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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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I'd just posted this on another thread. The X-1 rocket with Captain Chuck Yeager inside, after being dropped from the mother B-29 in 1947, when he broke the sound barrier for the first time anyone had done it flying.

. Gary ;)

Gary, I guess the obvious question might be, is this Chuck Yeager any relation to you?

I took a few pictures in my "N.O.S." Ford parts inventory I think the two shiny ones are grille pieces from a 40 Standard Ford. Unfortunately they are both for the left side. No matching pair.

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I'd just posted this on another thread. The X-1 rocket with Captain Chuck Yeager inside, after being dropped from the mother B-29 in 1947, when he broke the sound barrier for the first time anyone had done it flying.

. Gary ;)

Gary, I guess the obvious question might be, is this Chuck Yeager any relation to you?

I took a few pictures in my "N.O.S." Ford parts inventory I think the two shiny ones are grille pieces from a 40 Standard Ford. Unfortunately they are both for the left side. No matching pair.

Ralph,

Those are some pretty rare parts you have there. Unfortunately, like you say...

And my nephew, Randy is in this photo with me and Mike, of the 20hp Reeves last Friday. Randy knew how to set his timer on his camera for this threesome picture off of my tripod.

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Randy's dad, who was my late brother Bill, a radio news man, was chosen by the Associated Press as Montana's representative to attend a JFK news conference in Washington D.C. in 1963. There were some old timers who thought he shouldn't have been chosen, but they were assured they'd be next. Of course, after the assassination, there were no more JFK news conferences. While Bill was there, also present was Chuck Yeager. They had lunch and coffee together, both being pilots and military had plenty to talk about, sharing their last names. Both of our grandfathers, mine and Chuck's German surnames were Jäger and his grandfather came from a spot near our grandfather, as I recall. My grandpa Yaeger "Americanized" his name twice. German Jäger's were told in America that they could eliminate the "umlaut" by adding an "e". Grandpa's name was then Jaeger. Chuck's grandpa's name became Jeager. My grandpa got tired of people calling his name "J-ger" so he changed his name from Jaeger to Yaeger, so people would call him "Yaeger." Chuck's grandpa obviously did a similar (Yea instead of Yae) thing, for the same reason.

Are we related? Possibly. Maybe even probably, but Jäger is a pretty popular name in Germany and is translated; "hunter, sportsman, rifleman." One more thing about both my brother, General Bill Yaeger and General Chuck Yeager, they were purportedly "the only two generals who didn't have their flying status removed when attaining the rank of general." I was told that the military had $o much involved in their training and status, they couldn't be "augering in an aircraft." We all have a darn good idea of Chuck's flying capabilities. Bill retired after 37 years as an Army Master Aviator, qualified in eight US Army aircraft, fixed and rotary wing. Gary ;)

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I'd just posted this on another thread. The X-1 rocket with Captain Chuck Yeager inside, after being dropped from the mother B-29 in 1947, when he broke the sound barrier for the first time anyone had done it flying.

. Gary ;)

Gary, I guess the obvious question might be, is this Chuck Yeager any relation to you?

I took a few pictures in my "N.O.S." Ford parts inventory I think the two shiny ones are grille pieces from a 40 Standard Ford. Unfortunately they are both for the left side. No matching pair.

Ralph,

In '62 I had a '40 Standard Coupe with a grille like that. Everyone told me it was a 39 DeLuxe grille and I know the headlight bezels were chrome from a DeLuxe.. The '40 Standard had a painted grille and painted headlight bezels. They all fit the same. I always thought the '39 DeLuxe and the 40 Standard were better lines than the '40 DeLuxe. I see one of those grilles in your pile, too. Good stuff there. Some of that stuff is broken on my '40 DeLuxe and will have to be replaced. It has become expensive. I hit a cow on the road at night with my coupe. I had to replace the right front fender, right door, and hood and grille. I never did find a grille that suited me, but I did get a good hood and door and an NOS fender locally. $17.50 was my total bill for the parts and the door had all the glass in it and in good shape. Just bolted it all on. Good to go. Paint later.

Ron

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Ralph,

In '62 I had a '40 Standard Coupe with a grille like that. Everyone told me it was a 39 DeLuxe grille and I know the headlight bezels were chrome from a DeLuxe.. The '40 Standard had a painted grille and painted headlight bezels. They all fit the same. I always thought the '39 DeLuxe and the 40 Standard were better lines than the '40 DeLuxe. I see one of those grilles in your pile, too. Good stuff there. Some of that stuff is broken on my '40 DeLuxe and will have to be replaced. It has become expensive. I hit a cow on the road at night with my coupe. I had to replace the right front fender, right door, and hood and grille. I never did find a grille that suited me, but I did get a good hood and door and an NOS fender locally. $17.50 was my total bill for the parts and the door had all the glass in it and in good shape. Just bolted it all on. Good to go. Paint later.

Ron

It would be good to see a picture of your old Ford Ron. I have a 38 Deluxe parts car but nothing from the front end will interchange with the 39, Would you believe I got those Ford parts for $1.? Along with a truck load of other junk. The guy that bought the building at the auction sale wanted all that :"junk" cleaned out so I made an offer and he accepted. Good deal for both of us I think.

Here is a picture from today of an IH tractor on a Sask. farm. Discovered a "miss" in the oat field and had to do a little filling in.

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A friend on Facebook sent me this picture of a 1915 Stanley 9-passenger Mountain Wagon built on a 1919 condensing chassis. He re-piped it and "hid" hydraulic brakes inside the original brake drums. Since this thing will cruise 85+ mph on a freeway, brakes are a great idea! It's sure a lovely outfit.

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Darn near an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm here. Do I need to explain? Reeves and Case were step-sisters, when Case purchased the farm implement line of Emerson-Brantingham in 1927 or 28, which E-B had owned Reeves & Company before the factory burned in 1925. And since Tenneco bought Case and International Harvester Company, this is darn near an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm and I love that smoke from a "Live" steamer. Gary ;)

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A friend on Facebook sent me this picture of a 1915 Stanley 9-passenger Mountain Wagon built on a 1919 condensing chassis. He re-piped it and "hid" hydraulic brakes inside the original brake drums. Since this thing will cruise 85+ mph on a freeway, brakes are a great idea! It's sure a lovely outfit.

Gary ;)

Its hard to imagine that old Stanley cruising at 85. I guess it would surprise a few people.

I scanned a page from my Ford catalogue showing a view of the 39 front ends. Unfortunately couldn't fit all of the trucks page in with it. 39 was the first year for the Mercury and the first year for hydraulic brakes.

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I was posting over in the "Wheatland" thread, so thought it a good time to post pictures of my 1967 International (not Farmall) 806 Wheatland I bought new from Woods Brother's Implement in Hobson, Montana, from dealer Howard F. Woods. The Wheatland International was brought out as an inexpensive farm tractor, not a "cheap" farm tractor.

It had the factory IH cab with heater and blower and would have had the large, wide, round fenders of the International Series, not the flat top fenders of the Farmall Series. The headlights were above the red, cast iron grille. It did NOT have a Torque Amplifier; did not have a PTO and did not have a three point hitch. It did have the IH long rear axle and factory duals, plus had the NON ADJUSTABLE International front axle with flotation tires. It was a good, feisty flatland tractor. The "Wheatland" decal was above the "806 emblem" behind the radiator panel. And, it was an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm!

The tractor side view.

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The tractor side view with the plows hitched.

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The tractor rear view with the plows attached and the 1967 C-1100 pickup fueling the 806.

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And a picture of it working ground ahead of my father in-law's WD-9 and 150 IH Shovel Drills at Moore(Eddies Corner - 1 mile away), Montana. Gary ;)

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. I guess we're never too old to learn? Gary ;)

That may be true Gary but at this stage of the game it is a question of will I still remember tomorrow what I leaned today? :wacko:

Here is a nice line up of old cars in Tisdale, Sask. in 1928. First one on the left looks like a Model T to me.

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Ralph,

I hear you about remembering yesterday's lesson! That car at the left. Very interesting old coupe. It is NOT a Model T. It is quite similar, but has me wondering just what it is? Maybe Ol' Roger will know? It was obviously trying to be in direct competition with Henry Ford for market share.

MnRed,

Dealing with Howard Woods was always an event.

I later worked for him one winter, after he'd bought a convoy of Montana Department of Highways IH dump trucks of the 1960 type. We stretched them, remodeled the dump style hoists into "scissor hoists" and put new Midwest grain boxes on them to sell as "farm trucks." They were B-184's and were one heck of a truck. I ended up with the one Howard had under his tilt bed delivery unit. It was a swell grain truck and I got used to air brakes. That engine got 7 mpg uphill, downhill, loaded, unloaded but was powerful and would get you there and back.

I know I've said this before, but Howard told me, "I screw people so bad the first time, they ALWAYS come back to deal and get even!" Howard was a huge man with a big heart and sure passed on long before his time.

I'm putting on a picture a neighbor brought over to the shop at Silver Creek yesterday. He came over last Friday afternoon, when I was there alone. He wanted to know what was happening, so I turned the engine over for him and tooted the whistles. Then I said, you should get up here and toot them yourself! He did and thought that was something fantastic. He then wanted to take my picture with it and was kind enough to bring it over yesterday and give to me. I've attended many, many steam events as a participant over my life. I often got photos of other people and other engines, or even the one I was on, but you seldom take one of yourself with your engine. So I really appreciated Rod being so kind. Gary ;)

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Ralph, I think the car in the lower left hand corner of your photo is a 1923-1924 Chevrolet Coupe with an optional chrome/nickel radiator shell.


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Ralph, I think the car in the lower left hand corner of your photo is a 1923-1924 Chevrolet Coupe with an optional chrome/nickel radiator shell.

Thanks for that info Roger . It certainly does resemble the Chevrolet and they were a popular car here in Sask. in those days.

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well i got myself, i was thinking of the doors, i knew something wasn`t right but it is correct for a tractor, wrong for the auto! sorry my bad.

You refer to the suicide doors as they were called by some. Ford had them in 33-34 I think. My 39 has them on the rear doors of the four door sedan.

Might as well throw in another old photo of small town Sask. Were the streets ever that crowded with cars? Maybe all lined up to watch the "Dominion Day" parade on July 1? This one from Unity, Sask.

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Not much happening here, other than heat. I got a message on Facebook from friends Bob Rhode (author, professor, historian) and Dalene Deck (full size steam locomotive engineer [and a half scale traction engine here.]), giving me a bad time and yanking my chain about them having a good time at Wauseon, Ohio, at the National Thresher's Association (wet!) show. Bob has written one of the finer steam books, Steam Tractor Encyclopedia, and 15 other fine books; and Dalene is a bonafide, licensed engineer on the Toltec and Cumbre excursion RR.

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I snapped this picture of Mike inside the 20hp Reeves firebox yesterday at Silver Creek. I have never gotten one of him inside the firebox before. While that door hole looks huge, due to camera angle, it is a snug fit for him (and me), especially with coveralls on. There's no extra room for "lumpy" things in your pockets, or we get stuck.

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Since it was hotter than blazes here yesterday (92.4 degrees at 1:15 PM), we rigged up a fan in the smoke box of the Reeves to blow air through the flues and help cool Mike as he labored in the firebox. We got the grates back in, then quit for the day. He took his wife Pam for supper and "Grammy" and I took care of the kids, which was their Christmas present; dinner and sitting. Gary ;)

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I am posting this TV news footage of the National Threshers Association's 69th annual show at Wauseon, Ohio's Fulton County Fairgrounds. They put on a great show there and it's too bad the rain was so hard on their show. Gary

http://www.13abc.com/story/22717822/antique-tractors-showcased-at-fulton-county-fairgrounds

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Mike's back lot has suffered a little since his house project started, but he cleared up things and backed Toot, his Farmall M into a belt I'd brought from Kalilpell, to a Sears buzz saw I brought from Kalispell, that we bolted down onto a concrete pad. The belt can be backed into and the saw will take it. We have quite a bit of firewood for the steam engines, but we'll have more yet, it appears. Oh, won't this make an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm? It was in the mid-90's here today. This kind of work will bring sweat to your brow.

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I have been working on the 20hp Reeves. The engine had a broken king post or "pedestal" that supports the front end of the boiler barrel from the front axle and has the swivel ball that allows it to steer. I located another king post in North Dakota from a friend. Sadly, the holes in the original king post don't exactly match the alignment pattern of the replacement.post. The handmade bolts that were used to hold the replacement onto the boiler didn't hold, due to some cross threading, etc. I've been boring the king post holes out to more closely align with the boiler holes and have built studs the diameter of 1/2" pipe. I screw in the studs, which tighten well, as they're tapered threads, then I make and bore out a nut to be welded to the stud. Then we tighten them another 1/8 to 1/4 turn. When that is finished, I'll dam up the king post, front and rear, and pour lead into the void space at front and rear, which was the original match up. Incidentally, to dam up the area, and build a "funnel" on each of four corners to pour lead into, I'll use the "Play Dough" I bought at Wally world. It hardens and makes as good a product for this type of pouring as man has devised, right Roger? Roger is an old hand at pouring babbit bearings, which is the same principle as this, and the same principle as me pouring Sharps rifle bullets years ago. Gary ;)

The corner "bolts" are done except for trimming the welding slobber. I put in the front center stud and took this picture. It will resemble the outer corners when finished. They're all in and welded, but two more, which I'll do Wednesday. Boy, the mid-90's heat had this old farm boy sweating today!

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Mike's back lot has suffered a little since his house project started, but he cleared up things and backed Toot, his Farmall M into a belt I'd brought from Kalilpell, to a Sears buzz saw I brought from Kalispell, that we bolted down onto a concrete pad. The belt can be backed into and the saw will take it. We have quite a bit of firewood for the steam engines, but we'll have more yet, it appears. Oh, won't this make an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm? It was in the mid-90's here today. This kind of work will bring sweat to your brow.

. Gary ;)

Gary, that is pretty hot to be working at anything at 90 degrees. I think we were in the high 80s today and that was hot too. Lucky it was a holiday this side of the border so I took the day off and did some touring with friends. Came across this IH tractor on a Sask. farm. Looks like it was a lot hotter there at some point this spring. W4 or 6?

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