Jump to content

IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

Recommended Posts

Ralph, I missed your post, sandwiched between mine, last night. Sorry. I don't know why a twist would hurt the splice, as they barely touch, if at all? I wasn't trying to run the saw the correct direction. I ran the belt without a twist at first, but it was flopping all over the place, so I put the twist in. I wasn't sawing anything with the saw, just "exercising" the belt with an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm, is all! Gary

IH Farmall M Toot, hard red rubber belt 10-20-16 red.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I sure don't know much. Roger called today. He's been busier than a "one arm paper hanger" (Not politically correct, I know.) They're putting Big Four tractors together at a friend's place.

I stole some photos from Facebook again. This first one is a 1938 IHC Farmall 2-F which never made the cut, to production.

IHC Farmall 2-F experimental styled tractor Chuck Foland.jpg

Kind of a neat photo of a W-30 McCormick Standard pulling an IHC manure spreader. Probably spreading political promises?

IHC McCormick-Deering W-30 pulling an IHC manure spreader.jpg

 A neat old original "work clothes" Duckbill F-20 ( I'm pretty sure it isn'a a F-30? The gas tank doesn't look that tall?)

IHC Duckbill Farmall F-20 Regular.jpgAnd I had to post a picture of the Farmall F-12 in Mike's shed for the winter. Between the 1925 Model TT Truck I Annie, and beside his and Randy's Reeves steam engine. Johnny (the F-12) is an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm, you know! Gary;)

IHC F-12 & 1925 Model TT in shed 10-3-16 red_edited-1.jpg

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, Old Binder Guy said:

I sure don't know much. Roger called today. He's been busier than a "one arm paper hanger" (Not politically correct, I know.) They're putting Big Four tractors together at a friend's place.

I stole some photos from Facebook again. This first one is a 1938 IHC Farmall 2-F which never made the cut, to production.

IHC Farmall 2-F experimental styled tractor Chuck Foland.jpg

Kind of a neat photo of a W-30 McCormick Standard pulling an IHC manure spreader. Probably spreading political promises?

IHC McCormick-Deering W-30 pulling an IHC manure spreader.jpg

 A neat old original "work clothes" Duckbill F-20 ( I'm pretty sure it isn'a a F-30? The gas tank doesn't look that tall?)

IHC Duckbill Farmall F-20 Regular.jpgAnd I had to post a picture of the Farmall F-12 in Mike's shed for the winter. Between the 1925 Model TT Truck I Annie, and beside his and Randy's Reeves steam engine. Johnny (the F-12) is an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm, you know! Gary;)

IHC F-12 & 1925 Model TT in shed 10-3-16 red_edited-1.jpg

 

Gary 

Lookingat the top two bolts on the air cleaner mounts they are the same height.  On the F30 the one is higher than the F20. So you are correct that it's a 20

Tim 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for that information, Tim! For an old duffer like me to have grown up with our farm still haying with Regulars and F-20's (we never had a F-30), I should know more about them than I do. Of course, I know some of the young guys who've bought them and restored them, that's how you find out the real differences and get to know each bolt and part on a personal basis. I know from restoring my Model T Coupe, I had every bolt and some rivets out of it and put it all back together myself. While I might go to Henry's repair manual to check on adjustments, etc., I pretty much have anything else committed to memory and don't need that book for that! Gary;)

1926 Model T Coupe engine left side 7-13-16.jpg

1926 Model T Coupe engine right side 7-13-16.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Several 15 hp Case steam engines have shown up in various forums. They kind are special to me. This one is of a water well drilling outfit in Canada. The engine is furnishing steam for the vertical engine mounted on the drilling rig.15 hp Case furnishing steam for a well drilling outfit Onkel GWill DK_edited-1.jpg

This is a closeup they furnished of the 15 hp Case and the rig's engine.

15 hp Case powering upright engine on well drilling outfit Onkel G_edited-1.jpg

This is a 15 hp Case powering what I believe is a threshing machine and the "straw" or whatever that fodder is, is going into the hay loft of the barn.

15 hp Case on belt near Wausau, Nebraska, Jeanne Young crop_edited-1.jpg

This one is an early 15 hp Case with a steerable tender following, in Troy, Missouri. I don't know what those guys are doing behind the tender.

15 hp Case with Full canopy in Troy Missouri, Dan H, grandpa's hardwar in distance red.jpg

Off of the subject of a 15 hp Case, is this Farmall H pulling a hay rack where they're putting hay bales into a barn in the 1940's or 50's. This isn't on a Montana Farm...  Gary;)

Putting hay bales in the barn in 1940's, IH Farmall H, Austen Schoof.jpg

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know anything tonight. Art, You could be correct, but I don't know if they had a weight sled fastened or not, to that 15 hp Case?

I've never seen this type of unusual steel wheel spikes before, as shown on this  Farmall F-12.

IHC Farmall F-12 & road grader with unusual spikes.jpg

And I've heard many times about the Prony brake, but never knew how it got its name. This was Gaspard de Prony's brake at the 1910 Winnipeg trials. It shows an early IHC tractor, Roger may know what, belted to the brake there. I notice the brake to the left shows it is property of Avery Co. at Peoria, Illinois. Gary;)

Gaspard de Prony's brake at Winnipeg in 1910 with IHC tractor belted red.jpg

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I sure don't know much anymore, it seems. I did stop at a junk shop this morning on the way to Silver Creek. They'd gotten a couple of barrels of shovels, hoes, rakes, ice scrapers, you name it. I couldn't believe the price. .75 cents each. So I wasted $6, but then I forgave myself, as I've spent that much on a cheeseburger, fries and a drink.

Shovels, rakes, hoe & Princess 10-28-16 red.jpg

They did say they belonged to a "hoarder" and it was from his estate. I'm not sure what a hoarder is, but I don't ever want to become one. It sounded nasty, when they said the word.

Shovels, rakes, hoe $6 ReStore 10-28-16 red-.jpg

So I added some of the real old ones to my hanging pile in Mike's shed. Hey! That appears to be an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm parked under them? Gary;)

Shovels, etc hanging in shed, Farmall M Toot 10-28-16 red.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nephew Randy, Mike's Reeves steam engine partner, had Mike haul his pretty little 1945 Farmall A, "Aimee" out to Mike's shop this afternoon. I don't know what their arrangement is, but Randy is having some serious back surgery Friday, so I know this is for the winter at least.  

Mike, Aimee IH Farmall A & Randy 10-30-16 red.jpg

IH Farmall Aimee in Mike's shop 10-30-16 red.jpg

So, I guess now Aimee is an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm? Gary;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, M Diesel said:

Ya got a lot of stuff there OBG. I see the blower and blade made the front line. :rolleyes:

The A is a beaut for sure. Might trade off my Cub for a Super someday.

M Diesel, 

We kind of figured that before too many moons, winter might show up. We just wanted to be ready. 

The first tractor, implement or thing I ever drove was a Farmall Cub. 6-years old, I was sent to get the milk cows after I got home from school. 1/2-3/4 of a mile was the usual trip, depending where I intercepted them. When I was 9, I went to the hay field with the Cub and mowed hay with the big guys, their Farmall M's and their belly pump hydraulics. I had the lever. Then Dad bought a Farmall Super A when I was about 10 or 11? I got to mow one season with it and it's hydraulics. Then he and his brothers decided they needed a tractor (and operator) to pull side delivery rakes for making bales. We'd done much loose hay up to that point, but still did a good share of loose hay at this time. I hated raking. But for the next few years, THAT was my haying job, besides being on the bale stack.

In 1956, during haying season, a cousin was going to hay a huge field for his cousin, on his mother's side. I was told I'd be mowing AND raking with the Farmall Super A. I found a half minute or less of glee in that 5 days I worked in that huge hay field. I got paid nothing. But, on one of the last days I worked raking in that field was a Saturday. I'd finished raking the field, but needed to make a back swath around the outside of the field. As I was raking along, I looked back and saw a red and white 1956 Ford Fairlane Fordor coming down the highway that I was raking next to. It was Lynn, Cleo and Sharon Simpson. I stood up and waved my fool hands off. Seven years later, I ended up marrying Sharon, which happened also, about 53-1/2 years ago. Since I don't have a photo of that 1956 Ford, I'm putting a picture on here drawn by my friend Don Greytak, of Havre, Montana. It is the vehicle at the right with the mama bear begging; for the kids who don't know what a 1956 Ford looked like. Gary;)

Don Greytak, Don't Feed the Bears, Jammer bus, 1956 Ford Fairlane etc..jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Farmall Kid (son Mike) took today off from work and after he bought his Paw breakfast at the Early Bird Cafe, we did several jobs around his shop, in preparation for winter. We cleared out a bunch of things behind our "table", where some talk, some eating and some sittings takes place occasionally. He moved Aimee back there for the winter, and we covered her up, so she doesn't get very dusty over the winter.  Then we moved some of the things back, and other things to other places. Mike backed in into here in this picture.

Mike & Aimee back into parking spot 11-2-16 red.jpg

This is some of the stuff we moved back around it, as we couldn't give up all of the space to an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm.

Aimee parked in shop, stuff back in place 11-2-16 red.jpg

I had a friend give me this tool. I don't know if it is for doing cedar shakes or what? He didn't know either, but knew I'd hang it on the wall!  Gary;)

Tomohawk tool from friend Corky, 11-2-16 red.jpg

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting tool you just posted Professor---------but I can't help with the indenity.   I do have a couple of wood shake shingles (most likely heart pine) dating back to my great, great, great (however great ?) grandfather's log cabin which was originally built in 1801 in south Mississippi.  Don't know that these shingles date back that far-----------more than likely they had been replaced at sometime and were "take offs".   The cabin still stands-----------and has been restored and is in very sound condition.   I've got pictures----but I believe they were taken prior to the digital world with my old 35mm SLR camera and I would have to find them to scan.

Be interesting if someone can shed some light on your new wall hanger.

 

**************

Ran across the below pic of me on my old TD-14 pushing dirt in the rice field in 1980.  May have posted this before in years gone by--------------still have the TD-14, but she ain't running these days.  She and I grew up together---------both manufactured in 1943.  Bucyrus angle blade rolls the dirt----------usually started the push in 2nd with sometimes a quick downshift to 1st as the load increased.   Always felt like I could move more dirt and leave a smoother cut with the angle blade.   Would usually push on a "cross hatch pattern" at approximately 45 degree angles" where I kept cutting and picking up the spill over all at the same time.   Was on a short push--------pushing off a sizeable "knot" into a low depression.  That old tractor was good to my dad------------and good to me;  lots of ag work in addition to lots of dozer work.

 

TD-14  rice field 1980_1.jpg

 

And----------that is not an IH Tractor on a Montana farm;  but is an IH Tractor on a Mississippi farm pushing on some Delta Dirt that most likely washed off down this way via the Missouri and then down the Mississippi Rivers until is settled out where I found it and moved it a little more!!!!!!!;)

 

Delta Dirt  Avon  Ms  38723

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's interesting that TD-14 you have, Anson. We three were built in a good year, even if the country was at war. It's a good thing it's not setting and rusting at Silver Creek, as I'd have to see if I couldn't do something about that, and I'm too darn old to be doing something like that! That's a neat, keeper photo too. None of ours had ROPS on them.

We had three TD's on our farm in my lifetime with dozers. This TD-9 was the first. They had an RD-4 Caterpillar before I was born. It was traded on this TD-9. When the brothers divided up Grandpa's estate in ca. 1947, my dad ended up with this TD-9. It had a dozer for it, but not mounted in this photo of it pulling their Rumely Combine about 1948.

TD-9, Rumely & K-5 sharp red.jpg

Now, few of you people will understand my dad doing this. The TD-9 was underpowered for his desires, so he traded it (down) for this TD-40 with Holt dozer about 1950. Mike's engine partner, Randy, (Aimee owner) is sitting on the crawler at the farm.

Randy on TD-40 TracTracTor dozer2.jpg

We (dad and I) traded the one above for the TD-18A I farmed with. I missed having a dozer outfit in later years, so I purchased this TD-18A 181 Series with an angle Bucyrus-Erie (IH welded onto the upper front plate of the dozer) dozer about 1975. That's son, Farmall Kid and daughter Michaelle on it. I about wore it out in the winter of 1978. That winter was real hard on it. I got a lot of use out of this old girl too. I guess these three units were all IH Tractors on a Montana Farm too? Gary;)

TD-18A 181 MIke & Shell dozer IH.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This was the RD-4 Caterpillar they had on the farm before I showed up. Uncle Audie is operating it, his son Alvin on his lap and my 5-year older brother Bill (may they all rest in peace) is riding, in the barnyard. Dad said they were doing some creek work with it and got it stuck. They had to leave it overnight, and finally retrieved it from Beaver Creek the next day. He said sand and silt got into the rollers, and it completely ate out the rollers.

RD-4, Audie, Alvin, Billy Joe+.jpg

They traded the RD-4 Caterpillar for the TD-9 Dad ended up with. This is a poor photo of uncle Audie moving a loose haystack with it in winter. 

IH TD-9  moving haystack at Lewistown farm-.jpg

And of course, Dad traded the above TD-9 for the below TD-40 with the Holt dozer. This photo has circulated around the world, the internet, and several other forums. Dad got it stuck straightening out Beaver Creek, and it took our two other (at that time) TD-40 TracTracTors to pull it out. Gary:o

And again, all but the RD-4, were IH Tractors on a Montana Farm.

Three 3 TD-40's stuck in Beaver Creek.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Professor----

Don't think my brush guard ("headache rack") qualifies as a ROPS.

It would keep limbs and brush away from my head though.  I built it up after an oak limb whiplashed over the blade and danm near took my head off while pushing on a fallen tree out behind the shop in the spring of 1973.  The limb sheared the muffler off at its mount to the exhaust manifold---------with limb and hot muffler striking my forehead.  Didn't knock me out---------but I ended up with a number of stitches and walked around with two black eyes for a week or so afterward.

Beware of guys named Oak----------especially if they have bark for skin!!!!!!:wacko:;)

Be a snow bird and come on down for the winter and get this old girl back to purring (and I will let you clean up and organize my shop while you are here)!!!.   Believe I may have a cracked head from running hot----my son Reb and one of his high school friends took it over behind the Levee one afternoon to push out hunting roads and ran it hot after the radiator got stopped up with leaves.   They let it cool down and brought it in to the shop-------it was running when I tracked it to where it is parked under the shed.   After setting through the winter months--------the engine would not turn over.   Coolant had drained down out of radiator----------and I drained off coolant from bottom of crankcase (bad omen);  So-------at a minimum, I figure the head needs to come off.  

Needless to say, even though you and I are the same age (as well as the TD-14)-----------I don't get near as much done as you seem to up there in Montana.   One of these days----------maybe I will get her stripped down and solve her problems----------but it don't look like it will be today or tomorrow!!!!   (really have been skeptical about tearing it down and then not getting it back together before I catch the train)   I do love that old tractor!!!!!:wub:  

 

DD

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anson,

I'd bet a nickel you have a bad o-ring seal at the bottom of one of your four sleeves, allowing coolant into the oil pan. That is a pretty common thing with these IH wet sleeves. I could be wrong? I had that happen to one of the TD-18A's. I had to drop the pan, pull the head, pull the sleeve and put in a $1.50 o-ring, put the sleeve back in, the pan and head back on. Antifreeze isn't good for those bearings either.

With my rotator cuff problems, I probably better just stay here and clean up Mike's mezzanine, I think? I could probably still work on a Farmall Cub?

IH Farmall Cub tractor, A New Day on the farm ad.jpg

Gary;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tubacase47, Only you watch such things as that date! A decade of nonsense? Oh well, Tom, for your diligence and faithfulness, here are some of Montana's mining town's bands from yestercenturies. The Granite Miner's Coronet Band.

Granite Miners Coronet Band in front of the Granite, Montana mine superintendent’s house ~ca 1891.jpg

The Elkhorn Montana Brass Band.

Elkhorn Montana Brass Band 1889 red_edited-1.jpg

The Kendall Band and bandstand. My grandpa Sam Hamilton was a miner there for Harry Kendall and the Barnes-King mines in central Montana's Moccasin Mountains. He was a driller and blaster, down in the hole.

Kendall Band.jpg

The Maiden Band was over in the nearby Judith Mountains town of Maiden(ville).

Maiden band.jpg

And last but not least is the Gilt Edge band. Gilt Edge was also in the Judith Mountains. Gary;)

Gilt Edge Drug, Band.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Where the "Tubacase" comes from. Tom, born in 1947, is a tuba collector. He must have three or four of them? I could never play more than one of them at once. But, he'd likely come back with, "I (me) couldn't drive more than one tractor at once." Gary;)

tubacase47 and his tuba at Silver Creek 8-21-2014 red.jpg

15hp Case and Tubacase 47 red.jpg

I even got in on the fun... I did play double B flat Sousaphone in high school band...

Gary & BBflat tuba, 15hp Case 4-21-15 red crop.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for posting those old time band photos.  Band history is another of my hobbies; I wrote my Master's thesis on Army Bands during the Indian Wars and had it published 30 years ago.  I have lots of photos of Army Bands on the Western Frontier but they are on loan to a music teacher in California so I can't post any of them.

 

I just got home from a concert on which we played "Rifle Regiment March" in honor of composer John Philip Sousa's 162nd birthday.  This mach was composed and dedicated to the officers and men of the 3rd U.S. Infantry which was stationed at Fort Shaw, MT, 30 miles West of Great Falls.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...