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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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On 9/27/2016 at 8:33 PM, Howard_P said:

The smaller can appears to be an inspector's torch, used a wick in the spout, burned kerosene.  See http://amhistory.si.edu/onthemove/collection/object_129.html

Howard, Thank you for that information about the inspector's torch. I kind of had a hunch it was some kind of a torch.

You know me, junk shops, second hand stores and garage sales. There was a garage sale in Helena of a guy who moved here from North Dakota (he doesn't know how to spell that either) and was selling some good stuff.  I bought this chain saw from him, and he assured me it ran the last time he used it. He said he'd cut many trees from the forests in North Dakota mountains. I thought this would be great for firewood for the shop stove at Silver Creek this winter. And, I practically "stole" it.

North Dakota Chain Saw 9-28-16 red.jpg

I got my calf oxen training yoke back from our pastor and hung it back up near the ceiling in the shop. My wife doesn't like me up on ladders at my age, anymore. No problem. It's back up where it belongs.... hanging below the full size oxen yoke. And those photos behind the ladder.... Roger Byrne made that photo collage for Farmall Kid, when he was deployed to Afghanistan in 2008. Mike hung it above his bed at Camp Blackhorse, near Kabul. Somewhere I have a photo of it hanging, but it's not coming up with my description tonight. 

Calf Oxen training yoke back up 9-28-16 red.jpg

I spent a bunch of time getting everything cleared from the floor of the shed, in anticipation of backing the steam engines in one of these days. Everything is out of the shed, except those small items next to the threshing machine. The binder is ahead of the threshing machine. And this junk in the foreground is put out of the way too. (the ladder isn't junk). Gary;)

Shed empty, McCormick Deering thresher, binder 9-28-16 red.jpg 

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It looks like a young Amish guy had that to pull in the super stock class ;);)

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Bitty, You may have a point there??  Someone later reported that Farmall M had been operating in sand.

The rest of this stuff is just stuff I swiped off of Facebook. I always love TD-24's since I saw the first one to hit Montana, when I was a boy. My cousin worked at the IH Company Store in Great Falls and they had one in the showroom. And the TD-24 was the world's largest crawler tractor at that time. By the way... Did IH build Bucyrus Erie equipment such as the dozers and cans, or did they contract from Bucyrus? There was some kind of working relationship.

IH TD-24 crawler pulling a Bucyrus Erie can Gary W.jpg

Of course after school when I was in the first grade at Glengarry one room school, my job was to go get the milk cows, over a half mile trip up and a half mile back each school day. I got to drive Dad's Farmall Cub. I felt like pretty big stuff!

IH Farmall Cub ad.jpg

An introductory ad for three new McCormick tractors:

Three new McCormick Standard Tractors IHC 1939 ad.jpg

A Farmall Super MD cultivating. That must be cotton, Anson??

Farmall IH Super MD cultivating Jim Warehime.jpg

A Farmall Regular pulling a double disk.

IHC Farmall Regular pulling double disk-------.jpg

And I always love IH Dealerships.

Farmall Tractor IH Ad with dealership.jpg

Especially the early ones. Gary;)

IHC McCormick Deering dealership, 15-30 equipment.jpg

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Re:  Super MD cultivating

That is cotton------and on close inspection of the print on the umbrella; I can read Delta Implement Co.

They were the dealer here locally in Greenville----with branch stores in Indianola, Cleveland, and Rolling Fork, Ms as well as Manila and Blytheville Ark.  

edit:  also dealership in Yazoo City, Ms---knew I wuz missing one

Never remember many MD or Super MDs here locally in the Delta----but that scene is a "natural" for the mid-50s here in the Delta.

The late Harold H from here on the board probably could have shed more light on that picture-------his dad was long time manager of the Greenville store.

Will have to swipe to my files.

DD

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38 minutes ago, Delta Dirt said:

Re:  Super MD cultivating

That is cotton------and on close inspection of the print on the umbrella; I can read Delta Implement Co.

They were the dealer here locally in Greenville----with branch stores in Indianola, Cleveland, and Rolling Fork, Ms as well as Manila and Blytheville Ark.

Never remember many MD or Super MDs here locally in the Delta----but that scene is a "natural" for the mid-50s here in the Delta.

The late Harold H from here on the board probably could have shed more light on that picture-------his dad was long time manager of the Greenville store.

Will have to swipe to my files.

DD

Anson,

That's very interesting that I bumped into something (accidentally) that would touch close to home for you. I never ever saw a Super MD, but Dad and his brothers bought an MD before I started school, in 1949. I just don't remember how long before I started that they bought it. I always loved listening to the "Taka-taka-taka-taka-taka...." and watching the smoke rings as they poured out of the muffler when they started it up! The MD (same engine as the WD-6) and the WD-9's we had had that same rhythmic music emanating from their exhausts. The TD-40's had rhythm, but not the same mellowness the MD & WD-9 had. I don't have a photo of our MD. But this is one of the three WD-9's we had! And it is an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm! Gary;)

WD-9, 150 shovel drill, Tish sharp.jpg

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OK, I'm reporting back to class . . I have been paying attention, but haven't been able to say much.  I got a somewhat newer program installed in my Model T era computer so at least now, I can post comments again.  After all somebody has to keep Gary and Anson from getting too far out of line!?!?:rolleyes:
 
A short little up date on what I did last weekend. I helped at a friends little get-to-gether where we thrashed, ran the saw mill and did a little plowing with steam engines.  I've posted about this in the years past and it continues to be my favorite time to play with old iron. As was said by an old friend of mine, these types of shows are better than the big shows because every thing is working, people are having a good time with lots of visiting. always a good lunch :D. . . what more could a person ask for?"  The Budenski-Trestad get-to-gether is a great example of that.  
 
I didn't get time to take any good photos but here are a few from last Saturday anyway. 
The first shot is of the four steamers: Minneapolis, Advance, Port Huron and Case.
prevDsc08306.jpg
 
The second one is of the tractor line-up: 3 Averys, an Oil Pull and a Titan. 
prevDsc08312.jpg
 
Next is Bud's favorite engine, a 22HP Advance operated by Troy Vetsch.
prevDsc08324.jpg
 
The last photo is the 28HP Minneapolis that Jeff Lund and his two sons ran on the saw mill and also did a few rounds plowing.  The man in the white beard talking with Jeff is Ron Trelstad, Bud's great nephew.
prevDsc08318.jpg
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Roger is trying to keep me in line, I guess? I've been noticeably absent, but he is able to do that from a distance, I think. He was busy with the Trelstad Budinski show and I was busy helping get Mike & Randy's stuff put away in the shed. I don't know who had more fun or worked harder, Roger or me? And, by the way, Roger, it's nice to know you can get on here as a participant again! Maybe that computer needs the steam power unit replaced with a kerosene internal combustion engine. 

We got all of our firewood cut up that Mike had piled. (I used some of it today in the stove, as it was in the 40's here, and threatening snow in some spots.) We also crushed the rocks Mike had piled in the box of the crusher. It's pictured at the right in this photo.

15 hp Case, 20 hp Reeves east of shed 10-1-16 red.jpg

This is a picture I took inside Mike's shed today as I was still running leaf blower air through the boilers to dry them real dry. It's my bedtime, but I'll try to post more photos tomorrow?? Sadly, I didn't use my $2 digital camera. I used the better Fugifilm and have it set at a high setting, which makes it so almost one photo is all you can post at a time here on Red Power. I have to size all of my photos down in order to post them here. On Facebook and SmokStak, you can just post photos and it sizes them for you. 

20 hp Reeves, 15 hp Case in shed 10-3-16 red.jpg

But before I head to bed, I need to post a picture of Mike's 300 Utility in the shop stall. It's an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm.  Gary;)

300 Utility IH in shop 10-3-16 red.jpg

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It's 37 degrees, so our snow is melting as it hits, but I'm seeing white in the timber up above us. I guess we put the engines away in time, last Saturday.

Here's something for Anson. This is purportedly a Mississippi Road Service (McCormick) they're calling International (they have "Farmall" on their red placard but I'd call it a "Standard" like the rest of the WD-9's) Industrial tractor, apparently special ordered by them. While this might be "old home week" for Anson, I've never seen anything like it.

McCormick M-R-S (Mississippi Road Service) Industrial tractor at Rantoul, Sam Moore.jpg

I'd wonder if this photo of a lady driving this farmall H might be during WWII? A neat old photo anyway. I can't tell you what she's cultivating either.

Lady operating Farmall H in field IH.jpg

I don't know how many of you old guys, like me, used to go into the IH dealership with your dad, and while he was talking to the dealer about business, you wandered looking at the rack of information folders on new IH equipment? I wouldn't doubt this was one of those photographs. A Farmall Super C pulling a tiny IH combine and an L-120 IH Pickup picking up grain. 

Farmall IH Super C, pull type combine and L 120 IH Pickup.jpg

I have chores listed at Silver Creek, by my taskmaster, so I must get going. Gary;)

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On ‎30‎/‎09‎/‎2016 at 11:33 PM, Old Binder Guy said:

Anson,

That's very interesting that I bumped into something (accidentally) that would touch close to home for you. I never ever saw a Super MD, but Dad and his brothers bought an MD before I started school, in 1949. I just don't remember how long before I started that they bought it. I always loved listening to the "Taka-taka-taka-taka-taka...." and watching the smoke rings as they poured out of the muffler when they started it up! The MD (same engine as the WD-6) and the WD-9's we had had that same rhythmic music emanating from their exhausts. The TD-40's had rhythm, but not the same mellowness the MD & WD-9 had. I don't have a photo of our MD. But this is one of the three WD-9's we had! And it is an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm! Gary;)

WD-9, 150 shovel drill, Tish sharp.jpg

i have read in the recent book "IH Canada" that IH had a major player role in this kind of products (seeders made in Hamilton ) more than 50% market share in Canada market ! Congrats for the intensive work of this important subsidiary, not enough known - the recent book has allowed me to understand that a lot of machines were built in Hamilton - SP mowers, manure spreaders, soil implements with a state of the art disks producing, i also remember when i was young, the two letters HA for the moldboard plows parts, in my dealership, a line of crawlers  discontinued in 1976 ( T4 T5 TD 5 - 500E etc) - Nice people, nice affiliate company, nice results...Despite the difficulties of the parent company - Vive le Canada.

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On 10/5/2016 at 9:58 AM, JEAN COINTE FRANCE said:

i have read in the recent book "IH Canada" that IH had a major player role in this kind of products (seeders made in Hamilton ) more than 50% market share in Canada market ! Congrats for the intensive work of this important subsidiary, not enough known - the recent book has allowed me to understand that a lot of machines were built in Hamilton - SP mowers, manure spreaders, soil implements with a state of the art disks producing, i also remember when i was young, the two letters HA for the moldboard plows parts, in my dealership, a line of crawlers  discontinued in 1976 ( T4 T5 TD 5 - 500E etc) - Nice people, nice affiliate company, nice results...Despite the difficulties of the parent company - Vive le Canada.

Jean, Much of International Harvester Co. was manufactured in Canada. I remember seeing that written on much of Dad's equipment when I was a kid. This is our son's 22" McCormick-Deering Threshing Machine. It was made in Canada! Gary;)

McCormick Deering threshing machine Made In Canada- red.jpg

McCormick Deering threshing machine Made In Canada close red.jpg

McCormick Deering thresher manual Made In Canada red.jpg

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22 minutes ago, Old Binder Guy said:

Jean, Much of International Harvester Co. was manufactured in Canada. I remember seeing that written on much of Dad's equipment when I was a kid. This is our son's 22" McCormick-Deering Threshing Machine. It was made in Canada! Gary;)

 

 

White ground with three to four inches of snow in my part of Sask. More elsewhere. All my IH trucks are, not too surprisingly, Hamilton built. 

RG working on Massey.JPG

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I believe my 77 loadstar and my 1986 S1900 tandem are Hamilton built

 

in this area there were only 2 brand IH or Massey Ferguson for Diskers or Diskall depending on your calling as well as cultivators they were either IH or Morris

 

Everything IH Built in Hamilton is Very Very good quality Built

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8 hours ago, 664 CDN said:

Maybe the early ones Ralph,

But Chatham had the truck plant until they closed a couple years ago

Jean Cointe, You will notice I own a TD 5  with a Drott loader.

Ray

Chatham, that is the name I was trying to think of. I remember someone, maybe you Ray, pointing that out to me that even though is says Hamilton on the I.D. tags, the truck factory was at Chatham. 

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Thanks for your comments - i remember in the show room of my dealership in 1960 a TD 5 - i did'nt know at this time ( 8 years old ) that this mighty tractor was assembled at Hamilton factory !

Chatham et Hamilton were the main production sites, and Burlington was a huge master parts depot.... a lot of memories in this nice book.... essential in your library or on your shelves !

 

3iNaxQ.jpg

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Not trying to change the subject but I took this picture of the snow in my yard yesterday morning using the antique "Waterous" folding ruler to show the depth. Unfortunately the stains on the lower part make it hard to read the number. It was about 3 and a half inches. Very unwelcome at this time. 

Waterous Ruler.jpg

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Ralph, that folding rule is spectacular! To use your own Waterous steam engine ad, that ruler talks about their double cylinder steam engine! That's amazing you still have that!! I'm super impressed. Waterous was a popular engine in Canada. I've never seen one in person, but I'd love to before I check out!

Waterous stem traction engine ad Ralph.jpg

Wednesday, I took Mike's pickup and the trailer to town to pick up this culvert. Mike drilled holes last evening, and I'll finish drilling the last half of the holes today. This will be put vertically into a pit across Silver Creek, gravel in the bottom and around the culvert. Mike's going to use this as an irrigation well. He did all of the paper work with the State of Montana after our oats crop droughted out this summer. Who knows, maybe we'll thresh oats again next August? Gary;)

Mike's irrigation well culvert, Pacific, 10-5-16 red.jpg

PS: If his oats could have looked like his driveway looks in the photo above, we wouldn't be going to this trouble. Unfortunately, it got very dry and too long of periods between very little moisture. It burned badly, early.

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That was the Waterous ad I was thinking of Gary. I have no idea how my grandfather/great uncles got this ruler but I'm glad it survived. Here is a bit better picture of it without all that ugly white snow in the scene. 

Waterous ruler 2.jpg

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Oats sure are an important commodity to produce----we appreciate your efforts Professor.

The famous horse Wrangler liked oats---------------and many years ago; I had a bumper sticker on my p-up stating:

"support wildlife-----spread some wild oats!!"

For some reason-----both my wife and mother didn't think it was as funny as me and my buddies??:ph34r::rolleyes:

Beautiful day downhere-----90° with cool dry breeze.  The hurricane is putting a hel!uva sideswipe on the east coast---not pretty.

DD

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Re:  the MRS version of the WD-9 several posts back.

Mississippi Road Supply was the long serving IHC industrial dealer in the state and had a close working relationship with IH. 

They developed a dirt scraper with a weight transfer hitch using the WD-9 as the prime mover.  As far as I know----the MRS version was the basic version with heavy ply tires and probably modified hitch and hydraulics.  They later developed a series of full 4 wheel drive componentized tractors-----for both ag and industrial use.  I believe its LenRay here on the forum that has one.  Had alot of military contracts.

My dad was friends with the management and my wife's dad worked with them in sales before switching over to Caterpillar in late 40's-----early 50's.

They were really good people.

DD

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