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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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Built in the year 1875. Soon to be abandon and torn down. A piece of local history will disappear. I worked with a guy who hung out on this one when he was young. His advise was to run like HE double toothpicks when a train was coming.

Charlie

Great views from the old trestles. I have a few photos looking down from ours, not the wooden version as it was filled with earth some 30 years before I was on the scene.

It may take a while to find though as I am putting in most of my time at harvest these days. Not going very fast or very far but still putting in the time.

A photo from today, the old Loadstar in it's 29th year of service on this farm, coming in for another load of oats.

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Wdeturck----

I got up late absolutely dragging this morning----choked down the morning medicine and checked out this thread:

You have made my day-------fell out laughing at the big "combination unit"-------and then the sound of the whistle randomingly blows!!!!!!

I feel better already------gotta go back and listen to the whistle some more!!!!!

DD

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Here's a link to a recording of the whistle on the American Queen.

http://www.steamboats.org/whistle-calliope/american-queen-steam-whistle.html

(Click on the MP3 symbol at the top)

I tried to get a recording of it live with my phone, but the wimpy phone would run and hide whenever the whistle blew.

This is a picture of a couple of fishermen that drifted into the center of the channel, and didn't see, or hear, us coming.

How they missed hearing the whistle, that was getting a SERIOUS work out, is beyond me.

The Queen was out of the channel, and stirring up serious mud, by the time it was over.

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Pretty exciting for the passengers, but according to the crew members I talked to later, it happens more than you would think.

Mike

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Thanks for the whistle link-------------and the link "steamboat.org" noted on the left side which includes numerous steamboat whistle sounds.

Most likely the sound of the American Queen was drowned out by the roar and rumble of empty Budweiser cans hitting the floor of the fishing boat!!!!!!

Never have spent much time fishing----------but have experienced the empty can sound from landside. LOL

Glad ya'll had a good trip-----looking forward to more pictures.

DD

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Well, the girls have returned home, as I just got calls they both made it. Farmall Kid (Mike) and Pam may recover. A little more sleep than I've been getting will help me out. Mike and I agreed a lot of the work we did to get ready for the weekend, needed to be done. We just hadn't figured in the time frame to get it all accomplished. When I had my 70th birthday in August, the kids couldn't all come. This time everyone but one granddaughter and a granddaughter in-law were able to make it from our family, and my late brother Bill's family all made it but his daughter. I've got to get some pictures sized for here. It looks like you all did okay in my absence.

I got some pictures to post just to fill space. This first one is of a neat old, old upright boilered, steam powered boat. Ever since watching Bogie in African Queen a few years ago, I've been fascinated with them.

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This Reeves engine and threshing machine sure made a mess of the "Jim River Bridge." Maybe one of you have heard of the Jim River??

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This picture is of a 32 hp Reeves cross compound engine pulling a Reeves steam lift plow, and with the water wagon there, appears to have taken on water. Gary ;)

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A few of the sights at my 70th belated birthday party at Silver Creek. I think about 40 people showed up, mostly family and a few from our church. Our daughter Michaelle decorated the shop tables.

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Grandson Maverik is keeping an eye on the Case for uncle Mike.

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Some road confusion in front of the shop later. Gary ;)

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Gary, it looks like your 70th birthday will be a memorable one.

I have been a little busy harvesting but before I forget, I wanted to post this old IHC dealership photo from the early days at Yorkton, Sask. No doubt some others who know them better than I do will i.d. those tractors.

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Gary, it looks like your 70th birthday will be a memorable one.

I have been a little busy harvesting but before I forget, I wanted to post this old IHC dealership photo from the early days at Yorkton, Sask. No doubt some others who know them better than I do will i.d. those tractors.

Now that pic goes all the way back to the roots of IH!! Thanks for posting it. Come to think of it, you should put this pic in that other thread about pics of old IH dealerships too.

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Anson,

I got the works. I don't remember a finer birthday, even if it was one month late. It was done up royal.

Ralph,

That's a phenomenal photo of that International Harvester dealership at Yorkton. I could look up those IHC tractors in my 150 Years of International Harvester book, but I'll bet ol' Roger can name them from the top of his head?? They ARE IHC however!

twostepn2001,

You are correct... that picture should be over on the IH Dealerships thread. It's great!

A couple more steam photos, since I have nothing else and am waiting to go to a doctor this morning.

The first is an extremely rare 34 hp Northwest (Stillwater, Minnesota, Roger!) cross compound on the belt threshing.

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This second one is of a 40 hp Advance cross compound engine pulling a Reeves steam lift plow in North Dakota. Gary ;)

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Well, the girls have returned home, as I just got calls they both made it. Farmall Kid (Mike) and Pam may recover. A little more sleep than I've been getting will help me out. Mike and I agreed a lot of the work we did to get ready for the weekend, needed to be done. We just hadn't figured in the time frame to get it all accomplished. When I had my 70th birthday in August, the kids couldn't all come. This time everyone but one granddaughter and a granddaughter in-law were able to make it from our family, and my late brother Bill's family all made it but his daughter. I've got to get some pictures sized for here. It looks like you all did okay in my absence.

I got some pictures to post just to fill space. This first one is of a neat old, old upright boilered, steam powered boat. Ever since watching Bogie in African Queen a few years ago, I've been fascinated with them.

attachicon.gifWhere I want to be red.jpg

This Reeves engine and threshing machine sure made a mess of the "Jim River Bridge." Maybe one of you have heard of the Jim River??

attachicon.gifReeves separator and prob Reeves engine through Jim River bridge- red.jpg

This picture is of a 32 hp Reeves cross compound engine pulling a Reeves steam lift plow, and with the water wagon there, appears to have taken on water. Gary ;)

attachicon.gifReeves 32hp engine,steam plow, water wagon red.jpg

Here's a link to an article about the 'James' river that flows through North and South Dakota:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_River_(Dakotas)

Locally, everyone refers to it as the "Jim" river.

The scenery in the background fits the local, but I've never seen that bridge. (I would assume it would have been repaired and not replaced.)

Mike

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Seeing the big steamer that broke down the bridge made me laugh remembering all of the bridges that my dad's TD-24 left in shambles.

He did some outside construction work and land clearing-------moving the equipment with a WWII surplus tank retriever as the lowboy. The 24 weighed 50,000----plus the tank retriever lowboy musta weighed another 20,000 lbs. Plus-----a couple of heavily weighted Farmall M's hitched together as the "prime mover".

Those little bridges had to go------luckily no-one was ever hurt and I never heard of him having to pay for damages. The farmers he was working for were all glad to get the bridges updated----and most all major players in the local county goverments.

The 24 was originally purchased for contract work with one of the pipelines that crossed the River right here by us. The contract ended in Buffalo, New York. They shipped the tractor home on a flat car-------worn to the bone. Daddy rebuilt her and put it back to work-----+using it on the farm when not working elswhere.

Big power for early 1950's.

DD

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Well, I don't know how this is going to work out, as I'm having a heck of a time with sizing pictures and photobucket this morning. Yesterday, I cranked up the TD-40 to go plowing across Silver Creek. Mike took the 1936 McCormick-Deering TD-40 TracTracTor plowing with our old steel wheel McCormick-Deering 4-bottom plow. This plow is no load for the TD40. It would pull it (breaking sod) in 5th gear or "road gear." It was only smoking in the photo as this was when he took off in 5th gear. It soon quit. This IS an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm. Gary ;)

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http://s228.photobucket.com/user/20_Highwheeler/media/Pawcranks1936TD-40TracTracTor.mp4.html

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http://s228.photobucket.com/user/20_Highwheeler/media/MikeplowingwithTD-409-16-13.mp4.html

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Looks like you wound the springs up pretty good there, Gary. That is man's work for sure.

Here is a hard to believe video that I came across. I think it may have been edited to add some wrinkles. It just does not seem steel would curl that way. What do the railroad experts have to say about it. ???????????

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUCU2GhG8zE

Charlie

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Charlie,

That's one mean railroad track in your youtube. I thought the Milwaukee RR "deferred maintenance" tracks were bad past the ranch in the late 1970s.

Maybe Roger can straighten this picture out? A postcard and photo collector for decades in ND sold this to a friend, calling it an "IHC 45 Mogul" tractor pulling this plow. I looked at those "chicken track" grouters and said to myself, "that's a Flour City." It's a neat old postcard, regardless. Gary ;)

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EDIT: My apologies and my lack of knowledge. I see the IHC on the tool box behind the right fender. DUH!!

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Its late at night after another longish day in the wheat field so I am just posting a photo from today to show I was actually working. Standing up on the ladder watching to see the bin fill and make sure not a bit of space is wasted. The crops are yielding pretty well this year so bin space is at a premium. Rain in the forecast for tomorrow so the combine gets a break,.

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Ralph,

That's a great photo of your harvest yesterday. It appears you just added grain to the truck which was already dumping into the auger? I'm glad your crops are running well. I know from personal experience that it is much more exciting to harvest a good crop than a mediocre one.

I don't know one thing and am not going to Silver Creek today. I normally don't go out there on Tuesday, but did yesterday, as the return diesel line on the TD-40 sprung a little leak when we were plowing on Monday. I manufactured a new line for it and put the diesel we had to drain out into a barrel, back into the fuel tank, so it's ready to go again. It's amazing how those 77 year old rubber hoses get brittle and crack. We're not near any McCormick-Deering agency to see if it was still under warranty? I just fronted it myself.

I don't remember who sent me this picture or anything about it? It was a railroad picture taken in 1918 in Great Falls. I don't know if it was Great Northern or Milwaukee? The old engine still had a "D" valve atop the cylinder which was about the end of that practice. Apparently this was near, or IN, the roundhouse, anyway. Gary ;)

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I just got off of an hour and a half chat with Ganesh, technician for Adobe Photoshop Elements 11. We were able to get my photo resizing working somewhat again. This is a photo I wanted to place here Monday evening, to no avail. We are having cold weather here and cloudy, damp weather. When all of this clears out, I hope to clean, sand, prime and paint the old girl its original gray color, so I can put on the new decals I got from "MB Cat." John Wyeth was great to work with regarding the decals. We had several emails back and forth, getting his designs as close to original as possible. I hope all of that information didn't get lost with his demise? At least, I got the ones I needed. Gary ;)

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OBG, perhaps I have missed a previous explanation, but what is a "D" valve?

Thanks

Art

Art From DeLeon,

My apologies for leaving you hanging on this subject of "D" valves. Most of the earlier locomotives all had a flat valve cover on their steam chest, atop the piston and cylinder. They signified, normally, a "D" valve. I'll place a photo of a newer steam locomotive and notice the round top above the piston and cylinder. This signifies that it is a later locomotive with a piston type valve. The piston valve is a balanced valve, in that it isn't subject to pressure against the case, only controlling the steam pressure headed into the cylinder on each end.

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This is the standard "D" valve used on locomotives and this one also from a traction engine. It gets the "D" name from its shape when pressed against the valve face of the cylinder entry. Notice the "D" portion slides back and forth on the surface of the valve chamber inside the steam chest. That constant sliding, and especially under high pressure, makes the valve harder to move back and forth, which also causes constant wear, in spite of steam oil for lubrication. They are very common, but weren't as efficient on locomotives and traction engines. Builders of both, locomotives and traction engines, often used the favored, later piston valve.

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This is a piston valve from a Peerless steam engine. Steam enters all 360 degrees of the cage, so the "balanced" part means that it doesn't work back & forth, being pressed against a housing. It more or less "floats" inside its cage. Several companies used these types and I've ran a couple of Reeves engines with piston valves, and my late friend Austin Monk's Peerless that had this identical valve. This Peerless valve was so efficient, it didn't even have "rings" to seal the piston to the cage.

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This is another style of valve gear, which also claimed to be balanced. I've only worked on one of these Gould valves and I don't know much other than that. At Belgrade we operated an undermounted Avery that had two of these, and one I worked on. They had a "half-ring", as a half piston would. A 75 hp J.I. Case also had an optional Gould valve installed. They seemed to be great valves.

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Probably more than you wanted to know, but you all know I can't tell you what time it is, when I can build you a clock!! -_- Gary ;)

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