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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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A Happy Farmer tractor is on my veeery long wish list. Very long.

Last evening a scene jumped in front of my camera that is not a tractor, not in Montana, not anything like that at all. It is simply intended to start off the week on a calm and relaxed note.

Charlie

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That's a beautiful photo you took Charlie!

The steering on that Happy Farmer is a "toughie". This very evening, when Mike was plowing, he ended up getting "tennis elbow" and I'm not sure he ever really got over it. It was a fun little tractor and a real crowd pleaser. Gary ;)

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I went to Silver Creek today and don't feel worse for the wear yet, but I was kind of dizzy this morning. No, Roger, that isn't normal. <_< I never snapped one picture today so I'm going to post another picture that was with the last pair I posted of the Rumely Oilpull #1 and the LaCrosse Happy Farmer. This is a "line drive" LaCrosse tractor, driven with a pair of leather reins, which should make the farmer who just sold Dobbin and bought this, right at home?? This gentleman is riding a plow, holding onto the reins.

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In 1958, I attended a steam and tractor show/threshing bee at Waterloo, Iowa and a gentleman there had a LaCrosse "line drive" tractor that he rode around in his buggy, to drive the tractor pulling the buggy. Gary ;)

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A Happy Farmer tractor is on my veeery long wish list. Very long.

Last evening a scene jumped in front of my camera that is not a tractor, not in Montana, not anything like that at all. It is simply intended to start off the week on a calm and relaxed note.

Charlie

Nice shot Charlie. Not often I notice such a view here. I did take time to take a shot or two here as it was pretty scenic between clouds and rain showers. I got in maybe 3 or 4 hours combining canola before rain showers put a stop to such activity. Nice rainbow but not what we want to see this time of year. I guess theres worse things though.

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Since I have no new photos, here are a couple from a couple of weeks ago at my 70th celebration.

This was Maverik at the throttle and uncle Mike, as Mike was helping Maverik polish his skills on a steam engine after a few years absence aboard it.

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This picture shows my "girlfriend" of yesteryear, going for a ride in my Model T Coupe with me. When I met Mary Ellen, I was just out of the 8th grade and she was just out of the 7th grade. I had been from the one room Glengarry School and she was from Winifred, about 40 miles north of Lewistown. We'd met at 4-H Camp, the only year I'd ever gone. She was an old hand at 4-H and remained in it for years. Actually, my old Twoli accordion was the "bait!" I took her to the Central Montana Fair later that summer. She and my Sharon both became 1962 graduates, Mary Ellen of Winifred and Sharon of Moore and were "competitive" cheerleaders for four years. Then those two ended up on the same dormitory floor at Eastern Montana College in Billings in the fall of 1962. Sharon and I married in 1963 and those two remained friends to this day. Sharon always says, "We can ignore each other for months, then take right off where we left off the last time." Needless to say, Mary Ellen is both of our friends, and her husband Marc is a retired MD out of Great Falls and Choteau, Montana. He's a neat guy and his ride came before hers. (My daughter was taking the pictures... I was driving.) Our invitations said "no gifts, please!" but Mary Ellen and Marc brought me a copy of the Winifred community history book put out just this summer. Winifred was "born" a century ago in 1913, and my mother was born there in that area in 1913! What a treasure it is for me!Gary ;)

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Well, I'd never had a post pulled before one I'd posted last night. I didn't think I was being irrational in mentioning that Mike has been home on "furlough" this week and I've enjoyed my time with him being there, regardless of what our govt. is doing elsewhere. He'll get paid for being furloughed, so it isn't much of a hardship. He said he would never use vacation time to build a roller, so this time has worked real well for him. I took this picture of him and his 1944 Farmall M, Toot, hitched to his roller this morning. It's nothing he'd enter in a "beauty contest" but it is solid and functional. He was having a good time rolling his road and some of his landscaping around his house. And this sure makes for an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm!

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Another thing from today. Likely 10 years ago, he was planning for his shed and his shop. He used graph paper to outline the buildings, then he cut out scale size "rectangles" to place in their locations in either the shed or the shop. The shed kind of has elbow room now, as the stacks of plywood, OSB, lumber, studs and whatever he had stacked in the shed for the past 7 or 8 years, in anticipation of building a house, which was started last summer and finished this spring. There's only one "left over" lumber pile now, between the Reeves steam engine and the threshing machine, so with the Model T Coupe and the Model TT gone, as of today, the shed has elbow room, as I said. The shop is tighter, but he'd planned for the Model T & TT, plus his 1957 Chevy and 1953 Ford F-350 to all be inside the shop. This winter, I'll fix the brakes in the F-350, so it may go to the shed later... That's Mike's call. I know he'd originally planned on the F-350 to be in the shop. I sort of only just "work there." He may be looking for a steel wheel Farmall Regular for all I know? I don't think so, but like I say, "I just (sort of) work there." Gary ;)

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OBG you mentioned Mike being furloughed over on the Vintage ads thread. Reading your post I wonder if you thought you were posting on IH tractors on a Montana farm. You first commented about the AC Roto baler and then you continued with Mike building his lawn roller which you discuss over here.

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An old postcard showing a threshing scene near Gravelbourg, Sask. around 1915. Is the big tank a water tank? It would indicate a steam powered tractor but this one looks more like a gas powered tractor. (No smoke stack).

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OBG you mentioned Mike being furloughed over on the Vintage ads thread. Reading your post I wonder if you thought you were posting on IH tractors on a Montana farm. You first commented about the AC Roto baler and then you continued with Mike building his lawn roller which you discuss over here.

BOBHIS856,

I could have done some dumb thing like that. Over 70 means trouble at our house... I remember writing it out and putting the same roller picture with Mike in it. I'd have sworn I posted it here, but who knows? I mentioned the $enate and kongress and figured the machine kicked me out? OBG :ph34r:

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An old postcard showing a threshing scene near Gravelbourg, Sask. around 1915. Is the big tank a water tank? It would indicate a steam powered tractor but this one looks more like a gas powered tractor. (No smoke stack).

Ralph,

That is a "gasoline" or "kerosene" tank wagon. I'd hate to have to fill the $ucker today. The gas tractor is a 30-60 Pioneer tractor on that short threshing belt. Great photo!! Gary ;)

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Ralph, that tractor is a 30-60 Pioneer that was built in Winona, Minnesota . . . about 60 miles from me. The tank you see is a fuel tank. The companies that made water wagons also started building fuel wagons as the big gas tractors started to take over. Pioneer tractors used a four-cylinder engine that was horizontally-opposed which made for a smooth running engine. The only other prairie tractor companies I can think of that used that lay-out were Avery and Imperial.
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Note: I don't know what's going on with the posting here, but when I wrote this post, Gary had not responded to Ralph's Pioneer photo. I can understand the hour differences (time zone) but not the minute differences. Oh well, it must just be a "ciber-space" thing?!?!
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You know ,l the name Pioneer was somewhere in the back of my mind when I was looking at that tractor but did not take the time to research it further. Thanks for confirming it. I guess those big gas burners needed a good sized tank of fuel to get them through the day. Since I am back here again and unable to harvest today, here is a street scene from many years ago in the little village of Pense, Sask. Looks like a Model T or two there.

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You know ,l the name Pioneer was somewhere in the back of my mind when I was looking at that tractor but did not take the time to research it further. Thanks for confirming it. I guess those big gas burners needed a good sized tank of fuel to get them through the day. Since I am back here again and unable to harvest today, here is a street scene from many years ago in the little village of Pense, Sask. Looks like a Model T or two there.

Ralph,

Just the touring car at right is the only Model T. Appears to be between 1909 and 1912 in age. The other old automobiles are very interesting.

I went to Silver Creek today, but didn't take one picture. Stayed pretty close to the fire as it was a darn chilly wind outside. Snow a couple hundred feet in elevation higher than Mike's place.

I did take this picture of a bunch of my antique shovels, etc., yesterday. Several of the shovels on the right side are from the 19th century, at least in styling and manufacturing methods. They have been stacked under the feeder of Mike's McCormick threshing machine, so to get them out from underfoot, I hung them from the truss joists. Gary ;)

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Gary,

Where is the barbed wire from? There has to be a story if that is hung up in the museum, er shed.

It must me unique or a reminder of something from a mishap. :) It is too short to do much fencing with.

You guys can keep the snow up there for a couple more months, alright?

Ron

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Are the shovels suspended from baling wire or high tensile? Had to ask since someone commented on the wire vs twine tie balers about how versatile baling wire can be.

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Gary,

Where is the barbed wire from? There has to be a story if that is hung up in the museum, er shed.

It must me unique or a reminder of something from a mishap. :) It is too short to do much fencing with.

You guys can keep the snow up there for a couple more months, alright?

Ron

Ron,

It had to have something to do with being observant about spraying crops and recognize when barbed wire was approaching?? :) You have keen eyesight when it comes to barbed wire, I assure you.

There was still about a quarter mile of this wire left at the homestead, when I left there. I was always going to replace it, but never got around to it. There was this small roll kicking around the ranch, all my life. I did have the forethought to take it with me. There is likely a hundred feet or so? I put a close up of the wire from my wife's book about my grandparents in the year 2000. I cropped the photo I posted as well. According to Google, Scutts barbed wire in this style was patented June 18, 1878. My grandpa had fenced pasture with this wire, to keep livestock out of his hay and grain crops, sometime after filing for homestead on September 28, 1881.

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We're going to keep our snow here for a while yet. I love the coolness after a summer of stifling 90 degree days on end. I'm back wearing tee shirts and long handles already, but I don't mind putting on clothing to stay warm. I dislike it when I take everything off (within reason) and still can't get cooled off. You'll never catch me being a "snow bird" like the multitudes I'll see going down Interstate 15 here in the next weeks, travelling south in their motorhomes.

BOBSIH856,

The wire is baling wire. I can buy it at the hardware store's locally and it's called, "Montana Farm Repair Kit." It'll hold forever inside the building. It might rot off outside in 30 years? We're high desert here.

Gary ;)

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I'd agree, Ron has a good eye for detail. I never even noticed the barbed wire til he mentioned it. That is a unique style I have not seen.. I've rolled up miles of it here removing old fences to make bigger fields.

And Gary, we agree on the weather. A little heat goes a long way with me, but I can't stand a lot of cold either unless I am well dressed. 5 layers on the top half felt about right this afternoon while I was pailing oats into the vintage IH hammer mill. Mostly cloudy and cool with poor drying conditions but when the sun came out it made some impressive scenery.

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Ralph, that tractor is a 30-60 Pioneer that was built in Winona, Minnesota . . . about 60 miles from me. The tank you see is a fuel tank. The companies that made water wagons also started building fuel wagons as the big gas tractors started to take over. Pioneer tractors used a four-cylinder engine that was horizontally-opposed which made for a smooth running engine. The only other prairie tractor companies I can think of that used that lay-out were Avery and Imperial.
Note: I don't know what's going on with the posting here, but when I wrote this post, Gary had not responded to Ralph's Pioneer photo. I can understand the hour differences (time zone) but not the minute differences. Oh well, it must just be a "ciber-space" thing?!?!

Roger,

When I posted, I didn't see your post either! Thanks for you input, and photos!

Ralph,

This was my aunt Ina, who was newlywed to Dad's oldest brother Frank. They were living at "the camp" while he farmed and they built their new home (that soon burned). Notice the barrels in the foreground which were used for gasoline for their Aultman-Taylor (not opposed cylinders!), which had four cylinders and burned gasoline. I don't think dad and his brothers ever owned a "gas wagon", but had at least two, and I think, three water wagons, which Roger stated are basically one in the same, but the gas wagons were generally galvanized, I think.

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This was neighbor Johnny Tresch, who was operating our 30-60 Aultman-Taylor around the time of the first photo. Ina and aunt Clo are in the picture, as they were the "cook shack" girls, who fed the threshing crew.

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Today I took a picture of the 20 hp Reeves and the 15 hp Case all bedded down for the winter, in Mike's shed. Notice it took it over the top of an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm! Gary ;)

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I'd agree, Ron has a good eye for detail. I never even noticed the barbed wire til he mentioned it. That is a unique style I have not seen.. I've rolled up miles of it here removing old fences to make bigger fields.

And Gary, we agree on the weather. A little heat goes a long way with me, but I can't stand a lot of cold either unless I am well dressed. 5 layers on the top half felt about right this afternoon while I was pailing oats into the vintage IH hammer mill. Mostly cloudy and cool with poor drying conditions but when the sun came out it made some impressive scenery.

Ralph,

That made for a nice photo of you powering the IH hammer mill with the old Cockshutt! Thanks for posting it.

Roger mentioned that Avery and Imperial are the only other tractors, besides Pioneer, that had the four cylinder opposed engines. (Take it easy Roger... :rolleyes: ... I don't know of any other tractors like that!) Here is an Avery (Roger can ID the hp on for us).

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And a 40-70 Imperial. Gary ;)

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Gary,

Where is the barbed wire from? There has to be a story if that is hung up in the museum, er shed.

It must me unique or a reminder of something from a mishap. :) It is too short to do much fencing with.

You guys can keep the snow up there for a couple more months, alright?

Ron

Ron,

It had to have something to do with being observant about spraying crops and recognize when barbed wire was approaching?? :) You have keen eyesight when it comes to barbed wire, I assure you.

There was still about a quarter mile of this wire left at the homestead, when I left there. I was always going to replace it, but never got around to it. There was this small roll kicking around the ranch, all my life. I did have the forethought to take it with me. There is likely a hundred feet or so? I put a close up of the wire from my wife's book about my grandparents in the year 2000. I cropped the photo I posted as well. According to Google, Scutts barbed wire in this style was patented June 18, 1878. My grandpa had fenced pasture with this wire, to keep livestock out of his hay and grain crops, sometime after filing for homestead on September 28, 1881.

Gary,

I am just snoopy. I always look in the background of photos. Just like if I got in that shed I would be looking around at all the treasures.

I ate breakfast in a place somewhere East of Custer State Park af few years ago and there was a barbed wire display on the wall. Many various kinds. I do believe here was one very similar to what you have. Maybe not exact, but for sure along the same lines..

Ron

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Back in the 80's a friend of mine was a barb wire collector. At the time he had over 2000 different styles and varieties. Some of his pieces dated back to the 1870's. I think not only did they collect different kinds, but a lot had to do with where the wire came from. I know he had wire from some of the early ranches here in Texas like the King Ranch, XIT, 6666's and the Pitchfork. From the way he talked, each ranch had it's own style of wire that was made for them in the early days.

He died in 2001 and I don't know what became of his collection but I do know he donated some of the rare wire to the Ranching Heritage Center of Texas Tech in Lubbock.

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Ron,

I'm waiting for you to ask me about the lanterns above the 15 hp Case in the last photo I posted.... :ph34r:

Twostepin2001,

I didn't know that some of the old cow outfits had their own barbed wires? The Scutts, like Grandpa's, seems to be a common type for the early wires? It came up easily on Google and I remember researching it for Sharon's book in the late 1990s, and it wasn't hard to find information then. Gary ;)

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Gary, guess it didn't come across as I intended....lol Each ranch didn't have their own brand or type of wire. I think it was more important at least to Roger (the wire collector) where the wire had been used and on which ranch.

I remember one time probably in '88 or '89 there was a bunch of us riding our motorcycles and we was on US 82 which crosses the 6666's and Pitchfork ranches. There happened to be a fence crew building a new fence along side the highway. "Ol Roger grabbed the brakes on his Goldwing and made a U turn back to those cowboys. We all thought something was wrong so we turned around too. Roger was telling them he was a wire collector and wanted a piece of their wire. Before it was all said and done they was trying to give him a piece of a whole roll of barb wire.....lol Even though it was new wire, it meant something to Roger that it came off the 6666's.

Guy

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