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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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Seeding has ground to a halt in this part of ON.

this is what we woke up to this morning, all melted by 11.00 am:

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Ray

Ray, that is a depressing sight for sure when you get snow this time of year. Would you believe we had 28C today? I think thats near 80F. And Gary, we too have dry enough conditions that all of Sask. from P.A. south is under a fire advisory. Could be showers tonight. Grass is sure slow growing and the cattle still look for hay in the feeder.

Still busy anhydrousing but only short days as I seem to be rationed to one tank a day due to high demand now that everybody is getting in the field.

Just throwing a picture from a couple of weeks ago. Some old Vega cream separators in a friend's storage shed. He throws away better stuff than I save but he is keeping these two antiques.

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As usual, I didn't go to Silver Creek today, but I snatched this youtube off of SmokStak of a "12-header" of steam locomotives in Poland. It appeared as though three or four of them were the Chinese versions built there until about 10 years ago. This is a real sight to an old steam guy and I think you'd all enjoy it as well. Gary ;)

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As usual, I didn't go to Silver Creek today, but I snatched this youtube off of SmokStak of a "12-header" of steam locomotives in Poland. It appeared as though three or four of them were the Chinese versions built there until about 10 years ago. This is a real sight to an old steam guy and I think you'd all enjoy it as well. Gary ;)

Wow, that is a lot of smoke and steam. I wonder how they get them all synchronized so they all pull equally? Or maybe just the front one was working and the rest were all idling in "neutral"

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Quite the sight! (Not that it is in anyway comparable but I saw a UP freight go thru Bennett, CO today with 7 locomotives on the front).

I still remember my Dad telling me, complete with sound effects, about when the cattle trains coming out of western Nebraska and Wyoming would stall out on Melia Hill, between Gretna and Ashland, and having to send a helper engine out of Ashland to get them restarted.

Melia Hill, is the highest point on the Burlington (BNSF) between Denver and Chicago. (It is also named after relatives)

Art,

I never saw anything like it "in the day" but this is quite a sight. There is one of those Chinese locomotives in Iowa, I believe. But it seems obvious that there are still steam trains running in Poland. I later counted six of the Chinese locos.

I remember as a boy during July and August harvest when it was so hot in the house, all of the windows were opened at night, hoping you could get a night of sleep. We lived 1 & 1/4 miles from Glengarry where the Montana Elevator would fill grain cars and keep them on the siding there. The Milwaukee train leaving Lewistown (about 8 miles east) would come up to Glengarry with their trains, cut them off and pick up the loaded grain cars at Glengarry. The pull up to Glengarry from Cottonwood Creek, about a half mile east, was quite a little grade. With the grain cars now coupled to the rest of the train and the full grain cars from Lewistown, the locomotive would invariably spin out two or three times before getting all of the cars up the hill and headed to Buttermilk Curve where we lived. Not only the crossing whistles, but the spin out with the Chug, Chug, ch, ch,ch, ch, ch, ch,...Chug that locomotive put out was aggravating when trying to sleep, but such a beautiful memory in what's left of this old "brane" of mine.

I put on a picture of the long closed Montana Elevator at Glengarry, where I attended the one room school for eight years.

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And this is a typical Milwaukee RR steam locomotive as used on the spur line between Harlowton on the main line, to Lewistown and into the Judith Basin. Gary ;)

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As usual, I didn't go to Silver Creek today, but I snatched this youtube off of SmokStak of a "12-header" of steam locomotives in Poland. It appeared as though three or four of them were the Chinese versions built there until about 10 years ago. This is a real sight to an old steam guy and I think you'd all enjoy it as well. Gary ;)

Wow, that is a lot of smoke and steam. I wonder how they get them all synchronized so they all pull equally? Or maybe just the front one was working and the rest were all idling in "neutral"

Ralph,

Steam is the "elastic gas" and because of that, they can pretty much synchronize themselves, if the guys recognize the speed they're trying to travel for his exhibition. Steam takes care of the difference. Gary

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Looking at the steam locomotives in the multiple hitch--------has anyone ever plowed with a multi steam engine set up???

I can see the newsarticles now------ two steam engineers from Montana and Minnesota set new plow day record pulling 44 bottom plow at a speed of 44 mph!!!!!

The engineer from Minnesota wuz quoted as sayin: "that's hittin the bull in the a$$ with a big axe".

LOL

DD

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Anson,

You must be thinkin' of the legendary Paul Bynyon and his faithful pullin' pardner Babe the blue Ox. Now the'd handle 44 bottoms in heavy soil before breakfast.

Charlie

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Here are 55-bottoms being pulled at Rantoul, IL by three 110hp Case engines. My friends, Graham Sellers, Warren Bellinger and Carl Tuttle were the engineers. They didn't pull at no 55 mph though. This is no longer the world's record. I believe 60-bottoms were pulled in Canada by three 110hp Case engines, if I remember correctly. Gary ;)

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Figured I would get them steam engineers stirred up!!!!lol

Serious question: in the top photo of the 3 steamers pulling the 55 bottoms; explain what is going on with the difference in the color of the exhaust (middle is heavy black-----versus two on outside being lighter color)

I notice the same scenario on some of the old train videos.

Never been around an operating steam engine in my lifetime--------have been around plenty of people that can blow that much smoke!!!

DD

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Here are 55-bottoms being pulled at Rantoul, IL by three 110hp Case engines. My friends, Graham Sellers, Warren Bellinger and Carl Tuttle were the engineers. They didn't pull at no 55 mph though. This is no longer the world's record. I believe 60-bottoms were pulled in Canada by three 110hp Case engines, if I remember correctly. Gary ;)

attachicon.gifRantoul, IL Graham, Warren, Carl 8-28-05 red.jpg

attachicon.gifRantoul, IL Carl, Warren, Graham 8-28-05 red.jpg

Graham Sellers lives in my County, my old boss farms his farm!

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M Diesel,

Thanks for posting more about those locomotives. They're sure fascinating to this old farm boy who used to see steam locomotives about four times a day going by on the old Milwaukee RR on the homestead. I got to help a Milwaukee engineer shift the Johnson bar and open & close the throttle, at the roundhouse at Lewistown as a 7th grader. A great, great memory for me.

Art,

I could have gotten much more involved, but I didn't want everyone seeing me going through my gyrations on that scenario. Another thing I forgot to mention was the "grinding 'ringing sound'" those locomotive tires made when they were slipping on that rail; steel to steel.

Anson,

I'm going to guess the difference in color resulted in a little different "diet" of whatever fuel was being fed them? The stage the fire is burning in, creates different smoke too. A "green" (not completely burning yet) coal fire will often have quite a brown or beige smoke, while some will show pretty black smoke, all the way to white smoke. I can't believe an old guy, (who is my age), has never bumped into a live, operating steam engine yet?

BOBSIH856,

It is a small world!

A couple of days ago, I was saying we're in a drought situation already, in spite of being quite green or greening up. Well, today the DNRC bucket choppers were battling five different forest fires here in the Helena Valley. The Sheriff has a no burning rule in force and they are suspecting arson. I guess that's one lame way to "create jobs?" Gary ;)

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We just didn't have the big steamers to much extent down this way------most likely relate to their heavy weight and our soft/muddy land conditions. Also------an over supply of cheap labor that favored "mule style" farming. We basically converted from mules to gasoline powered tractors.

And-------as most of you know;--------cheap labor is the most expensive you can hire.

My most favorite bumper sticker of all time is: "if I had known they wuz gonna be this much trouble------I would have picked on my own dam cotton!!!!

DD

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Forgot to ask---

Are the fire photos out close to Mike's place????

And------probably could have smeared a little more butter on the tracks and helped quieten the screeching noise down from the grunting locomotives at Buttermilk Curve!!!!!! LOL

DD

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Anson,

I'm going to guess the difference in color resulted in a little different "diet" of whatever fuel was being fed them? The stage the fire is burning in, creates different smoke too. A "green" (not completely burning yet) coal fire will often have quite a brown or beige smoke, while some will show pretty black smoke, all the way to white smoke. I can't believe an old guy, (who is my age), has never bumped into a live, operating steam engine yet?

Gary, the only steam engine I have worked around was the size that fit on the living room table top and burned solid alcohol fuel.. I was born too late to remember the steam trains that rolled into and out of town here .

I had a busy day with the old Loadstar today. Probably 50 miles of road driving hauling seed. This is a shot taken at the cleaning plant loading up seed wheat with a conveyor. If you look close you can see the three wind mills in the background that supply some of the electricity for the cleaning plant.

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Forgot to ask---

Are the fire photos out close to Mike's place????

And------probably could have smeared a little more butter on the tracks and helped quieten the screeching noise down from the grunting locomotives at Buttermilk Curve!!!!!! LOL

DD

Anson,

Those fires are about 15 miles from his place.

You notice I didn't post about putting grease on the tracks. My dad and some of his brothers did that years ago. It quietens the squeal, I guess, but it doesn't improve traction though. Strangely, on each end, leading into Buttermilk Curve, that ran around our house, they had some kind of greaser that put grease on the flanges of the car wheels, so that the centrifugal force of rounding the corner didn't tend to lift the wheels off of the rails. Centrifugal force DID lift the wheels several times over the years and those RR cars ended up on their sides in our pasture, beside the tracks. I believe those greasers had spare grease left there for the section foreman to stop his "speeder" and refill the greasers. If I remember correctly, that's where Dad and his brothers got their grease for the tracks leading up to Glengarry from Lewistown. That railroad was laid in 1903 and pulled out in 2004. It's now a walking path. Gary

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Anson,

I'm going to guess the difference in color resulted in a little different "diet" of whatever fuel was being fed them? The stage the fire is burning in, creates different smoke too. A "green" (not completely burning yet) coal fire will often have quite a brown or beige smoke, while some will show pretty black smoke, all the way to white smoke. I can't believe an old guy, (who is my age), has never bumped into a live, operating steam engine yet?

Gary, the only steam engine I have worked around was the size that fit on the living room table top and burned solid alcohol fuel.. I was born too late to remember the steam trains that rolled into and out of town here .

I had a busy day with the old Loadstar today. Probably 50 miles of road driving hauling seed. This is a shot taken at the cleaning plant loading up seed wheat with a conveyor. If you look close you can see the three wind mills in the background that supply some of the electricity for the cleaning plant.

Ralph,

That's a great photo! I counted FOUR windmills!

I feel blessed to have gotten to see the tail of the steam era on the railroad. I remember uncle Audie bringing four of us home from the Glengarry School when I was a first grader and just entering Buttermilk Curve's horseshoe from the west, or from Moore and Harlowton, was a brand new (covered wagon) Milwaukee diesel locomotive; something we'd see more and more of as time went on.

I put a couple of encore photos on of locomotives. The first is one of the Milwaukee RR diesels in Lewistown at the Milwaukee Depot on Main Street, which later became the Yogo Inn hotel.

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These electric and steam locomotives are on the same tracks as the first picture, only back by the elevators that are in the distance on the first photo. That steamer was more of a mainline steam engine than the ones generally used on our spur line from Harlowton to Lewistown. The Milwaukee RR used the electrics to help pull trains over the Continental Divide near Butte and in the Cascade Mountains. Going down "the other side, they'd turn from motor to generator and generate more electricity to put back into their grid than they used helping up the mountain. Similar to the windmills helping put that seed into your Loadstar, Ralph! Gary ;)

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On my way to Silver Creek this morning, I cut through a parking lot to get where I needed to go and here set this 1957 Chevy two door hardtop so I had to take a picture of it!

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The Sand Hill Cranes have a nest on Mike's place on Silver Creek. They were squawking this morning so I grabbed the camera and went to have a look. My 10 year old Nikon folding camera doesn't take distant pictures well, but I took them anyway. I carry our junk camera so I won't lose or damage our newer one. This first one shows the pair on the ground.

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I must have spooked them as they did take off. Of course when you push the button to take a picture, there is a two second lag or so. I just followed them and I may have only gotten one of them, but they are magnificent birds. Gary ;)

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Hi Gary: This is not RED or on a MONTANA FARM, but it does concern railroads.

Can you explain to your humble followers ,"How does the differential on railroad units work, when both wheels are fastened solidly to the axle? I know one answer,but would love to hear others. CardaleBob.

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Grain elevator fire in Craigmont, Idaho last Sunday. Actually two different companies' elevators close to each other. Right in the middle of small town. No reported injuries, took a while to contain. At least one held garbonzo beans.

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Hi Gary: This is not RED or on a MONTANA FARM, but it does concern railroads.

Can you explain to your humble followers ,"How does the differential on railroad units work, when both wheels are fastened solidly to the axle? I know one answer,but would love to hear others. CardaleBob.

Gee Bob... I feel like I should be serving a cauldron of Koolaid here for my "humble followers?"

There are no differentials on railroads. I mentioned the flange greasers at each end of Buttermilk Curve a few posts back and that was to assist in tire slippage when rounding nearly 180 degrees of turn, which has to happen with two wheels connected to a common axle. I'm anxious to hear your reason as well.

Greg,

Like Charlie, I can feel the heat from here, it seems. Do most grain elevator fires start with an explosion, or something like an electrical fire, when they burn? I've wondered. When I worked at Billings Chrysler-Plymouth in 1970-74 as head painter, the Billings Fire Department came to our body shop and demonstrated "dust" and explosions with a controlled contraption one of their members built. They said that "wheat dust" (or flour) when ignited by a motor starting on an upper elevator" can easily cause and explosion, as they were demonstrating with electrical current and flour. It was quite a bang too. They just didn't want our body dust and paint fumes doing the same thing when the compressor fired up, I guess? Strangely, we had four overhead natural gas heaters with a standing pilot light in the body shop, but no fires and no explosions (at least while I was there.). Gary ;)

PS: However, anytime we sprayed primer or anything, we had the exhaust fans working. It would almost lift your toupe off of your head.

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Most of the grain elevator fires around here seem to be blamed on electrical problems or overheated bearings, etc. Many seem to be starting during the off hours when not much else is happening. This one was on a Sunday afternoon. These are the older wooden cribbed structures and once they get going there is little chance of stopping them. Seems to be nature's way of ending their lives, as a great many elevators around here become updated this way.

I don't think all types of grain dust are explosive...this was a garbonzo plant. But those are inclined to hold fire and smolder for long periods. I haven't worked much around canola but you guys say it can be treacherous if it accumulates in the wrong places.

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I understand about as much about those elevator fires as I so steam engines------not much.

When the "right conditions" exist with the fine dust particles-----it sure doesn't take much to set a fire off (including in combines and cotton pickers).

DD

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