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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy
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So, a little off topic but I thought of you when I saw this today.  I spotted this watch fob in an antique mall while out of town for work (still got pocket watches on my mind) and remembered your family name from being mentioned. I'm sure they weren't in the concrete business but still a match I think? 

B4851973-FF2C-4EC0-87D2-21C05B3F7DAD_zps

It was $85 

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On 2/20/2017 at 10:32 AM, Old Binder Guy said:

A couple of photos of a Nilson gas tractor pulling two McCormick-Binders that have "automatic shocker" attachments (that'd be "stooker" for our Canadian friends). These are in central Montana. Gary;)

58ab27d0bd852_Agr-162000.2304WilsontractorpullingbinderscentralMontanared.thumb.jpg.ca2b594a2145461ab514d01606a710f3.jpg

58ab27c708bbc_Agr-202000WilsontractorMcCormickbindersred.thumb.jpg.14a708e1cc7e19b69bf950e4f7a74446.jpg

If any of you receive Farm Collector magazine, you may have ran across Sam Moore who writes articles for them. He's on a site on Facebook (and is my friend there) in which I'd also posted the two above photos of a Wilson tractor pulling McCormick binders in central Montana. I noticed the contraption on the binders, but didn't realize until I posted them on Facebook that those are "McCormick Deering Grain Shockers." I'd bumped into them someplace before, so kind of knew what they were and were for. It makes me wonder how dependable and effective these "shockers" are? I've never seen on in person. Sam Moore had this and posted it. So I had to come here and post Sam's literature here for my friends here!

58acf2cca3535_McCormick-DeeringGrainShockerforbindersSamMoorered.thumb.jpg.ebf0fd99ed62f7286623bbb9f22c9efa.jpg

And, sledgehammer, that is one neat watch fob. My Grandpa spelled his name up until the mid-1890's as "Jäger" then for a very short time, spelled it as on your watch fob; "Jaeger." He had been told if he dropped the umlaut and added an "e" that'd do the job. But, they kept on calling grandpa, "J-ger" and he didn't like that, so he changed the J to Y. Gary;)

 

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4 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

My wife and I both have the crud right now. I'm not real wordy, but I sure liked this photo taken inside an International Harvester dealership about 1963 or 64. I'm going by the Scout with roll up windows. Gary;)

58acc1bc72fa8_Farmall656IHCubCadetsatdealershipJordanKonkol.thumb.jpg.5a82cd0cec5d707ed62f22eaf88e436b.jpg

Not meant to be picky but you are a little bit early. That picture is from 1965 or early 1966 as it looks to be wintertime in the background. I still think the white face 656 had some of the best styling IH ever had.

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looking at the colors, on that 656 would be a good example of what parts are painted what colors. it looks to me like the 3  hub cap bolts are left unpainted (cadmium plated) were the hubs off when it went to paint booth? neat photo, wonder why there are there 3 different grill style (year) cadets on floor.

 

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5 hours ago, Fred B said:

looking at the colors, on that 656 would be a good example of what parts are painted what colors. it looks to me like the 3  hub cap bolts are left unpainted (cadmium plated) were the hubs off when it went to paint booth? neat photo, wonder why there are there 3 different grill style (year) cadets on floor.

 

Rear tires are on backwards too.

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I thought I'd check and see if this site was still here. I shaved Sunday morning about 7:AM and haven't been out of my "jammies" other than to shower since, and haven't shaven since. The "crud" thundered through our house. Sharon has had it a week and sound terrible still. I was telling her yesterday, I sort of look like "Brad Pitt" with my whiskers. But they are white enough, we decided I look more like Wolf Blitzer. Gary;)

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Todd, It's going through Helena like nobody's business. And on Facebook, it seems everyone there has it as well.

This stuff was on Facebook, as there is a group there getting ready for the 175th Anniversary of JI Case. I am posting these for old friend Tom Railsback or Tubacase47. He plays Tuba, has several dozen of them and loves bands. This was the JI Case Threshing Machine Company's band, on a street car.

58b0a234934e0_JICaseThreshingMachineCompanysbandinstreetcarred.jpg.3d6e00bdb550b75465e83974b01e5efc.jpg

Also Case, is this cross motor tractor pulling the 100,000th Case threshing machine in (I would assume?) Racine, Wisconsin.

58b0a23f65125_Casecrossmotortractorpulling100000ththreshingmachineintown.thumb.jpg.dac9428399d93962498b090bfb9ff5d3.jpg

And this Case photo of a combine pulled by horses in Oregon reminded me of the photos Greg Druffel (Palouse) used to produce on this thread, early on. Gary;)

58b0a246e0a69_ACasehillsidecombinebeingpulledbyhorsesin1929Oregonwheatfields.jpg.a66978e497fd342c7f2732100c646734.jpg 

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Gary, the band photo is something I have been looking for for years; I always suspected that Case had a company band like most other corporations of that era.

The tractor pulling the separator is a 15-27 and the photo was shot in front of Case headquarters at 700 State Street in Racine, WI.

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Re-incarnated Towner model D 36 offset disc shows up at my shop today-----------retrieved from woods by my neighbor and delivered to my shop.  And------it's my color (rusty/dusty).:o     Old drag style with no hydraulics----------heavy duty 8 ft cutting width with 24" blades (as are now) on 12" spacing.  Been sitting for 30--40 yrs---------but all bearings had grease and rolled/turned free.  Looks to be a real heavy cutter----plan on using on some brushy tail ditches and brushy corners growing up where 12 row equipment can't get into.  Also in food plots-----duck hole of my nephew's WRP acreage.

Planning on mounting a hydraulic cylinder for changing the cutting angle.   Needs the sliding bar changed out (bent)------but I've got an old 20 ft lighter Towner with the same slide bar on it that will be good for parts.  Wheel carriage sure would be nice------------but the price is right;  so no complaints.;)

I have been familiar with Towner since I was a kid-----------have pulled the old 20 ft Towner over a many an acre;  mostly behind the TD-14  (more of a finishing disc than the 8 ft pictured).   Anybody-------------familiar with this model D 36????

58b0faf255f5c_TownerdiscD36rearview.JPG.3de1cb4e20333770c2fac0b39d3cc0c6.JPG

 

58b0fb54d7f22_TownerdiscD36serialtag.JPG.be64f9887e5faaadb0c85eddf7f7b37f.JPG

 

That's my neighbor's J-D--------------I will be pulling behind our 2090 Case;  believe it will be a full load based on cutting load behind the J-D.  Will definitely need to be able to control cutting angle from the tractor seat.

My current neighbor had purchased a small farm tract from another neigbor's widow when the husband died several years ago-------the old disc and other equipment had been sitting in the woodline for years.  I had mentioned that I was looking for a small offset to work on some of these small rough spots.  We think the previous owner had pulled this behind a TD-14 (an IH tractror on a Mississippi farm!!!!

Towner is based in California-----------appears to still be in business???

 

continued next post-----

 

DD

 

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Front view----------the blades measure 24";  musta been 26" when it was new???   And----you can see the bent slide bar that controls the angle of cut (also tends to act as a stabilizer bar to take some of the twisting stress off of the mid-pivot point).  

 

58b0fd53bc9b2_TownerdiscD36frontview.JPG.986f7840431c79f77efddc41e1958794.JPG

 

And--------------the old 20 ft parts department with the straight 3" x 1-1/4" slide bar.  Axle, frame, etc. not as heavy as the 8 ft unit.   This old disc was a real good finishing disc in dry conditions---------but did not like damp, sticky gumbo; --------and a real headache for moving around.    

 

58b0fe041fbc7_Townerdisc20ftinweeds.JPG.e498954e72ff52763d4626a48453e317.JPG

 

Am looking forward for a little welding and sledgehammer work-------------will be much better on a project like this than working on a 100 yr old pocket watch!!!!!!!!:o:D

 

DD

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Sidehill harvester(combines were harvesters in local lingo) was about what my grandpa would of had at that time as well. No pictures of that time that I have seen. In 35 he bought a Cat 35 diesel,and Cat sent a photographer around to take pictures. My uncle got the tractor and pictures,and we had some photo copies but seem to have disappeared again. 

As I don't see a grain tank the 2 men on left must be sacking the grain. There would be a slide that would hold 5 to maybe 10 sacks. They where tough back then would fill wheat sacks to 120 to 140 pounds depending on the wheat. The man on the right was header tender,and the last ran the leveling and watched the separator was doing a good job,and maybe used the stick by his right hand to give incoming crop a little push into separator if it  bunched up.  It could also be that one is the teamster since no dust in the air they are probably stop for the photo op. In witch case header tender would run leveler as well. From the stories I have heard of  grandpa may be why there are no photos,you only stopped if it was broke.

 

 

 

Yes DD have the same disc . We always had it behind a D6 both 3 and 6 cylinder models. The  Red farmer next door was a pardner with dad on that disc and he put it behind a TD14. I believe for best job the blades should be 32 or even 36 inch. Despite the weight the last pastured when wet ground I worked I could not get the penetration I wanted.  End up doing 2 passes with a 9 inch spaced disc was faster and a little better. The  one here is in need of new bearings as well as discs are under 24 so like yours it sits under a tree.

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Ray- - -

Thanks for the quick reply.

Figured some of you California boys would be familiar with Towner.  Based on the trial run behind the larger J- D- - - - - - - - it will get enuff penetration to throw a load on my 2090 Case.  (won't be using it but on small, corners/patches etc)

Have you ever changed any bearings out??  Are these ball or roller bearings- - - - or possibly cast iron bushings???  They would definitely be designed for slower speeds than todays discs.

Do you have any idea on the age of yours and the model pictured.  My dad bought the lighter duty 20 ft in the late 40's- - - - so it's in the 65+ yr age range.  They both have simlar slide action manual angle adjustment mechanisms.

Is Towner still open for business??? 

DD

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Anson, My father in-law used to have an 8' IH disk that looked (from my memory) just like yours. He pulled it behind his WD-6, and later WD-9. I can't find any photos of it. I think it might be behind the pair of wheels (below, right, from the elevator on the highway) he used to move his drills. I wonder if Towner built them for IH at that time?

58b1bc06e8636_R-120plowelevator3-1973red.jpg.076c17cd58bef9ebab2ab9b8e5cc3d52.jpg

We used to have this (pathetic photo) IH 12' hydraulic offset disk. I pulled it a lot over the years. Especially after breaking up hay land. It chewed up clumps well. But my old WD-9 (I'm sitting on the disk hitch) with the MacDonald cab was an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm!

58b1b95b460c2_WD-9IHoffsetdisk.jpg.95316b3b0446710e6f771cba9e2e55e6.jpg

And I pulled an Edwards 32' rod weeder, as well as an IH 490 disk, behind the 4568. I can't believe I never got a photo of either of those implements behind that tractor. This is from the internet, but it is just like the one I had, except for the wheel color. My wheels were "IH white."

58b1baee79e61_InternationalHarvester490Disk.jpg.f15bd28dba6bc65f5e69b6b852127ac7.jpg

Ray54, This is not a Holt sidehill combined harvester, but just a "flatlander" type. I posted this just to show the sacking slide you spoke of. Gary;)

25 hp Reeves pulling Holt combined harvester central Montana rear red.jpg

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In searching on Google- - - - - a parts site came up (selling Towner parts) stating that Towner was no longer in business.

In scratching around on the old disc it appears that it has the cast bearing "spools".  I can remember seeing older disc with wooden "spools/bushings"- - - - oddly enough they ran a long time with plenty of grease.   Maybe the Professor has a couple hanging on the "WALL of YESTERDAY"???

Lots of changes in in products and companies thru the years- - - - - and a lot of the mainline company implements were manufactured by "shortline" companies.

DD

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I'm still under the weather with the crud, Day 6. My wife is slowly improving and she just completed day 10. Two to three weeks are common for it here in Helena, so we've heard. Here's just some IHC stuff I found on Facebook. I liked this photo of a lever lift cultivator on this Farmall F-12.

58b385651eef4_FarmallF-12IHCwithmountedcultivatorfrontrubber.jpg.ee13f2ab922a68e5a69e67551240cc6a.jpg

This is a very early IHC Autowagon, emerging from a covered bridge near "Spencerville!" I'm going to guess 1908, Roger??

58b385862e319_Spencervillecoveredbridgewithca1907IHCAutoWagon.thumb.jpg.f54f8f8a1a2b82ce4fd7646b12271f6e.jpg

I knew nothing about a "Model G" IHC "shovelnose" truck, but I'm sure Roger knows something about this big old girl?

58b3857066163_ModelGIHCTruckwithhardrubbertireshaulinglogsGaryW.thumb.jpg.95e08841530d7680d13b61fd4a3d13d4.jpg

This is a C Model IHC Truck ca 1935, that delivered Jersey Gold Milk at Great Falls, Montana.

58b385505e10e_GreatFallsJerseyGoldDairyIHCCmodeldeliverytruckBarbaraGilcrist_edited-1.jpg.7a55963b055fdfa2fba3069942232201.jpg

And last, but not least, is this approximate K-10 or KB-10? It's climbing a highway up the rimrocks at Billings. I'm assuming this is the 27th street/Airport Road the way it must have looked back then? Gary;)

58b3853fa3b3b_AboutKB-10IHclimbinghillatBillingsMontana.jpg.ca66a1edc456b7c92fe4ed0e51f48562.jpg

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Hadn't thought about the wooden slide chain tensioners TwoStep.  Wonder what type of wood was used- - - - had to be hard.

 Over weekend been working on mounting a hydraulic cylinder for angle adjustment on the old disc.  Will be all trial an error on the mount- - - - gotta create lots of movement going to full angle position.  I have always enjoyed the torch, welder, and a big hammer.

Sure beats the he!! out of working on the computer.  Now- - - - - - I gotta see if I can get up tomorrow!!

DD

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The Autowagon has to be a 1909 since that was the first year for them and the 1910 model got a small hood with a radiator or fuel tank.   Autobuggies only were built in 1907 and 08.  That bridge is in Spencerville, Indiana and was recently rebuilt after a semi ignored the height signs and tried to drive through it because his GPS said he could rather than using the new bridge nearby.   I think the driver spent 6 months in jail for that trick.  There are now steel beams mounted over the approaches to the bridge to prevent another occurrence.  That was an IH photo so I suspect this Navistar-owned Autowagon now at the National Auto & Truck Museum of the US in Auburn, IN is the same one.

The semi would be a K-10, a KB would have chrome trim wrapping around the nose of the hood.

IH Autowagon-1909.jpg

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