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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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What exactly is IH tractors on a Montana farm? Seems like I've seen a bit of everything on this topic

See page one of this thread for an explanation of how this thread started.

Gary, I guess it is a re-run but while we are on the subject of threshing photos I only have these two very early photos of my grandfather's threshing outfit. The IH Famous engine and Aultman Taylor threshing machine. Date is about 1910. I don't know if this is the original machinery that burned down later that fall or if it is already the replacement.

What exactly is IH tractors on a Montana farm? Seems like I've seen a bit of everything on this topic

IH_COLLECTOR,

Check what Ralph said: "See page one." It shows the start date of the thread and if you read the first 100 pages and several subsequent pages, you will see IH Tractors. It has since become a "table at a coffee shop" where us old guys come to recall and recollect things we experienced in the past 70 years... I guess?? It's not too awfully pornographic and there is information here you couldn't buy elsewhere. Sometimes old guys know or remember things of importance too, and it can be well to pay attention when one of those other old guys speak. It has just "morphed" a little throughout the past seven or so years. Would it be less deceptive if we started a new thread, "Experienced IH Owner's Coffee Table?" Maybe so? About the time I say to myself, it's time to knock this thing in the head, others start posting something interesting that needs an answer or comment. It's not a conspiracy. Stuff just happens, sometimes.

Here are a couple of pictures of IH Tractors on a Montana Farm too. Me on the 1935 F-12 a few weeks ago and my grandson about 18 years ago, driving my old 16hp garden tractor around the 15hp Case steam engine and "Annie," our 1939 Farmall H, or the 181st one built. Gary ;)

attachicon.gifIHC F-12 Farmall outside 5-27-13 red.jpg

attachicon.gifMaverik, Annie & 15hp Case at Whitefish.jpg

Whether you keep this or "get another table", l hope ya'll keep it going. This post and the "vintage ads" are the first two l check every day when l come online here at RP. Then go check and see if there's anything pertaining to 560's and/or LP's......lol

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Red tractors plowing soybeans on a Mississippi farm-----------some of this dirt "may have been imported" from Montana at some point in time via the Missouri River and then the mighty Mississippi River. (so this very easily could be Montana dirt--------located in Mississippi and qualifies it to be posted on this thread!!!!) ;):rolleyes:

Shot these pics a couple of days ago--------the farm tenant is plowing out the middles so to open furrows for row irrigation. With all of the spring rains----------no doubt it won't be long before the summer heat causes the need for supplemental water to the crops. Crops are looking good here locally with most corn in full tossle----------but you don't go very far to the north before everything appears to be running behind schedule.

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View is looking northward----------mainline Mississippi River Levee in far background of first picture; south side of the small community of Avon in far right side of second picture.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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Well, it's my little wife's birthday June 13th, so I'm posting tonight. This first picture of my bride of 50+ years was taken in 1945.

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The second picture is of her with their 1950 Ford in 1951. This was her first day of school, second grade at Moore(Eddies Corner), Montana. As a matter of fact, when she was 14 years old, she went to work as a waitress at Eddies Corner. She liked that better than driving the McCormick WD-9 summer fallowing, or driving the F-350 Ford at harvest time.

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This was about 26 years ago (guess) when my nephew Randy, Mike's steam engine partner and Sharon pinned son Mike's lieutenant bars on his shoulders at ROTC graduation at the University of Montana, Missoula. Happy Birthday, Sweetie! Gary ;)

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Delta Dirt,

I was thinking of you when I looked at this video of the Natchez steamboat plying the Mississippi River a friend of mine posted on Facebook, and the steam works in the engine room. It shows what makes that "paddle wheel" go around on a stern wheeler. While I already knew it, it reminded me what a long, long stroke those pistons and rods make on a steamboat. Gary ;)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=kPamW4DzccA#!

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Happy B-day to Sharron.

******

Thanks for the steamboat video------I seriously doubt that the early steamboats engine rooms were quite that clean!!!!

In my earlier days, I always wanted to build a "sidewheeler" pontoon barge utilizing a Volkswagon engine/rear axle assembly. would have been relatively simple------steering with brakes and differential (along with a rudder)------but reckon that most likely won't get done for now. At least I can still dream-------------maybe in my next life I will get the sidewheeler completed and make a trip up the Mississippi and Missouri to Fort Benton (world's innermost port).LOL

DD

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Shot these pics a couple of days ago--------the farm tenant is plowing out the middles so to open furrows for row irrigation.

View is looking northward----------mainline Mississippi River Levee in far background of first picture; south side of the small community of Avon in far right side of second picture.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

That is some flat open land there Delta. And looking like a good crop too. Just for a contrasting comparison, here is a shot I took yesterday morning of my wheat. I wouldn't normally take the time for a picture but had to get out of the cab to move a dead tree that had fallen in the way. Wheat is looking good. That sixty foot sprayer barely fits some of the openings on this farm that I call the "Hundred acre woods".

I switched on the booms at 8 yesterday morning and shut them off about 9:30 at night. Got a good few acres done along with a couple of hours (28 miles) road driving with the old 2090.

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Another scenic shot with the 2090. Like your spray rig------is that a field cultivator frame you have modified; ------or factory designed as a sprayer???

Intended to compliment you on your spraying shot from last week beside the "pot hole". The duck hunters should be thanking you for preserving those pot holes also-----don't forget to feed the ducks come harvest time.

Last Ducks Unlimited banquet I attended was right after we had encountered 6 weeks of rain one fall-------I told the lady at the door that my donation was in the field. She didn't quite comprehend------until I explained that I had been counting soybeans on the ground that afternoon that calculated to be approx 10+ bu/ac x $6 x 1200 ac = $72---75,000. For the most part------nobody appreciates the risk a farmer takes.

Wheat harvest is going strong here in the Delta this week-------decent yields, but apparently smothered down slightly by all of the spring rains.

DD

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Another scenic shot with the 2090. Like your spray rig------is that a field cultivator frame you have modified; ------or factory designed as a sprayer???

Intended to compliment you on your spraying shot from last week beside the "pot hole". The duck hunters should be thanking you for preserving those pot holes also-----don't forget to feed the ducks come harvest time.

DD

Thanks Anson, in fact that is a common , factory made Brandt sprayer. 20 year old technology still getting the job done. Its a long way from the quarter million dollar sprayers many are running up here but it still works for me.

Yes, we raise a lot of ducks here. I don't see much crop damage from them. ITs those cursed Canada Geese that do it. Those potholes that have become lakes on my brother's farm have some big bare patches in the crop around the edges every year.

I've got a little piece of IH history here. Hope I haven't already posted it but if so, here it is again. The original document having my two grandfathers and their brothers signatures when they purchased their IH Famous engine and Aultman Taylor threshing machine in 1910. I guess that $899 debt in 1910 might be like a quarter million dollars today?

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Shot these pics a couple of days ago--------the farm tenant is plowing out the middles so to open furrows for row irrigation.

View is looking northward----------mainline Mississippi River Levee in far background of first picture; south side of the small community of Avon in far right side of second picture.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

That is some flat open land there Delta. And looking like a good crop too. Just for a contrasting comparison, here is a shot I took yesterday morning of my wheat. I wouldn't normally take the time for a picture but had to get out of the cab to move a dead tree that had fallen in the way. Wheat is looking good. That sixty foot sprayer barely fits some of the openings on this farm that I call the "Hundred acre woods".

I switched on the booms at 8 yesterday morning and shut them off about 9:30 at night. Got a good few acres done along with a couple of hours (28 miles) road driving with the old 2090.

Ralph , I assume thats spring wheat.

My winter wheat is in full head this week, coop just sprayed the fungicide.

Ray

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Here are some things I brought over here from my Facebook page, taken by my friend Mark Corson. The first two are of a JI Case automobile. These things are going on this weekend, at the JI Case Heritage Show and I'm too embarrassed to admit I don't know where it's being held. Tubacase47 will know.

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This is a half scale model of a 32hp Reeves double simple engine, shown here belted to something.

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This is a quarter scale 16hp Reeves model and Case threshing machine. Gary ;)

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These are two more pictures I wanted to put here from the Case heritage show. The first is Jowett's 13hp Reeves with Gould valves, and Reeves water wagon.

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This is the complete unit of that little quarter scale (3" to the foot) Reeves and Case threshing machine. That man is a genius with his workmanship.

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Now in keeping with my contract, here is a couple of IH Tractors on a Montana Farm. Mike was pulling Randy's Farmall A out with his Farmall M, the first time the A saw daylight after restoration. Not that it can't happen this time of year in Montana, but this photo wasn't taken today. :) Gary ;)

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Tubacase47,

Thanks Tom... I knew you'd know!

A good friend of mine just purchased this photograph on eBay. It was taken in your birth state, Tom. A 40hp Reeves pulling six sections of 6-disk Emerson plows. I always like to know if these engines are the early US or states models, or if it was one of the later Canadian Special engines. Ironically, this position of the photograph covers up every telltale sign I use to identify them. So it's just "a 40hp" Reeves. Gary ;)

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I'd just finished a Model T drive today and decided to park beside the steam engines and take a picture with my phone. I took a couple then my phone switched to a message from our oldest daughter Michaelle. She asked if I was anywhere near Mike's phone and could take a Father's Day call. I "texted" back, yes. So I went into the shop, up the stairs and waited for the phone to ring. Then I took the picture of me on the old black DIAL phone. Gary ;)

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That Caterpillar grille isn't nearly as cool as a 32 Ford grille, but if you're going Cat, you may as well "go Cat!?" I don't know how that type of horsepower plays out in a street rod? Maybe it'll climb telephone poles with good footing, or maybe it screams like a nitro fuel dragster?? I couldn't tell you. Gary ;)

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I remember seeing that Cat Rod about a year or so ago. Big article about it. Engine and power train came out of a wrecked truck. And the grille is off a front end loader, 966 I think it said. And I wouldn't swear to it but I think it said the body was a mid 20's Essex. I saw a video of it on youtube and it will definately smoke the rear tires...lol

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I remember seeing that Cat Rod about a year or so ago. Big article about it. Engine and power train came out of a wrecked truck. And the grille is off a front end loader, 966 I think it said. And I wouldn't swear to it but I think it said the body was a mid 20's Essex. I saw a video of it on youtube and it will definately smoke the rear tires...lol

twostepn2001,

Thanks for that information. I figured with that much hor$epower, it had to do more than look utilitarian. I've seen dragsters and a Westinghouse powered jet car with parachutes, but I have to admit, this is the first hotrod I've ever seen with a Jake Brake! I'd just received it last week from a friend as an email forward. Gary

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Professor-----after enlarging the blacksmith pic, it appears that everyone but the fellow standing in the doorway are younger boys.

I wonder if this was not a school-----with the man with the beard being the instructor??

I also note that all of the horse shoes are hanging "upside down". Wrangler always advised me to hang the shoes open end up-----so the luck couldn't pour out of them!!!!!!

'course--------I never had any luck to spare-----so I have done as advised. Based on this real deal photo------may not be any truth to Wrangler's old saying???

DD

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Professor-----after enlarging the blacksmith pic, it appears that everyone but the fellow standing in the doorway are younger boys.

I wonder if this was not a school-----with the man with the beard being the instructor??

I also note that all of the horse shoes are hanging "upside down". Wrangler always advised me to hang the shoes open end up-----so the luck couldn't pour out of them!!!!!!

'course--------I never had any luck to spare-----so I have done as advised. Based on this real deal photo------may not be any truth to Wrangler's old saying???

DD

Anson,

I went back and looked at the picture again, myself. You're observant for being ready to enter your eighth decade! (I'm right on your tail!) I believe you're right about the inspector / student scenario. There is a little bit of everything going on there. I notice the "boy" at the right of the blacksmith's cone is at a lathe making neck yokes, with some hanging behind him on the wall. There may be some truth to Wrangler's advice, but even after putting mine upwards, always; my luck got siphoned out of mine anyway. Ask Wrangler if it is just a "mare's tale?"

I've been working on Mike & Randy's 20hp Reeves engine from the Mehmke Museum, as of late. This morning I've been putting in "hand hole plates." This first photo shows one of two that go up on the barrel of the engine. The top one in particular can have the plate be dropped inside and you'd have to fish it out. There was a piece of wire from 45 years ago, still on the stem or stud, so I copied their lead and added wire, to save fishing.

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I want to hydro the boiler, which involves removing the pop valves and plugging their openings... One plugged and the other used to fill the boiler clear full of water, then plugged. I found plugs, then got one of my antique wrenches off of the shop wall display, to use, to remove the brass pop valves. This old monkey (Monche) type of wrench will do what no modern wrench can do, as it has 90-degree jaws, and doesn't leave "claw marks" like a pipe wrench would. However this type of wrench also contains the ability to turn pipes, with the opposite jaws.

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Likely Wednesday, I'll start a "hydro" on the boiler. After filling the boiler completely full, with all exiting valves closed, you attach the hose from the hydro pump onto the drain or blow down valve at the bottom of the boiler. The water system's pump here at Silver Creek will put about 50 pounds into the boiler, maybe more, as I don't know what the system is set at to cut out. Then you begin to hand pump the hydro pump and it will add pressure to the boiler. And it happens darn fast, once the boiler is completely filled. I'm not certain what Mike wants it pumped up to, but originally from the factory, the engines were pumped to 125 to 150 PERCENT of their rated operating pressure. A small fire should be lit inside the firebox, to warm the water, as cold water pressure is too harsh on a boiler. This 20hp Reeves would have operated at 150 psi from the factory, so they would have pumped it from 185 to 225 psi for the test hydro of the boiler's integrity. There should be no thuds or pops, when pumping and if there are, there are problems that need attention, before ever draining down to operating level of the water, and throwing a fire in. This picture shows the pump linked by (modern hydraulic) hose to the drain valve. The last picture shows the pump a little better. It will pump 1,000 psi, so you have to be careful. Forgive my crummy "dumb phone" photos, but they're the only ones I can post here at Mike's place. Gary ;)

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I also note that all of the horse shoes are hanging "upside down". Wrangler always advised me to hang the shoes open end up-----so the luck couldn't pour out of them!!!!!!

'course--------I never had any luck to spare-----so I have done as advised. Based on this real deal photo------may not be any truth to Wrangler's old saying???

DD

Anson, we had the same belief here. Hang those horseshoes up so the good luck does not fall out. Its been nearly 60 years since the last horse left this farm but I still have the odd shoe "hanging" around just for good luck.

Been a rainy weekend so I had the opportunity to shine up the old R160 gravel truck and shoot some video while doing some actual work with it. Here is a still shot of trucking carragana trees.

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How long do you leave the test pressure in place, and what is an acceptable pressure drop over the life of the test? (I was told that there was no set standard, but the common test was a low pressure test which lasted 5 minutes, and then a 10 minute high pressure test, with no more than a 3 percent drop over the life, BUT at some point, the line had to level out to be acceptable.

Are not the fittings, piping, and such marked with XXX CWP (cold working pressure)?

Is there a open pop-off (relief) valve in the system to prevent overpressure during the test..

Not that it is comparable but when I would pressure test my cementing unit using what passed for cold water, the air temperature would cause the test pressure to increase due to the expansion of the water from it absorbing heat from the air and metal.

Art,

This is not an "official" pressure test. This is to test some boiler work that was done on the boiler in 2007, when Farmall Kid was in Afghanistan. I'm not going to "see what she'll take" but just give it a pressure test to operating pressure and maybe 25 psi more. I don't understand the low pressure test as isn't done on steam boilers in Montana, to my knowledge? If the valves hold, there should be little to no loss of pressure at the high pressure test. Actually if it were left, and in the sunshine of our hot days, it would likely have solar gain pressure due to the black boiler. I remember Austin Monk talking about that happening with an engine he'd left for the afternoon. I'm not going to leave it for more than about 15 minutes, as I see no need for it. The valves and fittings on the engine are SWP or steam rated. A valve without a steam rating is something I won't use. And a steam rated valve will have maybe a 150 or 200 pound steam rating, which would likely be rated at 200 to 250 cold water pressure. There is no "Pop or relief valve" in this system for protection from over pressuring. This is a touchy thing to administer. I read on the SmokStak forum a few years ago about a guy who didn't have a boiler pump like mine and used his shop's pressure washer. He ruined his boiler before he could get it shut off. I don't intend to do that! But if there is a flaw in the boiler and something gives way, that is the purpose of this test. So it doesn't happen under steam pressure, which can have the "zipper effect" and when one thing gives, it just keeps going into devastation. I don't want any of that. being on the handle of the boiler pump is sort of like playing a fine violin. Hopefully, the Good Lord willing, I won't end up just "fiddling around" with that fine violin! Actually, the "cold" water test is quite a "violent" act to perform on a boiler, but it gives one an idea what is a safe operating area afterward. By "violent" I mean there have been boilers destroyed with over pressuring carelessly, but that generally rates back to the 150% over pressure tests.

Ralph,

The old R-160 dump truck shines almost like it was brand new! I had a yellow R-160 years ago, for a while. And I had a R-120 3/4 ton pickup. Gary ;)

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