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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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Cario gunship continued----------

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(note the iron cladding----------appears to be smaller gauge railroad iron mounted in a slat fashion)

Cannons, engines, and the rotted/deteriorated hull were all recovered from the wreck------along with numerous personal effects---------as well as the ship's brass bell. The "fresh super structure" (laminated beams) that you see up top was fabricated for display purposes.

And------------another eagle (don't look like a buzzard to me!!!!). This one from atop the Illinois monument---------looks like he is looking for his old buddy "Old Abe". Sorta thought I heard him squak out an acknowledgment to the eagle that rides with me on my belt attached to my old Marine Corps emblem (eagle, golbe, and anchor).

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The Illinois monument is the largest structure on the battlefield--------huge.

In studying pictures of the Illinois 2nd Calvary roster plaque inside the monument----------I found my great grandfather along with two uncles (from my dad's mother's side of the family). They were from the Monmouth-----Roseville, Illinois area if anybody here happens to be from up in that area------give me a holler. And---------I am sure I had plenty of my mother's relatives giving these ol' boys plenty of he!!! from a hilltop somewhere closeby.

The video at the museum stated that 20,000 troops died in the battle for Vicksburg-------that's a sobering thought no matter which side you were on.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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Oh------I forgot; but was gonna ask Roger and the Professor how one of these engines would compare to one of the big traction engines.

Never saw anything on speed-----but looks like the Cario might have been fast for its day. Carried lots of weight-------but somewhere it stated that it operated with a 6 ft draft----relatively shallow.

DD

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Great story/posts Anson, it would be great to see that someday. I remember reading the story on how they found that ship, but never saw how or where it ended up. I am surprised to see the boiler pressure, 140psi is pretty high for that period of history. Most railroad locomotives at that time were only running in the 100-125psi pressure range.

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Great story/posts Anson, it would be great to see that someday. I remember reading the story on how they found that ship, but never saw how or where it ended up. I am surprised to see the boiler pressure, 140psi is pretty high for that period of history. Most railroad locomotives at that time were only running in the 100-125psi pressure range.

Anson,

I agree with Roger. They must have really pushed the envelope when building those boilers, to get the operating pressure up to 140. My Case, built in 1909, only operated at 130 psi, and boiler construction had gone through a lot of "trial and error" getting to that point, at that late date! Another thing that took my fancy was they listed the coal consumption ALSO in "bushels." There may have been a farm boy in the scenario somewhere, there?

Those cylinders, compared to a farm engine, are huge. Humongous? Ginormous? The long stroke is common on anything with paddle wheels, but the bore is larger than I'm used to seeing on this type of vessel. It'd get out and go, even with all of the weight, I'll bet. Whomever touched off the shot that sank her, had to have "celebratory thoughts?"

I so admire efforts to recover things like this from buried mud and even now hardened dirt. I know of one other steamboat that was found and recovered in dry dirt, after riverbed changes over a century+.

It's always amusing to see the hole that sunk it, just like finding an old tractor in a junk pile from 1912, that has a connecting rod through the block or broken gearing that stopped her in her tracks. My late friend Max Tyler used to restore Caterpillars and amassed a huge collection of them at Moore(Eddies Corner), Montana. He said it was always amusing to find the thing that stopped the tractor when it last ran... maybe not always an easy fix, but amusing. Gary ;)

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I just made a post on SmokStak.com a few minutes ago. I'd gotten about 8 private messages from the administrator, having consternation over a couple of posts that were made there, and people had to get dirty minded or insulting in the last removals she's had to do. I thought it was time for some light hearted posting, which I try to accomplish. I can generally get about anyone to smile with my humor and wit (other than Roger!).

I was outside working on Mike & Randy's 20hp Reeves today and had to grab my camera. I think Mike thought of the humor in the pictures I took. While I was busy putting the Judson governor back onto the Reeves, and later spent a couple of hours re-doing the cylinder condensate drain cocks, which I'd installed wrong (Mistaken??) last winter, when the engine was still in the shed.

Mike made a quip about his free ranging chickens out of their pen today, saying: "What's with these Aultman & Taylor chickens, resting contentedly underneath the Reeves?" So I ran and got my camera. I took this front end picture of the Reeves, in case they got up and ran.

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Then I took another picture, since the chickens didn't run away. This time, the Case is back behind the Reeves, but no chickens under it, resting. We all know, don't we Anson, that chickens are deathly afraid of eagles... a natural predator of chickens.

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This is a logo that each Aultman & Taylor threshing machine had on each side: FATTENED ON AN AULTMAN & TAYLOR STRAWSTACK!

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This is uncle Frank and my dad pulling their Aultman & Taylor threshing machine with a 20hp Aultman & Taylor steam engine, over at the homestead. So we had an A&T threshing machine.

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That threshing machine met with death, at my Dad's hands. There was an Aultman & Taylor strawstack behind this A&T threshing machine being built for the chickens, but Dad burned it down (up??), circa 1919. He'd cleaned the ash pan on the 20hp Reeves Highwheeler steam engine pictured, and the wind switched and got strong before he could get water on them. Embers blew toward the strawstack and caught that Aultman & Taylor strawstack on fire. It doesn't appear as though the thresher was ruined, but it was. He'd neglected to leave a long chain hooked to the tongue of the thresher, which was a smart practice of some engine men, just for pulling the thresher away from a burning strawstack. He tried to back the thresher out with the engine in reverse, but it either threw or broke the drive belt, I don't remember which; since the rear wheels are dug into a hole on threshing machines when threshing. That is done so you can really back into the belt, without moving it when getting ready to thresh. You can see where someone started a tractor (their 30-60 Aultman & Taylor?) and plowed a swath in the stubble. Enough of that sad story that put a stop to their threshing until they could procure another new wooden Aultman & Taylor threshing machine. Costly mistake... Right in the middle of harvest. Well, actually this whole paragraph had nothing to do with my story, other than it removed a nice A&T strawstack for these chickens; and a nice A&T thresher for Dad and his brothers.

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Anyway, I posted the two pictures at the top and the one of Dad and uncle Frank pulling the A&T threshing machine over on SmokStak, just to raise some eyebrows (and likely some blood pressure??) Gary :)

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I just made a post on SmokStak.com a few minutes ago.

That threshing machine met with death, at my Dad's hands. There was an Aultman & Taylor strawstack behind this A&T threshing machine being built for the chickens, but Dad burned it down (up??), circa 1919.) Gary :)

I haven't been on smokstak in ages so I don't know what goes on there. Seeing the mention of the Aultman Taylor thresher burning reminds me of my grandparents similar (27 inch) thresher that burned down in a stubble fire the first year they had it (1910). They had to replace both the thresher and the IH Famous engine which was a major expense for homesteaders just in the first years of building up their farms. Lucky the cost was shared by the six members of the threshing syndicate.

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Ralph,

I never tire of seeing that photo of your family threshing. The more I examine it, Grandpa Yaeger bought his Aultman & Taylor thresher in 1910 as well, and they BOTH burned during harvest. Dad used to agonize recalling that incident. Knowing his brothers like I did, I know he took a lot of verbal abuse over that incident.

Another incident he took abuse over and probably deserved it as well: On that same 20hp Reeves Highwheeler, he was threshing away and maybe should have known the horses or watched the pressure gauge closer, but as the water wagon was pulling up alongside the Reeves, the pop valve blew off steam, making the horses "run away." Now, a water wagon full of water isn't a light load. I believe theirs held 8-barrels of water and that would be an additional (roughly) ton and a half of weight. But when the water boy/teamster got it stopped and back to the engine, Dad said he didn't spare any words cussing him out for letting that happen. I can sure understand the water boy, but being only human, there have been a few times that I didn't intend for the engine, under my care, to pop off, but I allowed it to happen anyway. And once it happens, you can't retract it. You just have to be "patient" for about a half-minute or more.

Here are some more Aultman & Taylor thresher pictures for today. This first one is of the Kersons Brothers and their three 25hp Aultman & Taylor steam engines and three Aultman & Taylor threshing machines (and Model T Fords!), the men and wives, from one of my Aultman & Taylor catalogs.

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This is an Aultman & Taylor steam engine and one of their threshing machines with a Garden City double feeder for "stack threshing."

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These are two more pictures of threshing on the farm homestead at Lewistown. The second one has one of their Model TT "dump trucks" backed up to the grain spout. Gary ;)

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I was going to ask what that wagon with the box on stilts was used for in your earlier post but your last picture answered that question.

13,500 posts on this thread? That's enough to keep a person busy reading for a while!

Owen,

You figured that old portable grain hopper on your own. It just allowed for wagons or trucks to come and go while they kept the threshing machine threshing.

I'd rather have a root canal in every tooth (just those that are left!) than be forced at gunpoint to have to read every post, even if in prison, salt mine chain gang, or a slave labor camp. Gary ;)

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Sharp eyes Owen-------reckon that was an early version of the grain cart.

So----we will have a new name for the grain cart. It shall now be known as the "Aaland Cart"!!!!

The grain carts are another piece of farm machinery that has changed rapidly in the last few yrs------most now being 800---1000 bu capacity.

DD

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Looks like a couple of the people in that picture didn't get the dress code memo for that day!?

What do you think the wheel mounted on the 2 poles is for?

Hi: That wheel mounted on the 2 poles looks like an old fashioned windless to me. I remember one in an old slaughter house that looked like that. A belt drove the large wheel from a small hand-cranked pulley at ground level. The horizontal bar was a round timber about 4 inches in diameter. A 3/4 inch rope was wound around this to do the lifting. A small boy could easily hoist a 1500 lb. carcass. A snatch block could be used to double the capacity. By substituting a steel pipe for the horizontal bar, and adding steel cable, this machine could do the lifting of heavy parts off the top of a steam engine.or threshing machine. CardaleBob.

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CardaleBob,

I'd noticed that windlass there in the past and didn't stop to think of what the Kersons used it for. It's hard to guess, without seeing it in use, but they obviously used it to lift something, not super heavy, but way heavier than a couple of guys would want to try to lift. Gary ;)

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I have nothing else to post tonight, I guess? After my Grandpa Jäger hired on with TC Power and worked on his steamboats for the years 1874-75 and 76, he stayed at Fort Benton(the world's innermost port) that winter, herding mules and hunting coyotes. In the spring of 1876 and through 1880, he was a freighter all over parts of Montana, including Virginia City, Helena and Diamond City and several US Army forts, strategically placed to guard against "hostiles." I've often wondered if he ever (he must have?!!) done the Whoop-up trail into Canada. One of his favorites had to be into the trail into the Judith Basin, including Ubet, Utica, Cottonwood, and Reeds Fort. Reeds Fort (also Reedsfort) was his first official post office in the Judith Basin, after he went to his homestead in May of 1881. Anyway, from what my dad told me, his dad drove horses, mules and oxen. I've always been fascinated by "jerkline" outfits. While I don't fully understand the workings of them, one line went to a lead horse that normally had bells on its collar and the rest of the horses or mules knew what that meant and followed accordingly. I've never driven horses, so why am I even trying to tell you guys anything?? I'm still fascinated by that method of hauling fright, long before hard rubber tire, chain drive trucks, and diesel semi's came along.

Charlie Russell painted a couple of oil paintings of this jerk line freighting. This is one.

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When Grandpa hired on, this would have been Power's central headquarters were before he moved his business empire to Helena. I keep checking Fort Benton pictures and haven't seen Grandpa yet, however I did find him in the 1880 US Census at Fort Benton.

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This is another jerk line freighting outfit at Fort Benton, at the Record building.

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Grandma Yaeger's cousin Joe Regli and Grandpa's neighbor, Robert Keller, are shown here jerk line freighting at Lewistown.

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Sandersons are shown freighting in Central Montana.

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Ubet was vying for the Fergus County Seat in 1886, but lost out to Lewistown, due to Lewistown's "Big Spring", purportedly the second largest fresh water spring in the USA, after Giant Springs at Great Falls, Montana. This was a freighting outfit in the Judith Basin near Ubet. He's also pulling a wagon that undoubtedly had a "kitchen" and with any distance, they all carried some grain for the animals at the end of the day. Gary ;)

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This was Charlie Russell's other freighting picture, this one of oxen, pulling the Diamond R wagons up out of the Missouri River bottom at Fort Benton.

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This was a jerk line mule outfit on Last Chance Gulch (Main Street) in my adopted home town of Helena.

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This was on the trail between Fort Benton and Helena in Prickly Pear Canyon, about 20 miles north of Helena.

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This is another of freighting on the flatlands, showing a large freighting outfit, likely Power, heading for Helena.

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This is a freight outfit at 5th and Broadway in Lewistown, at the Hickey Blacksmith Shop. My grandmother Hamilton's home was later moved onto that same property in the early 1950's.

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This is how the steamboat freight from St. Louis was "stored" at Fort Benton on the levee, during the busy, ice free months of summer and fall. This freight was destined for the gold mines of Virginia City, loaded on freight wagons and delivered by freighters or teamsters, bull whackers or mule skinners. Gary ;)

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Here is another pile of freight brought up river to Fort Benton(the world's innermost port), Montana Territory in 1879, while Grandpa was still there working for TC Power freighting.

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This is a bull train at Fort Benton by the Murphy and Neel Company. They were a competitor of TC Power & Brother.

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This is a bullwhacker and his bull train freighting near Fort Benton.

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In a dry year, if the Muddy Missouri was too low, the steamboats would sometimes unload their freight downstream at Cow Island, north of what is now Winifred, Montana. The freight was then hauled to Fort Benton by freighters.

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This was a advertizing poster that was likely put out at both St. Louis, MO, and Fort Benton, MT Territory, and likely even Helena where Power moved his headquarters and built his huge, huge mansion over on the west side of Last Chance Gulch, which still exists, but is no longer in his family. Gary ;)

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My "famous" horse Wrangler said that he would like a copy of those Charlie Russell paintings hanging in his barn--------even though he wasn't that familiar with the "jerk line freighters".

Going on to remind me that his great grandaddy "Tornado" (so named for the great cloud of dust created when he ran the mail) ran for the Pony Express-------a route further to the south than where Grampa Yaeger was freighting.

Reckon I will have to acomodate ol' Wrangler---------but first, I need to get the white woman's yard mowed. (she has her bull whacking whip out!!!)

Great photos and story Gary.

DD

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Hi: For sure great photos and stories of old time freighting. The logistics of the long teams and multiple wagons hooked together, versus 2 or 4 horse teams and many drivers must have resulted in increased profits. I can see that turning corners on the steep inclines was a real chore for the long outfits. Keep up the wonderful postings. CardaleBob.

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I don't have anything to post this morning, so I am going to also post this encore photo here again, of my late cousin Alvin, cousin Chuck and late brother Bill, the mowing crew in 1950. I'd just posted it on "Tractor of the Week" thread. Our Farmall Cub is at left, Alvin's Cub is behind and Chuck's Farmall M is at right. These ARE IH Tractors on a Montana Farm. Gary ;)

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I'm not sure but don't think I have posted this local history photo yet. It is supposedly taken at the Jewish colony east of here during threshing. An impressive straw pile from the thresher and what I am guessing is a McCormick Titan tractor powering it.

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Ralph, thanks for the great period photo of a 10-20 Titan :wub: at work . The short/narrow back fenders would indicate that it was built before the spring of 1919.

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That is a great photo of the Titan on the threshing job-----------and thanks to Roger's expertise on dating it.

******

Gary----

I recommend that you post your freighting pics on SmokStak's "horse drawn" forum. Lots of early history in those pictures------

DD

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Wow, Anson, I'm impressed you're impressed, but that took a lot of effort to post here. I've not been on the SmokStak horse area, that I know of. Of course I don't have a Wrangler. Not even a Jeep Wrangler. Perhaps you should "cut and paste" my stuff? Let me know when it's there and I'll go have a look! Gary

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That is a great photo of the Titan on the threshing job-----------and thanks to Roger's expertise on dating it.

******

Gary----

I recommend that you post your freighting pics on SmokStak's "horse drawn" forum. Lots of early history in those pictures------

DD

Yes, thanks to Roger for inspiring me to go back and search a little further . Did not find any more on the Titan but this stuck tractor photo from the same area and time looked like something we might all enjoy looking at here on the forum.

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