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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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This picture shows Mose LaTray, builder of Lewistown's first post office in 1880, before Lewistown was a thought. It was at Reedsfort. When Grandpa Jäger homesteaded on Beaver Creek, this was his first post office. While in Billings 1970 - 74 as a car painter, I worked with Mose's great grandson at Billings Chrysler-Plymouth-Toyota Body Shop.

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The Cook & Reynolds real estate company was quite a thing years back. I've bumped onto several of their neat old photos. The original photo of this would be very nice as well. Lots of "shocks" (stooks) out there to thresh.

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I had to stop along the freeway and take this picture of Helena's "Sleeping Giant" on my way to Great Falls a couple of days ago. Gary ;)

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Looks like Mr. Cook has been in the land business a few years longer than old Delta Dirt.

Mississippi or Montana--------then or now; we both have alot in common. Looks like we have both been "along ways from NoWhere"-----and both deal with the world's most basic commodity.

"Beneath it all is the Land".

Gonna swipe that picture to hang on the wall Professor. (may have to get me a convertible for better viewing of the land!!!)

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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Delta Dirt,

That picture of Cook & Reynolds really fits you! You do need a convertible to go show the land from this picture that washed down Spring Creek, the Judith River, Missouri River and Mississippi River, that you now sell!

Here's an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm! Yesterday at Silver Creek, I gave Annie, our 1939 Farmall H, a bath! I'd never used Mike's new pressure washer with hot water. Wow, it works quite well and not nearly as vicious on the 74 year old tractor as the old steam cleaner was with tractors on the farm. (I know kids, I'm behind the learning curve, but I got to experience it before I checked out, so let the old guy have his grins!) Gary ;)

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A cousin's outfit near Pullman, WA. Cereal grains done, waiting on the garbonzo beans in background.

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A cousin's outfit near Pullman, WA. Cereal grains done, waiting on the garbonzo beans in background.

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Wow, the buck$ involved there. I was talking to Mike Tyler at Moore(Eddies corner) last week. They're running CIH combine with 45 foot header. When I started running a 123SP, that would have been four of them to get that width and I was worried about running a rock with that old pelter. Combining has changed a lot since that first IH self propelled combine!

In this picture of the 123SP, I was a little young to operate it yet. Me on the left, cousin James on the right. I still have that wooden handgun my big brother Bill made for me too. Gary ;)

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I believe those are just 30 foot headers on these machines. There is some experimenting with 45 foot flex draper headers around here but they just seem too much to manage in hilly country. Funny, we used to think 16 feet was the most we could get away with. Like you say Gary, things change.

Those are 8230 combines with Hillco levelers. Last I heard they likely amount up to about 3 1/2 million dollars. This is a family corporation, retired dad and five farming sons. Said to be the largest farming operation in the county.

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Greg,

That is very interesting about those combines. I'm not surprised they're not using the 45' headers, as the Tyler farm is very flat.

Ralph,

You got me going on this stuff and I hate that I never know what is going to end up here, as it looks like gibberish when I place it here from Photobucket. I do know you click on the blue writing, and not the photo! We were doing some shed/shop rearranging today at Silver Creek. I put the Model TT back into the shed, took Annie for a spin and had to put the Model T Coupe in a narrow spot beside Annie for the time being. This was me taking Annie, the 1939 Farmall H out for a short spin, before backing it into its new spot. And this REALLY makes for an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm!! Thanks for getting me to step out Ralph. While I still can't edit, I'll get that this winter!

http://s228.photobucket.com/user/20_Highwheeler/media/Annieampmeforalittlespin8-26-2013.mp4.html

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This was me moving the Model TT out of the shop and backing it into the shed where the Model T Coupe had spent the summer.

http://s228.photobucket.com/user/20_Highwheeler/media/1925ModelTTmovefromshoptoshed8-26-13.mp4.html

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This was a picture I took of the three things afterwards. Gary ;)

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Those videos turned out well Gary. That truck has a bit of a whine to the transmission that the mike picks up.

I think we need a camera that mounts on the visor of our caps though so we can use both hands to drive. You did ok though.

I've shot some more video on the weekend while moving almost everything in one shed to get the JD swather out. Haven't got the video edited yet so for now here is a re-run of driving the old "AR" a few years ago.

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OBG,

I found this about a year ago in a pasture on the way to a oil lease I hauled near San Angelo, Texas. I was told it was a 123SP. I took a few pics then saw bees swarming around so I left pretty quick. Didn't want to take a chance on them being the "mean" ones....lol

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OBG,

I found this about a year ago in a pasture on the way to a oil lease I hauled near San Angelo, Texas. I was told it was a 123SP. I took a few pics then saw bees swarming around so I left pretty quick. Didn't want to take a chance on them being the "mean" ones....lol

twostepn2001,

I'm no authority on the 123 SP, but I've spent lots of hours running one and listening to that green diamond engine until dark. They had dual driver wheels and the "narrow Farmall front axle" for their rear axle. I don't know about the lower grain tank and auger in your photo? Ours had the high grain tank and it dumped through a gate and chute. However, my uncle Audie had a 123 SP that he lowered the grain tank and added an unloading auger to, so this one could be like what Audie did, or it possibly was an option I'm unaware of?

Edit: That grain tank has been lowered, as it still has the tall elevator, to the height the grain tank used to be.

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Those videos turned out well Gary. That truck has a bit of a whine to the transmission that the mike picks up.

I think we need a camera that mounts on the visor of our caps though so we can use both hands to drive. You did ok though.

I've shot some more video on the weekend while moving almost everything in one shed to get the JD swather out. Haven't got the video edited yet so for now here is a re-run of driving the old "AR" a few years ago.

Ralph,

You spoke of my Model TT transmission whine, and that is in reverse. I've never figured out what caused that, but it has to transmit up front from the Columbia transmission in the rear driveline? That's not too bad for 1925, but did you hear the terrible miss in that John Deere engine?? :rolleyes: Gary ;)

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Here are some pics of the 503 combine that I told about over in the vintage ads thread. I don't remember exactly when it was bought, but just guessing maybe '62 or '63. Kinda odd I guess but even though the man Dad farmed for was a IH dealer, the combine they replaced with the 503 was a Gleaner A.

As you can tell the 503 is in pretty rough shape, I don't know how long it's been just sitting in the weeds. The front cab glass and some lights have been busted out by hail.

The dealer's son still farms the land and has kept just about all the equipment through the years, including two 560's my Dad used. There's also a later model 915 with a Wylie sunflower header on the same yard, along with a 6 row skip row planter and a 6 row crustbuster and a IH 504 Hi-Trac tractor with a flame culitivator attachment.

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Early self propelled combine posts brought back memories for me.

My dad had a 125SP------still have its carcass. Never was much of a combine for cutting soybeans-----I later cut the harvester mechanism off and mounted a winch and set of gin poles on it. Daddy pretty well parked the 125 once he acquired two 141s. Moving the engine up top was a major improvement.

Remembering the dust-----my dad was operating the old 125 one afternoon with a young black boy riding the platform with him. (we would ride along and jump off and run the rabbits down------60+ yrs ago------sure can't do it now) Dust was boiling-----Daddy sneezed and coughed his false teeth out over the steering wheel. Red reached out and caught the teeth before they fell into the header. We laughed about that for days!!!!

DD

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Interesting perspective on crop dusting in my area. Evidently near Colfax, Washington.

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Interesting perspective on crop dusting in my area. Evidently near Colfax, Washington.

That is some impressive video. An interesting view of a unique part of the world. I bet it is a whole different ball game from aerial spraying the flat lands of Sask.

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Greg,

That's neat, neat video and sure show us a great perspective of the "non-flatland" in the Palouse country! Sharon's late uncle Ira Simpson had a butcher shop at Colfax and I always wanted to get there to visit him., but never made it.

Ralph,

I thought of you when I snapped these pictures. This 1955 Pontiac Chieftain is really a neat, clean old car. The guy drives it frequently too.

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This 1950 Plymouth is driven daily by a construction worker at a project near our apartment. It apparently had an "owie" as it has some fresh paint on it. It must have been insurance work, as it certainly wasn't part of a restoration, or he'd have painted the whole thing. I just took this one on my phone yesterday morning. Gary ;)

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gary,

The 1955 Pontiac is very close to the 1956 Star Chief that I once owned and drove daily. Mine had color red where the yellow is in your photo. I bought the '56 with 55,000 miles on it and the "new style two coupling hydramatic " transmission defunct. It took a couple of tries to get the tranny back to good operating condition. Something like 9 or 18 clutch discs in that thing. Once working, I drove the car until it had 99,000 miles on it, then gave it up due to rust. If I went down a gravel road, the kids in the back seat would nearly be overcome with dust that leaked in through the trunk. The old girl would surpass a dollar bill for speed though.

Charlie

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Interesting perspective on crop dusting in my area. Evidently near Colfax, Washington.

That is some impressive video. An interesting view of a unique part of the world. I bet it is a whole different ball game from aerial spraying the flat lands of Sask.

Palouse, I'm thinking that dirt strip is on Hwy 27 north of Pullman. The strip is right along the road, I was riding south one day and the plane popped up over a hill, when it was taking off, and scared the crap out of me. It looked like it was gonna rip the windshield off Springer, and take my head with it. BK

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I was a kid in the late 60s and we had a Pontiac that may have been one of those Chieftains. White on green instead of yellow on white. Drive gear was out, only low and second.

We were pretty poor off and had to use the cheap gas in it. Eventually the carb bowl would pile up a lot of super fine sand in the bottom and it would stall out in the middle of town somewhere. I got to where I could pop it apart with the nail file in fingernail clippers. Pull out as much crud as possible and put it together, it would go on down the road. For many years I carried nail clippers because of that car.

It paid off one day in the Air Force in 1977. Driving a little Air Force Chevy flat bed cargo truck. Wouldn't idle, but seemed fairly okay at speed. Okay, you could live with that. Well, about 50 miles east of Tonopah NV, on a road that saw maybe 10 cars a day, it became plainly obvious it wasn't going to make it that last 50. It was over 100 degrees and I didn't want to walk, especially in combat boots. Stopped and pulled out the old clippers. Found a piece of crud in the needle causing it to flood :) It ran like a top after that. Drove onward to the Tonopah Test Range hoping to make it, watching that gauge go where no man wants to see it. Nursed it on as it got to spitting and sputtering, having to drive slower and slower as it struggled for fuel. It finally sputtered for the last time, coasted about 50 feet and stopped right at the gas pump.

And that is my Pontiac story.

Eventually got back to Nellis AFB. Motor pool guys said it had that problem for years but they just tolerated it as it never left the base and they didn't know what was wrong with it. Didn't bother them to issue it to me to take it out in the open desert though. Swell bunch of fellows.

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Ralph,

I thought of you when I snapped these pictures. This 1955 Pontiac Chieftain is really a neat, clean old car. The guy drives it frequently too.

This 1950 Plymouth is driven daily by a construction worker at a project near our apartment. It apparently had an "owie" as it has some fresh paint on it. It must have been insurance work, as it certainly wasn't part of a restoration, or he'd have painted the whole thing. I just took this one on my phone yesterday morning. Gary ;)

Gary, that is great to see those old fifties cars being driven and enjoyed. I'd trade my Chevy II for that Chieftain I think. Co-incidentally , I was looking at this 53 Chieftain for sale locally on kijijji. If it was a two door with power glide I might be going for it.

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