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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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Gary,

I can't say for sure, but I think it is the small one. I have a couple of those that I use to gather apples, but they are about worn out. Then I suppose I will have to go to a plastic laundry basket. YUCK!

I was a little older than you when the horses went away, but not by much. I may have been seven. Old Queenie died and that left Jack. He did not constitute a "team", so out to pasture he went. He lasted several more years in retirement. Both horses just died of old age. I never did harness or work them, but did ride the hayrack behind them many times. They went after hay or straw from the stacks when the weather was too cold to get a tractor to start. They also hauled ensilage from the silo to the feedlot for the fat cattle when it was too cold to start a tractor. I think I am glad I missed the work part and got to enjoy the watching part.

Ron

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Even Wrangler can't help with the "horse gear" question-------saying his ancestors specialized in running the mail and out-running trains, sheriff's posses, etc.-------- (he did say that farming was a hard way to make a living--------that harvesting the trains was alot more lucrative).

Glad to see "Updraft" back in the conversation.

DD

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I have no clue on identifying most horse harness equipment (although I still have some here) leftover from the old days.

Charlie, good to see you are up and commenting again.

Just waiting now on that rain storm that passed through Gary's country to hit here.

This video is a little "off color" being my green John Deere swather. shot yesterday finishing up my last field of canola. Just imagine it is red. Macdon built the same swather for JD and IH only changing paint and decals.

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Ralph: I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but something is loose in your knife-drive. It will be easy to spot sometime soon. I hope you finish before the swather does. CardaleBob

I thought the same as soon as I heard it on the video. I have checked over the knife drive pretty close and can not find any play except a little in the sliding pto shaft. Wobble box and knife head bearing seems tight. I notice the rattle stays the same no matter if it is cutting or running empty. I think this swather has made that noise for a long time and will likely continue to.

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When it gets quiet Ralph, then you will know what to fix. The knocking is likely amplified by the location of the microphone. Nice video, as usual.

Ron

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Even Wrangler can't help with the "horse gear" question-------saying his ancestors specialized in running the mail and out-running trains, sheriff's posses, etc.-------- (he did say that farming was a hard way to make a living--------that harvesting the trains was alot more lucrative).

Glad to see "Updraft" back in the conversation.

DD

Thank you for the nod, Anson and Ralph. Things are improving slowly. I was promised a Friday release, but then had a little setback as can happen. I had to do a little battle with the powers at the Hospital, but have spent the weekend here in my own home, without about forty extra pills a day that I do not need or want. Had to spring loose before all of the meds started giving me side effects so they could keep me another week or two to analyze those.

Charlie

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Owen, Ron & Charlie,

Thanks for those answers. Had I been taking an Ag College entrance exam, I'd have said that too, but wasn't positive... Obviously! Charlie, it is good to have you back onboard again. There seems to be some kind of link between our age and our health??

Ron, it sounds like you had a little more workhorse team experience than I had. I wouldn't have liked all of the work my dad did, but I would have liked to have that knowledge he had.

Anson, I could never put Wrangler in the category with these work horses. He was in a completely different line of "work" making him an exceptional "work" horse. Did he know Butch and Sundance, sometime after they left Montana??

Ralph,

Some things just seem to have an inherent knock. The IH 403 combine I had always had a knock in it. I took it apart and put in new bearings and bushings in the sickle drive. It didn't change a bit. It was always there.

I didn't do to much this weekend, so don't have much in the way of pictures. This first one is of my dad on the haystack and the Overshot stacker lifting a buck of hay up to him to spread with his pitchfork.

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This is a 25hp Reeves cross compound Canadian Special engine that was owned by a late pen and phone pal in Kentucky. It sold at auction and ended up at a Reeves museum near columbus, Indiana a couple of years ago. I have lots of video of it plowing on my friend's place.

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This last picture is one of my late father in-law, Lynn Simpson, and my 1256 and drills, taken about 1980. I have few pictures of the 1256 and this is one of the better ones. It would also constitute an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm! Gary ;)

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Looking forward to your trip report Mikem-----you will be riding in style!!!!

Have fun.

DD

Here's a "teaser" picture that will have to do till things get a little caught up-----

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The answer is--YES, I got to the engine room---Now I gotta figure out how to post videos.

Mike :D

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Here's a "teaser" picture that will have to do till things get a little caught up-----

The answer is--YES, I got to the engine room---Now I gotta figure out how to post videos.

Mike :D

That should be interesting Mike. Its an impressive looking boat.

I had to show off this vintage postcard I recently acquired showing our local railway trestle bridge across the creek before it was filled in the 1920s. It must have been quite a view looking down through all those timbers from the train. This one dates to pre 1912.

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Under most circumstances, heights don't bother me too much. But dang, I got the heebie jeebies just lookin' at the trestle!!! Just wonder how nervous the engineer was that took the very first train across?? :o

twostepn2001,

I too wouldn't want to look down, when heading across that trestle with a steam locomotive in my lap. Ralph, there's a lot of firewood in that trestle! :o

Here's another scenario that would make me uneasy. Being one of the inner locomotives as the Northern Pacific tests their new bridge across the Missouri River at Bismarck, in Dakota Territory, 1883.

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But... this is how the river crossing was done, before the bridge, as shown in this 1880 photo. Kind of an open ended steamboat, I guess. Gary ;)

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Gary,

That pic with all the locomotives on the bridge is really neat. I looked close and actually see guys sitting on top of the cabs posing for the picture.

I gotta say if I'd been there, I'd be on the river bank yellin' "Ya'll lookin' good! Don't hear no creakin' or crackin' yet! Keep goin'!!"

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About that creakin and crackin part, the first train from St Louis to Kansas City went near where I grew up in central Missouri. Hilly country with lots of river crossings and bridges. For the inaugural run they loaded up a bunch of dignitaries and such and took off with fanfare and hoopla. Didn't make it.

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Gary,

I have a train question for ya. I know that some steam locomotives set speed records and what not and some were capable of over a 100mph under certain conditions.

My question is: Have you ever heard of a steam powered freight train that ran over a 100mph on a daily basis in the US? I'm not talking about Amtrak or bullet trains. I'm talking about like in the 30's or 40's, maybe even into the 50's.

I don't have any money riding on a bet or anything, just curious.

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I would doubt if any freight train came anywhere close to that speed, mainly due to the fact that the cars in the consist belonged to any railroad out there, and who knew what kind of working condition the running gear was in on them, other than "the wheels turn, and the brakes work", kind of inspection, to get them out of the yard and on to their final destination.

Now, if the consist was made up of one type of car, say Pacific Fruit Express refrigerated (iced) cars, or some other dedicated shipment, perhaps they would be authorized to go a little faster.

I would think that the reason passenger trains were given higher speed limits is that the same railroad that owned the cars, owned the trackwork, and made sure that the mechanical condition of their cars was 'up to snuff'.

Also remember that the tonnage of a freight was much more than a passenger train, just by the sheer number of cars in the consist.

Good job Art! I couldn't say it any better. The tonnage in a freight train is a huge, huge factor. It takes an awful lot more locomotive to get that load moving and keep it moving over any grade along the way. Passenger trains are so light just about any locomotive could haul them. But in steam days, the driver wheels on the freight locomotive were smaller in diameter, just to gain power, which loses speed. Passenger locomotives generally had larger diameter driver wheels with speed in mind.

One of the old steam locomotive boys at Whitefish, MT years ago, when he and his co-workers were still living, they had certain freight locomotives that they "feathered" the Johnson bar (forward, reverse lever) to get the ultimate speed out of the locomotive on straight stretches. Certain ones, he reiterated, would start to "gallop" the locomotive, just from the excess speed the connecting rods were raising on their upward motion. He said, when it started to "gallop" they'd move the Johnson bar back "one notch."

Now, how a 100 mph passenger steam locomotive overcame that, I don't know, other than the distance from the crank pin on the driver was closer to the axle, in relationship, than on a freight locomotive, which had the crank pin located further out on the wheel. I've probably already said more than I know!

The Union Pacific Big Boy and its small appearing drivers, for power.

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Even the small size freight locomotives had to use small wheels and crank pins outward.

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This passenger locomotive at Whitefish, MT shows the tall wheels and crank pins located more inbound on their "crankshafts."

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The driver height and crank pin location is something likely many don't consider, but it is there and that is the principle difference (among a multitude of smaller factors) between the freight engines and passenger locomotives. Gary ;)

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Thanks Art and Gary for the replies. I saw a post on another forum about "100mph" freight trains and I figured it was BS but wasn't sure since I know little to nothing about trains, much less steamers.

One thing on my bucket list would be to ride in the cab of a train, even if just for a few miles. But probably never happen...lol

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Built in the year 1875. Soon to be abandon and torn down. A piece of local history will disappear. I worked with a guy who hung out on this one when he was young. His advise was to run like HE double toothpicks when a train was coming.

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Charlie

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I wonder how much computer assisted design went into the development of those trestles, and COULD our 'modern' engineers design anything better?

None and No.

Ron

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Both Gary. If the last article I read still holds true. a new one will or is being built some distance South of the old one. Upon completion of the new trestle the old one will be removed. There was some effort to save this one as a hiking trail but as far as I know there is not enough support to sway the Railroad.

http://thelcn.com/2013/02/24/decision-nears-of-fate-of-trestle/#sthash.WebwvQi2.dpbs

Charlie

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Not surprised. They are a big liability so to speak. Somebody fell off of a bridge over the Gasconade river in central MO and the bridge is now fenced off, at least on one side anyways. (I want to say old Rock Island line, but ???)Longer and lower, but apparently people can't be trusted to their own devices. <_<

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