company that did make things they wanted. The old IH disces where called Dyer built out here, have no idea if that is west coast company or what. I have one of those as well that still has all cast iron bearings. They used the same frame well into the 50's but at some time up graded to the tube axle with bearings or brass bushings inside. Which is the model Gary has the picture of as the grease fitting is in the end of the axle and the hanger is on the end of the frame. The Dyer disc had the best hitch as it was a T rather than the A you can see in DD picture of the Towner. The T style let you spin a crawler tractor around very short and never catch the hitch with a track.

 

DD I wish you well with the engineering project. I have done some of those myself.

 

 

Amazing to here of anything with government involvement could have the protective beams to keep dum people away from a old bridge.

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5 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

Hadn't thought about the wooden slide chain tensioners TwoStep.  Wonder what type of wood was used- - - -

DD

Oak, I think.  For both the tensioners and the "boxings".  At least that is what we made the replacements out of when we couldn't get anymore at the dealerships.  Straw walkers in some combines used the wood also.

Ron

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I'm still having the crud, with the sore throat. I don't remember them hanging on this long in the old days? Usually three or four days and things got better. Maybe old age has something to do with it? I've found some old cars on Facebook that have fascinated me. I hope you don't mind me putting them here for my entertainment. I'm for keeping it simple right now. This first photo is a "new" photo. It was taken at a Case gathering, and I don't remember where, but these are all JI Case automobiles.

58b5b31dc1346_CasecarsautomobileslinedupcropBWred.thumb.jpg.bb66b9daa40756157179f18595360bfb.jpg

I love this (guessing 1914) Model T Town Car or Taxi.

58b5b38ac1fc8_1914ModelTTownCarintowntaxiGaryWred.jpg.59dcda7d9bda5ccb4d7b2e4ee49d23f3.jpg

And a bakery van in Hawaii. I'm calling it a 1913.

58b5b3b123368_LovesBakerydeliveryvanModelTGaryW.jpg.d8d92c16561c3fb45c4621fa98ba2a54.jpg

Here is a "barn find" of new automobiles. The first two on the right are ca.1910 Maxwells. The next is a Ford Model K, I think? The rest who knows?

58b5b327805bf_Newcars2MaxwellsinbarnfindconditiondkGaryWred.jpg.afaedc48f69cfe44775fdbfec415b770.jpg

Here's a lineup of cars at Janesville, indiana. I have no idea what brand?

58b5b33fc1493_oldtouringcarsautomobilesinJanesvilleIndianaGaryWred.thumb.jpg.d315edf5b5c3037851037cb39aae1143.jpg

This is Dundurn Saskatchewan. The automobile owners must have decided to have a get together. The Model T Touring Car on this end would be no newer than 1911 or 12? 

Dundurn, Saskatchewan, 'the big automobile town' Mark C red.jpg

This last photo is of a showroom in Detroit. I don't know what they are. Gary;)

Detroit Automobile touring car show room showroom Gary W red.jpg

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This Canadian town got its Main Street loosened up some. It appears they were trying to grade it after a heavy rain. This poor old 25 hp Reeves cross compound kind of got bogged down in its work.

58b5b70d6f23c_25hpccReevesStuckinCanadiantown._edited-1.jpg.400551827228f9624304a05e620254bc.jpg

And it's time for an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm. My first recollection of a "new IH styled tractor" is Annie. She's a keeper for me. She was four years old when I was born, so she preceded me in this "ih tractor on a montana farm" bit.

58b5b73346d99_IHFarmallHAnnieTD-40backinshed10-30-16redcrop.thumb.jpg.fc1085a6642d638a732309af7bd00873.jpg

I'm sorry I've changed the venue and subject, but my old thinker just can't handle much more right now. Thanks guys! Gary;)

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Day nine for me, and day 12 for Sharon, with this crud. I think my over all "feeling better" has hit, but my throat is sorer today than when I went to bed last night. Friends have told Sharon it lasts almost three weeks. I hope they don't know what the heck they're talking about. 

Then to make things worse, It's our son in-law Brad's birthday today. We completely spaced it out and didn't send a card. At least he got the day off today and it sounds like he'll get a great supper tonight.

58b71f5c68c09_Bradwithfish7-2013.thumb.jpg.27580cdf9418e68498ebe6fd765215fe.jpg

I don't know one thing more. This must be for Roger, since it's a 10-20 IHC Titan and in corn country. The Mules might be for Anson, though? I'm sure that is corn they're picking? I can kind of tell from what Dad used to plant in his garden, that grew tall and died of frost before we ever got to eat any of it! Gary;)

58b71ffdca1bb_IHCTitanpullingonerowcornpickerGaryW.jpg.44dd32635f3a38bef33be37b0353c94f.jpg

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On ‎11‎/‎16‎/‎2006 at 3:49 PM, Old Binder Guy said:

I've got some photos I'd like to share. I was blessed with being born in Montana's Judith Basin country and I grew up over there, farmed & ranched, but moved here to Kalispell, Montana 25 years ago. I have many good and bad memorys, but wanted to share some good! The earliest tractor I remember there on the homestead was a Titan with four cylinders and four carburetors or mixers, when I was very young. It ran but got junked when a neighbor wanted to buy a rear wheel for a spring he was developing. ohmy.gif Before my time they had four 15-30s and two 22-36s. We were still haying with Farmall Regulars and an F-20 or 30 (I can't remember but it was red.). At my earliest memory we had one styled Farmall, a 1939 H. I still own it, use it, and it is FBH681, making it the 181st one built.

post-5643-1163709652_thumb.jpg

I've been accused of many things in my life but being "normal" isn't one of them. That's just a setting on a clothes dryer, anyway.

This first photo is far from my favorite, but it shows my dad on a 15-30 pulling a McCormick-Deering combine. As I recall, the tractor was well liked, but the combine.... Well, I remember it sitting in a fence corner, the motor used in "the old log shop" to power the line shaft.

This is a later photo. I don't remember when the Cub Cadet first came out, but this is the second one sold in Lewistown and my cousin bought the first one.

This is a picture of my nephew, "Ralphie", on Grandad's new Cub Cadet. I would like to point out the IH equipment in the distance. I see a 141 Combine, a TD-40, A 125SPVC Combine, A Farmall Super A, and a grain drill.
Gary wink.gif

post-5643-1163709901_thumb.jpg

Nice ! what did they call those binder combines? Hillside something??

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31 minutes ago, BinderGuyKyle said:

Nice ! what did they call those binder combines? Hillside something??

Kyle,

In spite of growing up on a farm that had one of those early pull type combines by IHC, I really don't know much about them. Dad sorely disliked the one they had. But I don't think the name "hillside" was any part of these early ones.

58b72a6c05c59_IHCRegularMcCormickCombineMarkC.jpg.71f6ffab348d3ce06163cb3d7498f008.jpg

Not long after the "first post" of mine you put on, Greg Druffel or "Palouse" came on with some hillside IH stuff. This was an IH 51 Pull Type Hillside combine they used.

58b72bd5a584d_IH51hillsidecombineGregDruffelca1950.jpg.080e9b5730abf262e03667fedc724af8.jpg

This was a picture of that 51 Hillside combine tipped over on its side, on one of those Palouse hills. It was being pulled by a TD-35 TracTracTor. Gary;)

58b72c8a12fe8_GregDruffletheircombinetippedoveronPalousehillspulledbyTD-35_edited-1.jpg.498f025aa2fc4842236b4dbba6a06e17.jpg 

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1 hour ago, 664 CDN said:

Gary, I would think they would have had better luck if the were combining with the header on the up hill side .

58b74a0eb1063_Palousehillsaccidentca1933Greg.thumb.jpg.5a9912e088817a542dee1bebfdd9f2cd.jpg

I don't know if that would have been a cure all or not, Ray? I think when the combine decided to go, it just went? I don't know I've never ridden a hillside combine? On Facebook people were asking why they didn't just run cows on the hills. But Greg said these wheat crops averaged over 100 bu per acres. So I don't know??

58b74abeded97_GregDrufflesIH151SPhillsidecombineinthePalouse.jpg.98769c161e029911515a280e82bcc179.jpg

We had lots of steep, steep "rolling hills" but we hit them head on, and didn't do the side hill thing. Gary;)

58b74ba4d334f_YaegerscombiningRumelyAudieFritz.jpg.6cbe73a4b4d94dab89d679a835eb1d2d.jpg

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Where is our old friend Palouse hanging out.  At one time- - - - - I was thinking he got signed back in under a different name???  Always enjoyed his posts- - - - check back in with us Greg.

National Gographic had an article on the Palouse region several years ago.  Steep hills- - - - - - record yields on wheat.

DD

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7 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

Kyle,

In spite of growing up on a farm that had one of those early pull type combines by IHC, I really don't know much about them. Dad sorely disliked the one they had. But I don't think the name "hillside" was any part of these early ones.

58b72a6c05c59_IHCRegularMcCormickCombineMarkC.jpg.71f6ffab348d3ce06163cb3d7498f008.jpg

Not long after the "first post" of mine you put on, Greg Druffel or "Palouse" came on with some hillside IH stuff. This was an IH 51 Pull Type Hillside combine they used.

58b72bd5a584d_IH51hillsidecombineGregDruffelca1950.jpg.080e9b5730abf262e03667fedc724af8.jpg

This was a picture of that 51 Hillside combine tipped over on its side, on one of those Palouse hills. It was being pulled by a TD-35 TracTracTor. Gary;)

58b72c8a12fe8_GregDruffletheircombinetippedoveronPalousehillspulledbyTD-35_edited-1.jpg.498f025aa2fc4842236b4dbba6a06e17.jpg 

Gotcha I will have to doo some research. Loving the old pictures though thanks for sharing history!

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Would sure be nice to know what happened to up set those harvesters. My dad used a John Deere 36 b until 1980. Holt had first built that design back in the late 20's,and as Cat sold there harvester or combine business to JD in the 30's.

Dad tried to cut with the header up hill but tipping had nothing to do with that.When leveled all the way over with header down hill the left end of the augers for clean grain and the returns are under the separator where only a inch or 2 from touching the dirt . So it didn't take much of a rock to hit the auger trough and  bend it and soon had a whole to run the crop back on the ground. Was not unheard of bend things enough to stop the elevator up.

There were a lot of IH 51 hillside machines around and they leveled on a steeper hill than any of the other from what I was told.But I was never around any but the JD machines, until the self propelled ones. 

 

I forgot about the wood chain tighteners until I read it again,but AC used some on the Gleaner MH2's that were made in the early 80's. I have made some myself from limbs off blue oaks locally. They are the slowest growing ones and live on the least water and are the toughest  of the local verity's.Most never get over 18 trunks and that took 200 years I would guess. I was just hoping to get by for a few hours and they have lasted for several years of us.  

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They didn't run cattle b/c its ALL hills there!  No water for the gals either on them ;)

 

I'm wondering if Greg is ok?  Should call my 2 cousins who live in Pullman.  See if they know anything. 

Gary, it runs 10 days min.  Dr told me it's the flu...not the stomach flu but the everything else flu.  I ended up with bronchitis from it.

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On 2/26/2017 at 7:18 PM, Howard_P said:

The Autowagon has to be a 1909 since that was the first year for them and the 1910 model got a small hood with a radiator or fuel tank.   Autobuggies only were built in 1907 and 08.  That bridge is in Spencerville, Indiana and was recently rebuilt after a semi ignored the height signs and tried to drive through it because his GPS said he could rather than using the new bridge nearby.   I think the driver spent 6 months in jail for that trick.  There are now steel beams mounted over the approaches to the bridge to prevent another occurrence.  That was an IH photo so I suspect this Navistar-owned Autowagon now at the National Auto & Truck Museum of the US in Auburn, IN is the same one.

The semi would be a K-10, a KB would have chrome trim wrapping around the nose of the hood.

IH Autowagon-1909.jpg

Sorry about the bad date guess, on the AutoWagon, Howard_P, and thanks for straightening me out. Now, I know the AutoBuggy came out in 1907 and the AutoWagon in 1909. The front on the 1910 is a cover over the fuel tank, like the one below on Roger's 1912 AutoWagon.

58b7b44ee0e89_MeinRogers1912IHCAutowagonGary.jpg.5cda29875cc23aff8401941ca322c18e.jpg

The water cooled (radiator) didn't come out until 1912. The radiator front trucks like this one of Wendell Kelch's are taller. Gary;)

58b7b4da32597_WendellKelchin1912AutowagonatNTA2015.thumb.jpg.accb2f0d25b1f16ea432f2184895c6b2.jpg

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3 hours ago, Howard_P said:

Here's a addition to the New York City steam locos I just found.  Apparently they also had to provide a flagman to clear the way who did so on horseback.

New York City Switching 2.JPG

Howard_P, I guess this Montana farm boy grew up too far away from the big city to know how their railroads operated in the city. That's interesting they boxed in the locomotives to make them more generic looking and used horses to settle other horses and people like shown in your photo. That all makes sense. Back in the 1880's, as this JI Case steam traction engine in Montana had a horse on the front, the horse likely steered the engine as well. However, they were required in some jurisdictions to have a horse in the lead, to settle down oncoming horses.

58b8f57b3209e_1883JICasehorsesteeredsteamtractionengine.jpg.d1ad122909aa84440ab539e917e27e89.jpg

As a matter of fact, a facebook friend has bought and is restoring this exact 1881 Russel & Company steam engine, below. The photo shows the engine being delivered to its original owner! Horse steered too. Gary;)

58b8f69b0a927_Russell13hphorsesteeringtractionenginebeingdeliverednewin1881TWDiehl-.jpg.30c7acc3922f818368032d07959aeb35.jpg

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Howard_P, this photo came along on Facebook. Is this perhaps a D-10? And what were the actual years the D-line was built? I rode a lot of miles in my dad's old D-30. Well, maybe not so many "miles" but lots, and lots of hours in the harvest field.

58b9f1c4dcdb7_D-lineInternationalHarvesterIHTruckLineadGaryW.thumb.jpg.bdc826318dd5a99d1bcf47fa7370ecd3.jpg

And what would you tag this apparent two ton IH truck??

58b9f219c5905_IHCDserieslikely30or40GaryWred.thumb.jpg.70b241829babe6413791927c41ee35dc.jpg

58b9f2519541a_DseriesIHCtruckspickupsonassemblyline.jpg.3562e52ad056f6819624072febdad8bc.jpg

58b9f25b54f4f_1936DseriesIHCtruckspickups.jpg.ddfeb5060d1b70811d337604ae300f9e.jpg

Dad and his brothers had one of these pickups during WWII that I remember riding in. What was their designation? The same designation the USPO gave them? Thanks for teaching me and any others who don't know! Gary;)

58b9f2bb98c16_1938InternationalHarvesterIHD-2Pickuppostagestampfor2016.jpg.ec006fbde88cccd6e2e7ccb74ecf947c.jpg

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D-Series models were built from April 1937 thru 1940 with some models continuing into 1941 along with K models that were being introduced.

I can say that the one in the ad is not a D-10--mostly because IH did not use the sequential numbering that started with the K-series for the D-series. If that were a K, a K-10 would seem likely.  D-series models were the D-2, 5, 15, 29 & 30 from Springfield, D-35, 39, 40, 50 and 60 from Fort Wayne, plus some variations on these (No, I do not know the logic behind this system). There are no distinct differences to to identify a particular model, but it seems likely the ad would be a D-50 or 60.  The D-35 was rated at 1 1/2 to 2 tons and the D-40 at 2 to 3 tons so one of those is likely the second photo.

The pickup on the line is a D-2 Half Ton.  Note that there was not a D-1 in the lineup.  This was because the first IH pickup was the 1933 D-1 that was built for IH by Willys.  The design was then purchased by IH and reworked into the C-series that followed.  The D-1 model designation was not reused again in 1937 to avoid any confusion.  There is a heavier model on the line in the background in the second photo, probably a D-30 due to the cast wheel that can be seen.

I love those assembly line photos.  I remember old-timers talking about the Springfield plant, which started as the Champion Reaper plant in the 1850s before IH was formed, having a dirt floor, but this is the first time I've seen proof of that.  I'd think the dirt was covered before the new plant was built in 1964, but that's an interesting photo.

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After my neighbor gave me the old Towner offset (pictured aways back)--------it rekindled my interest in the history of Towner.  According to "Google"------------Towner was in business from 1915--1986 in Santa Ana, California;  starting out as a blacksmith----repairing farm equipment, automobile springs, and later manufacturing farm equipment and moving to a new location in Santa Ana.   I did not realize that Santa Ana in now within the Los Angeles sprawl until looking it up on the map. 

Apparently Towner was a "hands on" man----------------having started as a blacksmith.

Here are a couple of pictures from his early days-----------maybe some of ya'll can fill in on the model of the ambulance, and the road construction tractor.   (notes on picture say road construction was with California Highway Commission------wonder who all is driving on that old road today???)

58bc6a198aeae_TownerMfgCo._earlypicture.JPG.3a4b7acc94efd359669fe699554c1c1b.JPG

 

58bc6a448a1c9_Towner_earlyroadconstruction.JPG.573c373480ff28f771766d117a00eebd.JPG

 

DD

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And--------------------in following my pride and history of being a Deplorable (having voted for Trump and having taken on the project of bringing the old Towner disc back to life;  amongst a lifetime of other deplorable things);-------------I bought the boys a "deplorable" CASE disc at a local auction sale this week for working their hunting ground food plots. 

This is a CASE model K-23 disc------------actually manufactured by AMCO in Yazoo City, Mississippi as an AMCO model F-12.  Ironically------there was an identical AMCO model F-12 disc in near identical condition sitting several items up line from the CASE.  I had looked these over pretty close and determined that I would take either one at $1,000 or less.  Bidding on the AMCO ran up to $1,700 (I figured I was out of the running----------but thought the CASE just might not bring as much).   Sure enough--------I bought the deplorable old CASE for $700.   Damm-----------it feels good to be a deplorable;  felt so good, that I rode a mile up the road and pulled the deplorable disc home with our deplorable 2090 CASE tractor.   

Disc needs some work on the pivot pins on the wheel carriage------------and a little odd and end patch work (as did the AMCO;--------the CASE actually had slightly better blades).  I could go to the field right now.   This model AMCO/CASE had a light duty frame/undercarriage------but good quality axles and bearings.  We will most likely pull the wings off and just use the base unit--------------take some load off of the wheel carriage;---------and have lots of parts left over.  Ought to last the boys a long time doing the small food plot work.

 

58bc6d760c0b6_Casedisc2090_atshop.JPG.437b4274a6e0982dbd12915dce4193ef.JPG

 

 

No doubt-------------the orange paint and CASE brand scared alot of the bidders off (with a direct comparison to the AMCO that sold).   There were some I-H 485's and 490's sitting all around it with completely worn out blades bringing $2,500---$2,700.  

edit:  I never knew CASE was so deplorable until reading some of the posts in the Case/I-H merger discussion.  I always liked the eagle and globe; and was extremely proud of the eagle/globe/anchor of the USMC.

*********

Not but a couple of I-H tractors in sale--------------and I had to leave before they sold.  There was what appeared to be a pretty decent Case-IH model 595 (?) manure spreader that sold that I later saw on a truck headed toward Arkansas. Manure spreaders are a rare item down in these parts.

************

In the far distance you can see the remnants of the old International model 125 SP combine that I cut down back in the 60's and converted to a lift pole tractor.   Hasn't run in years---------sorry to say, my shop yard looks like a junk yard (it really is deplorable)!!!!:o;)

 

Delta Dirt   (Avon  Ms  38723)

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18 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

And--------------------in following my pride and history of being a Deplorable (having voted for Trump and having taken on the project of bringing the old Towner disc back to life;  amongst a lifetime of other deplorable things);-------------I bought the boys a "deplorable" CASE disc at a local auction sale this week for working their hunting ground food plots. 

This is a CASE model K-23 disc-

 

 

Delta Dirt   (Avon  Ms  38723)

Anson, after 36 years  and over 7000 hours of reliable service it is a little scary to hear how bad those 2090 tractors are :-) Your disk looks good but I wonder if it might be a bit heavy for the 2090, especially with single wheels on the tractor. Hard to say as there are different weights. I have a pic somewhere of me pulling a heavy breaking disk with my 2090 I'll try to find. I think it was about a 14 foot and it had a little extra weight added with a stack of old grader blades bolted to the frame. It would cut anything but I had to be pretty careful and ready to lift when the tractor started to slip. Diff lock helps but with singles you don't spin much before going  down. 

Here is what my deplorable old 2090 and me were busy with last week. 

 

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