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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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Tomorrow, friend Roger will will walk out of work with his lunch box and probably a paycheck? It will be the last time he does that. Congratulations on a well deserved "retirement" so you can go home and work harder than ever and wonder how the heck you ever had time to work another job! I grabbed this photo off of Facebook last night. It show our friend Troy Vetsch engineering friend Bud's Advance steam engine. The guy in the choo choo cap, behind the engine is none other than our retiree, Roger. (PS: Troy isn't texting. He's digging a wood sliver out of his finger.)

Troy Vetsch on Bud Budinski's Advance, Roger behind in choo choo cap.jpg

I finished up the oak board I mounted the fire hose rack and valve on, then did a messy job of hanging up the canvas fire hose. It's just for looks. Not for use.

Fire Hose up on board in shop 9-14-16 red.jpg

It will live behind the tool box lid, so won't be very visible, unless we put the lid down on the tool box.Fire hose on shop wall, tool box lid opened 9-14-16 red.jpg

I took this photo of the TD-40 and part of the F-12 from up on the threshing machine last month. They are IH Tractors on a Montana Farm... Gary;)

Aerial view of TD-40 & F-12 McCormick Deerings from thresher 8-3-16 red.jpg

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Some folks just won't leave a subject such as "hats/caps" alone.:ph34r:

I've got to get me a pair of those pin striped overalls---------to go with my "official" steam engineer's cap.  I know it is an "official" engineer's cap since it was mailed directly from "the University" in Racine, Mn.

:huh:B):D

*********

Congratulations on your new job Roger.

 

DD

 

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15 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

Lead vs babbit

What keeps the lead and tin from seperating in the heating/pouring process--------are there certain temp ranges that need to be adhered to when heating????

 

DD

Anson, Maybe Roger (now that he is retired?) will chime in on babbitt. He has poured more babbitt than anyone I know.

I don't know how many of you followed the plowing event near Concordia, Kansas last weekend? I would loved to have gone. I was part of the poster page advertising, helping the guys on Facebook. They were looking to setting a world's record for old tractors or steam engines plowing in one field. I didn't follow that part of it. I was just posting old photos of steamers plowing. A good friend of mine, Mark Ohlde, has his 25 hp Reeves at Salina, Kansas, and had it hauled to Concordia. A mutual friend of ours, Ted Housos, runs the engine for (Dr.) Mark, as he's still a little unsure of himself. The mutual friend is a Kansas boiler inspector, I'd met years ago, when he stopped at our place near Whitefish and had lunch with us. So, I'm sorry I can't post more results, but I wanted to post these photos of 25 hp Reeves double simple, Canadian Special #7,200. Gary;)

25 hp Reeves Canadian Special double simple, Mark Ohlde's plowing.jpg

25 hp Reeves double simple Canadian Special of Mark Ohlde's plowing (side) at Concordia, Kansas 9-2016.jpg

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I was just a kid when my dad was pouring babbit and I never learned much about the babbit process--------  "mostly just stay back out of the way 'cause this stuff is hot".

Am thinking they were rebuilding the old Link Belt dragline or possibly pouring roller bearings for the TD-24??

I have the original counter balance weight from the dragline as my table top for my welding table.  They had pulled the weight off when they added a larger fuel tank. Makes the welding table a very stationary object!!!

Hoping Roger can borrow his wife's computer so to make a few comments here in the classroom ocassionally.

DD

 

 

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5 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

I was just a kid when my dad was pouring babbit and I never learned much about the babbit process--------  "mostly just stay back out of the way 'cause this stuff is hot".

Am thinking they were rebuilding the old Link Belt dragline or possibly pouring roller bearings for the TD-24??

I have the original counter balance weight from the dragline as my table top for my welding table.  They had pulled the weight off when they added a larger fuel tank. Makes the welding table a very stationary object!!!

Hoping Roger can borrow his wife's computer so to make a few comments here in the classroom ocassionally.

DD

 

 

Anson, My dad used to pour lots of babbitt when I was a kid, and I knew it was hot too. I learned the hard way too! I used to shoot Sharps Rifles back in the 1980's and cast my own lead bullets. I remember once being in the shade of our back porch pouring bullet lead, getting ready for a shoot at Virginia City. It was warm and I was hot. As I moved my forehead over the lead pot to get a dipper of lead, a drop of sweat went into the lead pot and blew lead all over the place and I got burned well then. Remember, as I've stated before, a drop of water expands (instantly) nearly 1700 times when turning to steam. I sure proved that fact to myself that day. Those were fun times. I was shooting a 16 pound 45-2&7/8 Sharps I used to own.

me & 45-110 (2&7-8) Sharps at Virginia City - red.jpg

This was the shooting lineup, shooting the 1000 yard target.

Virginia City Buffler Runners firing line.jpg

My steam friend and mentor, Austin Monk had a terrific collection of Sharps rifles. Enough his daughter wrote a book about them. He's waiting for his turn to shoot.

Austin Monk watching 1000 yard shooting at Virginia City Montana red_edited-1.jpg

 

And where I mostly enjoyed spending my days with Austin. He's below on the fireman's deck of the 40 hp Peerless steam engine he built out of pieces and parts from all over the northwestern USA and southwestern Canada. I was at the throttle above, and another close friend, and mentor, Carl Mehmke was at the steering wheel. Our friend and steam man, David Vanek Jr. is on the water tank. More great memories for an old brain. Me Gary, Carl Mehmke, David Vanek Jr. and Austin Monk on 40 hp Peerless.jpg

And last but not least, me and two squeezeboxes and an engineer's polka dot cap (like on the Peerless above) are going to Choteau, Montana to Tubacase47's show tomorrow. A bunch of us wanna be musicians are getting together. A semi pro accordion player from Great Falls will be there, a tuba player and a tenor banjo player, besides this old guy. But.... The boys are firing up these engines (without me!) tomorrow here at Helena. This fuzzy photo was through the steering wheel of the Model T, with my cheap TracFone camera. There'll be two steam engines operating at Choteau, so I won't miss out completely. Gary;)

1926 Model T Coupe, 20 Reeves, 15 Case through wheel 7-13-16 red.jpg

PS: I've got a heck of a mess with these photos. I don't know how to remove the ones placed where I don't want them located. Maybe when Roger gets done cleaning his shop, he'll fill me in? I figured it out!!! Right click on the photo you want to remove and click on "Cut" and they go away!:)

 

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Saw this interesting method of plowing in Germany ( it's not IH or Montana ,  But plenty of steam )

 

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23 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

click on "Cut" and they go away!

Those right "right click " options are mighty handy ,  You may have noticed there is a "paste" option there also .

after the picture or sentence ( you may have to highlight sentences with your mouse) is "cut" it comes along with you wherever you venture . then when you are in a place where you would like it , right click and hit "paste" and presto there it is . 

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12 hours ago, Tubacase47 said:

I spent a good part of the afternoon listening to Professor Yaeger and five other guys (3 more accordions, 1 tuba, and 1 banjo) make music.

I never even thought to have you take a photograph with the other ($2 junk shop) camera in my bag, Tom. All I have are videos I can't post here, since I can no longer get into my Photobucket site anymore. Gary:(

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Kevin, Those European plowing outfits are something else. Due to small and even tiny fields, they can plow in that manner. Small fields are common too. There is twice the cash outlay to do it that way, with two of those huge engines. Thankfully my European relatives came to America, as I prefer direct pull plowing, although having never done it the European way of cable plowing.

After I arose Saturday morning, this was on my cell phone from Mike. He and Randy had both engines fired. Randy gave rides on the Reeves to multiple friends of his from his church. Then later, they put the Case on the buzz saw and sawed another pickup load of wood Mike bought at a post yard. They left it (the Case) there, so I'll get a picture of that today at Silver Creek, where I was given permission to work on the lawn tractor that mows the rock infested ground there around the shop and shed.

20 hp Reeves and 15 hp Case smoking 9-16-16_edited-1.jpg

I can't believe I only took videos at Choteau Saturday. I can't be trusted... I was busy. I ran steam engines, played music and visited with people you only see once a year. The music took up lots of time. I got three songs posted to Facebook yesterday and last night. Thank you Tom Railsback for running my cheapo Fujifilm camera in the video mode!

It wasn't real windy at Choteau, which is a ways from the Rocky Mountain Front. But the road home was a bugger. I about lost the car a time or two, had I not been prepared and alert. There was an alert out on the Rocky front for high winds. I've ridden with a seasoned pilot in a 182 RG (retractable gear) Cessna, riding the wave of the Rockies and measuring minus 3 mph on the DME (distance measuring equipment) back to Great Falls. It didn't have the "snot" to break over that wave with full power and 15 degrees climbing attitude, often losing altitude from the wave. My point...? It is a nasty, nasty wind that can only be described by being there. Many pilots made fatal errors trying to conquer that front in these situations, over the decades. Larger planes with oxygen capability probably don't even know it is happening below, since they can climb way above the 12,000 feet limit, over the small planes with no oxygen facilities aboard their planes. These clouds hung there on the front all day.

Nasty, mean clouds, high winds over Rocky Mountain Front, 9-17-16 red.jpg

This was someone's dreams dashed, that I passed by on the way home that evening. After having supper with three of the other musicians at Choteau's Log Cabin Cafe, this was up the highway about 30 miles, and sure wasn't there when I went over Saturday morning. There were 12 wheels under this new mobile home that flipped. I don't know what it did to the truck pulling it. I can see what happened to the hitch. This was all that was there on my way home.

Someone's dream mobile home upside down between Choteau & Fairfield 9-17-16 red.jpg

I was real busy driving, after this scene. I was glad to make it to Interstate 15, near Wolf Creek, as it's all protected in Wolf Creek and Prickly Pear Creek Canyons from the wind, pretty much anyway. Gary;)

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When I got to Silver Creek, the Case steam engine was parked where it was supposed to be, so it wasn't left at the buzz saw afterall. I took time today to clean up and work on the old Craftsman lawn tractor. I bought it 14 years ago and it was several years old then. It's been a pretty fair old mowing tractor, in rock country. Gary;)

 

Craftsman Lawn Tractor mower blades 9-19-16 red.jpg

Craftsman lawn tractor, 20 hp Reeves, 15 hp Case 9-19-16 red.jpg

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The old Craftsman lawn tractor looked good parked in the shed again. Yes... I wish it was a Cub Cadet. I had two of them, but they're gone.

Craftsman lawn tractor in shed 9-19-16 red-.jpg

I rearranged some tools atop the cabinet in the shop where I just "stack" tools.

Tools atop east cabinet, on shop wall 9-19-16 red.jpg

And last but not least, I had to take this selfie with the F-12, since it's an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm. Gary;)

IHC Farmall F-12 & selfie 9-19-16 red_edited-1.jpg

 

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Breaking out the big gun?  ;)  Looks like some serious wrenching. 

I once had an RV try to do that rumpled box conversion. Luckily it didn't get into that much trouble. Made for about 20 miles of super tense driving. I stayed in the left lane and drifted right when the real heavy gusts hit. 

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Tubacase47, so you and Gary Larson know, I got things ready to put the engines away soon. Water tanks filled, fireboxes ready with wood so more or less throw matches in and it's a go.

Wood to fire engines to put away, Case 9-21-16 red.jpg

Wood to fire engines to put away 9-21-16 red.jpg

One of our pastors, preaching tonight and this Sunday wanted to know if I had an oxen yoke. I said I had two. He asked to borrow an oxen yoke for his sermon. I explained the standard size one is heavy and awkward and fastened at the ceiling, so it was operating off of a tall ladder. I said the small one is the same thing, just smaller and much lighter. He said it'd be fine. He was elated when I dropped it off at the church on my way home from Silver Creek today.Oxen & oxen calf yokes on wall red.jpg

This is that small one I took to our pastor. This isn't a miniature someone made a model of. It was used in yoking two oxen calves together, to train them to work and pull together. I'm anxious to see and hear Sunday, how the pastor is using this yoke! I think I know, but maybe I don't?!! Gary;)

Calf Oxen training yoke red 9-21-16.jpg

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Don't want to be unequally yoked 

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15 hours ago, bitty said:

Don't want to be unequally yoked 

My thoughts exactly bitty.

I don't know anything. Some stuff I absconded from Facebook... This IHC "motor cultivator" from ca. 1917. IHC was experimenting a bunch, pre-farmall, to come up with a tractor that could do row crops. 

International Harvester motor cultivator tractor ca 1917.jpg

I thought of Ralph when I saw this one! A Cockshutt 60 on steel wheels!

Cockshutt 60 on steel wheels Old Farm Tractors.jpg

And last, but not least is this John Deere D with dual wheels grading a gravel road from the Furrow (John Deere) magazine. Gary;)

John Deere from the Furrow Magazine, tractor with duals grading a road John Huon.jpg

 

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Today, Mike and I took his pickup up into the mountains where they have some property they've used for the last 20+ years as a camping spot. For some improvements, he cut down trees and made logs for widening the trail so he can get our trailer up there. Someday, he'd like to build a 14 X 20 small cabin in a nice spot up there. We had a pretty good sized load of cordwood for the trip home. Someday, they'll go through the buzz saw at Silver Creek.

Mike felling falling tree log Woods Creek, 9-24-2016 red.jpg

More stuff from Facebook. A Model T improvised truck and a Fordson Tractor. What did this guy tell his horses, I wonder?

Model T Truck & Fordson Tractor Friday Old Farm Tractors 9-23-16 red.jpg

This is a photo of a Waterloo Boy tractor plowing, and the trusty Model T standing by.

Waterloo Boy tractor, Model T Gary W.jpg

Who knows, that could have been an IH event above? I don't totally understand this concept with IHC?

Waterloo Boy Tractor, IHC literature.jpg

Long past the Waterloo Boy stage of green paint, this was a John Deere 830 diesel tractor with steel wheels. Gary;)

830 John Deere tractor on steel wheels John Huon.jpg

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12 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

I don't totally understand this concept with IHC?

IHC /McCormick Deering donated a huge collection of literature to the Wisconsin Historical Society , Amongst all the

wonderful images and documents is advertising brochures from many of the competing manufacturers of agricultural and

construction equipment .  I think it was just one of the ways to keep their salesmen abreast of the latest developments

in the markets , Thus giving them some ammunition/information  when making the rounds in their territory , ( just my opinion)

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Re:  JD and IHC early advertising

My dad had the early Farmall dealership here in Greenville during the early Farmall Regular days-------selling his dealership and taking a job with Harvester as the "Farmall specialist" in 16 southeastern states.

When the 4010/3010 JD four and six cylinder engine series came out (1960 or so)--------my dad laughed saying that back in the Regular days;  that if they thought they might be losing a sale----- the favorite trick was to slip up beside the farmer and tell them about the four cylinder JD that they had seen on the Deere test farm.  Stating the they expected Deere to introduce the four cylinders tractors the next year.

Let's see------that would have been in the late '20s----early '30s.  Seems like the 4010's entered the market about 30 yrs later!!!!!

Think that fits in the Blue Smoke category Professor.B)

*****

Red, green, or purple------I would love to own a 830 with those "syrup can" size pistons.

 

DD

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Speaking of Blue Smoke I'm getting ready for SHillary and Trumpet here soon. Today I spent getting stuff out of the shed so we can soon put our steam engines away for the winter. So I have to get off of her, because the "in the window" antenna won't work with this thing working. Gary:angry:

IH Tractors on a Montana Farm, 9-26-16 red.jpg

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Some Facebook stuff... This is a neat 15-30 Mogul IHC and a great looking grain elevator setup for a farm. I knew of few farms that were NOT set up this well when I was young and on the farm.

IHC Mogul tractor at barn Jeanne Young.jpg

Is this the CaseIH Concept tractor next?

CaseIH 1000 (hp) concept tractor 9-12-2016.jpg

This is for Tubacase47, who's likely on the road to visit his sister? Some kind of a Case tractor.

1931 Case tractor for Tubacase47.jpg

I stopped by a friend's shop on the way to Silver Creek yesterday and he gave me these two items. I know what the long spout oilcan is for. The other one I don't quite understand. I do understand the N.P.R. stamped in the tag, though, being we're here in an old Northern Pacific Railroad town. It seems like I've seen something like this pot, but with a large round wick, similar to an old kerosene road flare. Maybe one of you railroad buffs will know? Gary;)

 

Oilcan long spout, pot, from Corky 9-26-16 red.jpg

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