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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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With movie sound effects you never know what they were trying to accomplish with the sound. Beyond that many locomotives have steam powered air compressors that will still be running wile the train is not moving.

Good answer Owen. The air compressors for the braking system were steam pumped and most locomotives also have a steam water pump as a means of getting water into the boiler, besides the injector. Some sounds are engineer or fireman produced as well. Normally a boiler blowdown was done after just starting to leave the station, but everything else is out off harm's way. Some stations had provisions for that operation in place.

And in movies, things can be supplemented. I've seen steam whistles or pop valves blow off steam, but no sound, Then when they want the whistle to sound, you hear it but don't sometimes see steam.

I don't know anything about how they rate horsepower of steam locomotives. They use the term, "Tractive effect" which has much to do with the number of driver wheels and overall weight of the locomotive.

To compare a 110 hp Case to the York 17... I don't know? A 110 hp Case was rated at 160 psi operating pressure from the factory. The original York engines probably operated at not much more than 100 psi? This new one likely operates near 200 psi, I'd guess and the large freight locomotives of yesteryear often operated in the 240-250 psi range. Steam turbine trains operated with around 600-700 psi. Pressure = horsepower in a well adjusted (valves set) steam engine. I still don't know how to compare the two engines. York 17 is no power house, compared to the locomotives of the steam freight era, but it is no slouch either. But a 110 hp Case is "no slouch" either! I'm putting a picture of Jack and Colin Beamish's 110 hp Case pulling 18-bottoms of moldboard plow. They were near 200 psi, as I recall Colin saying. Canada allows higher pressure of these engines, properly inspected.

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Did I make any sense, twostepn2001? It was my intention to do so. And, steam engines don't "idle" when not running. Gary ;)

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Don't know whether I might have posted these before. These were two different machines in my area around 1918. They were huge wooden self propelled hillside combines built by Holt in the early days. With a side mounted header they must have been a brute to drive.

This one belonged to a family I knew, especially the young boy on the operator's platform along with his mother. Near Uniontown, WA.

attachicon.gifWelle Brothers.jpg

This one was near Moscow, Idaho and shows early though familiar misfortune in those days. You can see the simple steering rack and the single drive track on the right side of the machine. Ran into a fellow last week that said this was in his family.

attachicon.gifupset Holt Self Propelled Combine_1918.jpg

Gary sent me a picture of such a machine some time ago that gives a better overall view of it, but I can't locate it at the moment.

Greg,

With the crud, I was going through some old files and found this picture of a Holt self propelled combine. It may not have been the one you were looking for, but it is one! Gary ;)

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No Gary, it's not the one I was looking for....it's better! Thank you.

This photo is a companion to the two that I already have. A different angle and shows more of the header side of the machine. I'm wondering where you might have found it.

A while back there was evidently a prolific local photographer around here that took a lot of local shots of buildings and events over the years. I believe he was associated with the nearby University of Idaho which is just a few miles across the state line from me. When he died his collection fell to the University and they eventually put it online. That's where I found my two pics.

I am told that there are still the remains of one of these machines lying rotting out of sight up a ravine somewhere near here, but I haven't been able to check it out.

The people shown were of a local family name that has sort of died out around here, though the bloodline still exists in offspring of different names. The young boy on the machine I knew as an older man who had become sort of a local entrepreneur, farmer and businessman. My sisters went to school with his daughters.

By the way, the last picture that you provided me here was the one I was originally looking for. Thanks

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Gary & Owen,

Thanks for your steam answers. I've always been fascinated by steam power but never had the oppurtunity to be around it much. When I was real small, before school age, the farm we lived on was next to a steam powered cotton compress. Always knew when it was noon and 12:30p cause they blew the whistle...lol

In the mid 80's, there was a man in Slaton, Tx. that had a Case steam tractor. Only time I ever got to see it in operation was at a tractor show in Lubbock. Somebody told me he had passed on and I don't know what happened to the tractor.

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Interesting info on the steam trains------and that they had "steam powered" air brakes. (just never thought much about it)

Wonder when the air brakes were implemented on the trains???

DD

Anson,

A steam powered compressor pumped the air for the train's air braking system. Air brakes go back quite a ways, but I don't have a date. Someone will look it up on the internet and let us two old guys know! Gary ;)

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Interesting info on the steam trains------and that they had "steam powered" air brakes. (just never thought much about it)

Wonder when the air brakes were implemented on the trains???

DD

Anson,

A steam powered compressor pumped the air for the train's air braking system. Air brakes go back quite a ways, but I don't have a date. Someone will look it up on the internet and let us two old guys know! Gary ;)

Here's WAY more than you wanted to know about air brakes......

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railway_air_brake

Mike

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Here's a couple of items about the engines on the American Queen.

This may make more sense to some of you guys...

attachicon.gifIMG_0001.jpg

attachicon.gifIMG_0002.jpg

Enjoy.

(still workin on the video thing)

Mike

mikem,

This was interesting and I'd missed this post! Thanks for posting it. I sure didn't realize they'd used a "used" engine in that steamboat. I sure understand it though. It all makes perfect sense.

This 40hp Gaar Scott engine I'm shown in the seat of at Forest City, Iowa, is a traction engine example of that same type of engine. Horizontal. Tandem compound. Double connecting rod, making four cylinders. Larger are the low pressure and smaller are the high pressure cylinders. I never hear these related to as "steeple compound'' but it is in actuality that. Gary ;)

post-5643-0-98190200-1380218727_thumb.jp

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Interesting info on the steam trains------and that they had "steam powered" air brakes. (just never thought much about it)

Wonder when the air brakes were implemented on the trains???

DD

Anson,

A steam powered compressor pumped the air for the train's air braking system. Air brakes go back quite a ways, but I don't have a date. Someone will look it up on the internet and let us two old guys know! Gary ;)

Anson,

1868... Like I said it went back quite a ways! I should have associated Westinghouse with it, but forgot. Gary :(

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Mikem-----

Thanks for the report on the Americam Queen engines-------I didn't realize that the paddle wheel was actually still driven by a steam engine-----let alone the history of the engine.

Rosedale, Mississippi is just upriver from Greenville-------Bolivar County must have used the dredge for further development of the Rosedale port facility. (live and learn!!!)

DD

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Another A Q update....

I was having my first cup of coffee on the 'Front Porch', in Davenport, when I see this.

post-5016-0-81607600-1380254590_thumb.jp

The pickup that you can just see on the left side of the pic, brought all the hoses, and catch cans they are using here. They pumped out the first truck, and about 3 minutes after it left, up rolled number 2......then number 3, ....and then number 4! (All identical) When they were done, they rolled up the hoses, picked up the drip cans, and you couldn't even tell they had been there. I wonder how many truck loads it would have taken if we had been going UP stream??

In the upper right corner of the picture, they are unloading a whole semi load of food. This took a lot longer than the 4 tankers of fuel did. They also made a bigger mess when they dropped a large bag of soft ice cream mix. :o That's what the white stuff they are standing in, is.

Mike

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Another A Q update....

I was having my first cup of coffee on the 'Front Porch', in Davenport, when I see this.

attachicon.gifRiverboat Vacation 003.JPG

The pickup that you can just see on the left side of the pic, brought all the hoses, and catch cans they are using here. They pumped out the first truck, and about 3 minutes after it left, up rolled number 2......then number 3, ....and then number 4! (All identical) When they were done, they rolled up the hoses, picked up the drip cans, and you couldn't even tell they had been there. I wonder how many truck loads it would have taken if we had been going UP stream??

In the upper right corner of the picture, they are unloading a whole semi load of food. This took a lot longer than the 4 tankers of fuel did. They also made a bigger mess when they dropped a large bag of soft ice cream mix. :o That's what the white stuff they are standing in, is.

Mike

Probably as entertaining as watch the ground crew when waiting for your plane to leave. Need MI fuel tankers to fill that ship (is it a ship?) they haul about 14,000 gallons.

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Another A Q update....

I was having my first cup of coffee on the 'Front Porch', in Davenport, when I see this.

attachicon.gifRiverboat Vacation 003.JPG

The pickup that you can just see on the left side of the pic, brought all the hoses, and catch cans they are using here. They pumped out the first truck, and about 3 minutes after it left, up rolled number 2......then number 3, ....and then number 4! (All identical) When they were done, they rolled up the hoses, picked up the drip cans, and you couldn't even tell they had been there. I wonder how many truck loads it would have taken if we had been going UP stream??

In the upper right corner of the picture, they are unloading a whole semi load of food. This took a lot longer than the 4 tankers of fuel did. They also made a bigger mess when they dropped a large bag of soft ice cream mix. :o That's what the white stuff they are standing in, is.

Mike

Probably as entertaining as watch the ground crew when waiting for your plane to leave. Need MI fuel tankers to fill that ship (is it a ship?) they haul about 14,000 gallons.

Actually, anything on the river is technically a boat. (I learned that on the trip too ;)) .

Mike

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Another A Q update....

I was having my first cup of coffee on the 'Front Porch', in Davenport, when I see this.

attachicon.gifRiverboat Vacation 003.JPG

The pickup that you can just see on the left side of the pic, brought all the hoses, and catch cans they are using here. They pumped out the first truck, and about 3 minutes after it left, up rolled number 2......then number 3, ....and then number 4! (All identical) When they were done, they rolled up the hoses, picked up the drip cans, and you couldn't even tell they had been there. I wonder how many truck loads it would have taken if we had been going UP stream??

In the upper right corner of the picture, they are unloading a whole semi load of food. This took a lot longer than the 4 tankers of fuel did. They also made a bigger mess when they dropped a large bag of soft ice cream mix. :o That's what the white stuff they are standing in, is.

Mike

Probably as entertaining as watch the ground crew when waiting for your plane to leave. Need MI fuel tankers to fill that ship (is it a ship?) they haul about 14,000 gallons.

Actually, anything on the river is technically a boat. (I learned that on the trip too ;)) .

Mike

Thanks Mike! I wasnt sure of what to call it.

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Mike,

I never knew the difference of what to call a steamboat or a steamship. I guess this is a steamboat then! Gary ;)

post-5643-0-37378700-1380294641_thumb.jp

Edit: You can sure tell these people are anticipating a photograph of themselves. If I owned this little steam launch, I'd be grinning from ear to ear. And if Anson was in there with me, he'd be yankin' on that whistle chain!

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Boat or Ship;-----Ship or Boat?????

My son works with an off shore geo-physical company------ironically they refer to their "ships" as "boats".

Several years ago-----he was home and eating lunch at the local resturant where all of the farmers were cussing and discussing the price of diesel. One of the boys had just bought a tanker load of fuel--------and commented that he would hate to see the fuel bill on Reb's "boat".

The next question was: so------how many gallons to fill it up????? Answer was: 898,000 gallons-----and it burns approx 7,000 gal in 24 hrs

So------it most probably qualifies as a ship!!!

(interesting------they calculate their fuel in lbs/tons; but are always converting back to gallons)

DD

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and it burns approx 7,000 gal in 24 hrs

So------it most probably qualifies as a ship!!!

(interesting------they calculate their fuel in lbs/tons; but are always converting back to gallons)

DD

Sounds like our hybrid system here where the price of fuel is per litre but old farmers like myself still figure in gallons per hour of fuel consumption. I guess it all boils down to the amount of work done or distance travelled per gallon(or per litre)

Not that it is particularly related to the subject but I had this photo of an IH dealership at Leamington, Ontario that I wanted to post here since it has so much IH equipment in it.

post-90-0-25904000-1380378685_thumb.jpg

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Been along time since I have seen the aircraft tires/rims utilized. Used to see alot of WWII surplus used back in the '50s------those tires lasted forever.

I've got two complete with rims stacked on top of the Loadstar/roll back------came off of a Baker Plow (reversible pan plow----manufactured in Plainview, Texas).

DD

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Been along time since I have seen the aircraft tires/rims utilized. Used to see alot of WWII surplus used back in the '50s------those tires lasted forever.

I've got two complete with rims stacked on top of the Loadstar/roll back------came off of a Baker Plow (reversible pan plow----manufactured in Plainview, Texas).

DD

Anson,

I remember after WWII, there were probably a half dozen Massey-Harris 21 self propelled combines within 10 miles of us and almost every one of them had WWII "bomber" tires on them for floatation. Otherwise the Massey had only single wheels and narrow tires as on my father in-law's 21 "Harvest Brigade" Massey-Harris in the first photo.

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(2nd photo) While I knew Lynn Simpson and his daughter, whose now my wife of 50+ years, I also do remember this event. It was on the front page of the Lewistown Daily Newspaper. They'd gone looking for anyone harvesting during the Fergus County Fair and he was, so was chosen "their first" candidate for the cover page. Sharon and I'd met four years before this picture was taken, so I was no stranger. After I'd started dating, then married Sharon in 1963, he still had this 21 combine for a few more years and I did get (have?? :o ) to run it a few times, before he traded it for a Massey-Harris 90 Special, just a few posts back. Gary ;)

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Borrowing a couple of pictures a gentleman on SmokStak wanted to share. The first is of Rumely Oilpull #1 (purportedly SN 101) at the Ohio Fair.

post-5643-0-56667000-1380485032_thumb.jp

This is a picture from my files of Kerosene Annie #1, the first of two prototypes built by the Advance-Rumely Company, predecessor of the famed Rumely Oilpull.

post-5643-0-11444700-1380485374_thumb.jp

This is a picture he posted of a Happy Farmer (by LaCrosse) tractor also at the Ohio Fair.

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This is a picture of son Mike plowing at Belgrade years ago with a 1918 Happy Farmer at Belgrade, Montana years ago. Gary ;)

post-5643-0-28299400-1380485286_thumb.jp

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A Happy Farmer tractor is on my veeery long wish list. Very long.

Last evening a scene jumped in front of my camera that is not a tractor, not in Montana, not anything like that at all. It is simply intended to start off the week on a calm and relaxed note.

Charlie

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