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Old Binder Guy
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Gary............that tractor-trailor rig has a feature I noticed. That is part of a wagon that made the trailor. Almost looks like steel wheels or hard rubber tires on same.

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Gary............that tractor-trailor rig has a feature I noticed. That is part of a wagon that made the trailor. Almost looks like steel wheels or hard rubber tires on same.

Chub,

I'd noticed that... It almost looks like they took bare wheels and put a hard rubber liner on them somehow. Maybe they were a standard hard rubber tire wheel of some sort? Kind of wonder if Jethro and Ellie Mae were in the restroom?

That was sure interesting history Charlie & Ralph. I'm an old tanker myself, so that is one great picture Ralph.

Gary ;)

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Hi Ralph. Thanks for the good photo and story and welcome. It is good that your grandpa came back from the war alive, mine didn't. Dad's dad was from the southeast corner of MN. Spring Grove. He was in the Army in 1918.

Charley, that was an interesting bit of history. I think the older we get the more we become interested in our family history. Sounds like your Dad was the kind of guy that made the best of a not so good situation and turned out pretty good. Interestingly he was almost the same age as my Dad. (Oct. 5, 1918.).

In his later farming years Dad used to sometimes complain about bad weather but ironicly it was bad weather that may have spared his life in 1944. His troop was on board a landing craft scheduled to cross the channel for Dieppe but weather conditions prevented them from leaving. The Dieppe raid was a bit of a disaster for the allies and many lost their lives in it.

Dad wrote down a lot of his experiences in the army in his last years and I hope some day to get it put into book form. His army experiences were probably the most memorable of his life and he liked to talk about it as did my grandfather of his experiences in WWI. Unfortunately I did not ask nearly enough questions back when I had the chance and its too late now.

Heres one of Dad's favourite pics from Oldenburg, Germany just after the end of the war. Sitting around an Archer tank with some of the other 18th battery members.

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Ralph,

I was so glad to see your dad's picture and read of his service during WWII. I think that is a great idea of you writing about his military experiences. What a fitting tribute that would be.

My dad would have soon been called up for service in WWI, but it ended before even his older brother was shipped overseas. He was too old for service during WWII. Ironically, I still remember him grabbing his old Model 7 Remington semi-automatic in .25 Rem. caliber, and joining others in guarding our local REA sub-station against perceived sabatage. The local association hired six (I think?) farmers to rotate guarding the electric facility during the war and it had a "paycheck," something that had been hard to come by throughout the Great Depression.

I joined the Montana Army National Guard with several other friends early in my senior year at Moore HS. We were early in the new 3-1/2 year program. My brother Bill, who retired from the MTARNG as a Brigadier General after 37 years of service, joined in 1956 under the 8 year program. He didn't attend basic training, but that is what the "1/2" was of my service, Basic Combat Infantry Training. We feared Berlin and had never heard anything of Viet Nam, until after returning home quite some time. I didn't join to avoid service. I was preparing to marry my wife, but wanted to be trained and I would have gone, had our unit gone; married or not.

I had BCIT at Fort Ord, California, three days after graduation. After 8 weeks there, we (8 from Lewistown area) went home and then onto Fort Knox, Kentucky for 16 weeks.

I'd been wanting to post some things here for some time and Ralph... you prompted them. Thanks friend! This first picture was while at Fort Knox in my armor training there... Naturally in the old wooden barracks, which purportedly would burn to the ground in "7 minutes." This picture was taken of my friend Joe Murray and me playing our electric guitars for the guys. (You guitar players likely noticed we were playing in the key of A?)

The second picture is of an M48A1 (Sheridan), which is what we trained in at that time. They were equipped with 90MM main guns and gas engines (Cadillac?) that got 3 gallons to the mile (seriously), as I recall? The regulars, training for Berlin, got the new M48-A2 diesels. I got to be on guard duty one evening, at the main tank park, guarding (200?) tarped and cosmolene covered brand new M60s. I had a wooden night club and an empty Colt M-1917 .45 ACP and wondered what I'd do if Serge had pointed a gun at me and said in a Soviet brogue, "Give me your tanks?"

The second picture is of the M41 (Walker Bulldog) tank with their 76mm main guns, which is what we had back home. We were part of the 163rd Armored Cavalry and were a reconnisance unit, so these hotrods were what we used and I was clocked at 47 mph between Helena and Townsend, Montana on the highway. My son Mike, when a Captain, was commander of a Black Horse Troop of the 11th Armored Cav. I don't remember how fast he stated his nine M1A1 Abrams would go, but faster than my M41, by quite a bit. His M1A1s could fire more accurately flying through the air at 30 mph than either of my old tanks could, stopped and taking 10 seconds to get a round off.

The last two pictures are two I took while stationed at Fort Knox at the Patton Armor Museum. Notice this is back when they still had the old wooden museum building. The first picture shows one of the Allies' tanks of WWI and a 1950s version of the Soviet T-54 from the Korean War. The T-54 was grossly crude and plain, but it had the ability of firing on the move.

The fifth picture was of a friend of mine, Dave Plovanic, posing beside one of Henry Ford's M-3 tanks, circa 1918. These were a one man tank, consisting of an iron shell around a Model T engine and armed with a .30 caliber machine gun. Plovanic was a descendant of several of the Croation stone masons who "built" Lewistown.

Last scan, America's first tank, the Spirit of America, was guess what... You guessed it; a steam powered tank. I wonder what it would have been like to be the "water boy" for this tank?

Gary ;)

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Ralph,

I was so glad to see your dad's picture and read of his service during WWII. I think that is a great idea of you writing about his military experiences. What a fitting tribute that would be.

My dad would have soon been called up for service in WWI, but it ended before even his older brother was shipped overseas. He was too old for service during WWII. Gary ;)

Gary, I didn't know you had military experience but obviously you have some stories to tell about that. Who ever dreamed that there was a steam powered tank at one time? Not me. :mellow: I seem to recall reading that the first Sherman tanks had the Cadillac v8 and the hydramatic transmission. They were outclassed by the heavier German tanks in WWII though. My Dad talked of seeing great numbers of disabled or burnt out Shermans when he got into the European theatre. The one in the picture I posted was a Valentine/Archer tank, also out gunned and armoured by any of the German tanks. Dad drove a few of these but he was mainly a gunner for the 17 pounder artillery guns which were a close match in firepower to the German 88 mm artillery. Something tells me I have already posted pictures of the gun towing trucks that he drove so I will post one of where his troop spent some time after the end of WWII. A nice sandy island in the North Sea called Wangerooge. It was heavily bombed during the war and I have a few photos showing the devastation. Dad always talked about the great sandy beaches they had on that island. Thats a lighthouse in the background. From recent photos I have seen the place has been rebuilt and restored to a nice tourist destination again.

Second photo shows the same guys exploring a crash landed Halifax bomber on the island.

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Ralph,

I was so glad to see your dad's picture and read of his service during WWII. I think that is a great idea of you writing about his military experiences. What a fitting tribute that would be.

My dad would have soon been called up for service in WWI, but it ended before even his older brother was shipped overseas. He was too old for service during WWII. Gary ;)

Gary, I didn't know you had military experience but obviously you have some stories to tell about that. Who ever dreamed that there was a steam powered tank at one time? Not me. :mellow: I seem to recall reading that the first Sherman tanks had the Cadillac v8 and the hydramatic transmission. They were outclassed by the heavier German tanks in WWII though. My Dad talked of seeing great numbers of disabled or burnt out Shermans when he got into the European theatre. The one in the picture I posted was a Valentine/Archer tank, also out gunned and armoured by any of the German tanks. Dad drove a few of these but he was mainly a gunner for the 17 pounder artillery guns which were a close match in firepower to the German 88 mm artillery. Something tells me I have already posted pictures of the gun towing trucks that he drove so I will post one of where his troop spent some time after the end of WWII. A nice sandy island in the North Sea called Wangerooge. It was heavily bombed during the war and I have a few photos showing the devastation. Dad always talked about the great sandy beaches they had on that island. Thats a lighthouse in the background. From recent photos I have seen the place has been rebuilt and restored to a nice tourist destination again.

Second photo shows the same guys exploring a crash landed Halifax bomber on the island.

Ralph,

Yeah... Who'd have "thunk" there had been a steam tank? I can barely say I have any experience, but I had the same training as the regulars at that time. I think you're right about the Cadillac V8 in the Sherman tank, but I'm not positive? I'm quite sure they had hydromatic transmissions. I had an interesting visit with late Hans Ingelke, who used to live here in Whitefish. He told some of us over coffee one morning about tanks. He'd been a German U-boater during WWII.

Ironically, off topic of what I was going to say, one morning another friend, Bob Crane, came in to the coffee shop and he mentioned being in the US submarine service during WWII. One asked the other where they served and pretty soon they were talking about a huge Uboat battle in the North Atlantic one morning and when they compared dates, they'd been sending torpedos to one another on that day!

Hans mentioned he had family who'd been in the German Tank Corps. (I had to put this in Hans' words. It may take a little bit to understand what I've written, using his German brogue.)... Hans said: Ou®a tanks ve®a built by "Vatch Make®as" and it vas constant lea®ning about tolea®ances in da heat offf the dese®at. Ou®a tanks vould sie(z)ce up and da®e may not have been anothe®a von arrrround like it! On da othe® hand, American tanks ve®a everrryvhe®a. (T)Day ve®a ALL ALIKE! US tanke®s ve®e "hott rrrrod ki(d)tts"... "back ya®d mechanics"... They vould take pa®ts frrrom a ch(j)unke®a, o®a von dat vass disablet, und soon dey vass fightin(g)k vis itt again!

I looked at the gobbledegook I created, so I will translate: Hans said: "Our tanks were built by "watch makers" and it was constant learning about tolerances in the heat of the desert. Our tanks would sieze up and there may not have been another one around like it. On the other hand, American tanks were everywhere. They were ALL ALIKE! US tankers were "hot rod kids"... "back yard mechanics"... They would take parts from a junker or one that was disabled, and soon they was fighting with it again!

My friend Hans was an impeccable machinist and REALLY knew what he was doing in a machine shop.

I've placed a picture of my only WWII service. I guess I was a washout as an ace pilot? Yes... I wish I still had the airplane.

Gary ;) NG28720961

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Well, I've done the military thing. I'll get back to farm equipment. Ralph, you or anyone else post away with your military stuff. I always have time for our boys in uniform and the stuff they work with.

The first picture is one Tom Madden sent me of a very rare pre-"Cat". I believe it is part of the Bouris collection and is a 75hp Best Tracklayer. This is pre-Caterpillar, or Holt merger by about 10 years.

The second picture was taken at Brady, Montana and shows a 110hp Case disking, seeding and packing grain.

The third picture is one I took of the Smolik Brother's 110hp Case at Cedar Falls, Iowa. Actually, I'd noticed the 1957 Chevy that wasn't yet a year old! There appears to be a Studebaker or Packard of about 1957 vintage beyond the Chevy. They pulled a gag with this steam engine at this show like I've never seen since, elsewhere. There was a little old "bathtub" Nash parked in a strategic location in the middle of the showgrounds. The master of ceremonies was in "cohoots" with the engineer and the people with the Nash. The steam engine ran up to the back end of the Nash with the right driver wheel. They stopped the steam engine and an "argument" ensued between the steam engineer and the "owner" of the Nash, and his "wife." The MC joined in, getting the crowd to converge and said things like "you need to move that car", "we have an argument going on" and things of that nature. There was even an attorney in the crowd, who told the MC he could maybe help the situation? Pretty soon, the engineer spouted his last words and opened the throttle on the huge Case steam engine. He drove that engine up onto the trunk, onto the top, smashing it down below the doors and onto the hood. Then he backed it off, as if he'd kept going, it would have done damage to his water tanks and bunkers. The crowd was astounded at what happened, before they found out it had been "set-up".

The last picture is kind of important to me. It shows the brothers who used to own my 15hp Case steam engine, when it "grew up" in a sawmill near Lincoln (adopted home of Ted Kazinsky), Montana. Walter Mehmke, who owned the engine at this time is shown petting a "kitty" in the back of the tender.

Gary ;)

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It may have been gobbledegook but it was fun reading it. :lol:

M Diesel,

You are very kind!

This first picture is of a late Remington steam engine, about the time Best had bought the company. I always like the threshing pictures with the crews posing.

The second picture is one of an Avery Alberta & Saskatchewan Special 30hp undermounted steam engine plowing at Belgrade, Montana about 1990. My friend Don Bradley of Forsyth, Montana built this engine out of the pieces of twenty (three?) some different Avery engines, all around the country. I got to run it and although I'd hate to have to operate it to feed my family, it was sure fun for one round. He was pulling an Avery self lift engine plow.

The third postcard picture is one of a 15hp Case and tender, much like my Case and tender. This one is threshing. I never understood the building in front of the strawstack?

Gary ;)

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This first picture is one of JI Case #1 at a Case Company show in the early 1950s. A book, When Steam Was King, transpired from this occasion. I think it is a very great thing this engine still exists and could be run, if desired. It now lives at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C.

I took the second picture of Case #1 at the Smithsonian in 1964.

The third is an old scan of the first JI Case gas tractor in 1892.

The fourth picture is one of George Bradley's 15hp Case steam engine hauling logs to his sawmill near Forsyth, in Montana's Rosebud country. The Bradley's put this engine together out of parts from two or three other engines. Even "back then" rural handymen kept things going, when they'd have rather had the money to buy a new one.

Gary ;)

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Hi Gary. Thanks for your military story and thanks to you and your son for serving. I was wondering when you were in. I almost got drafted in 63 & 64 but didn't bacause of medical reasons. A neighbor boy I graduated with got drafted and went to Nam. Talking about tanks, did you ever know about the WWII Sherman tanks with the 5 Chrysler flat head 6 cyl. motors put together to form one big motor? 250 cu. in. each, 1250 cu. in., 450 HP., 450 ft. lbs. of torque. Later ones had 500 HP. and 500 FT. LBS. of torque. Two of the motors could go down and it was still considered operational, fight on three of them. It had a 5 speed truck trany. I guess that is another story but my son took me to Detroit in 2000. We went to the Walter P. Chrysler museum. That motor is sitting there on display. I had just read about it in Mopar Action magazine so I knew what it was. I took a lot of pictures of it. To me it is a thing of beauty. I shure would like to hear one run, headers and big dualls. I think that one is the only one. They were shot up in the war and left. This one was found in South America and they had a heck of a time bring it into the USA getting it thru costoms. What Hans said about the Panzer tanks being precision buit, I have read the same thing. It took a 5 man matenane crew just to keep one running. Every so many hours it had to be started up and run for 20 mns. Had one man with a stop watch and he blew a whistle when it was time to start and stop. It was a lot easier to keep that Chrysler running and a lot better gas milage. I worked with a guy at Firestone, Hap was a long time friend of Dads, who drove a tank in WWII in Europe. I never thought back then to ask him about it. I am a Mopar nut and love the flat head sixes. Grew up with them, owned them and learned my machanic work on them. Thanks. Charley.

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Charley,

Others who read this thread may think differently, but my favorite part is learning all of the stuff everyone else contributes to it. It just makes my day to see or hear something I never knew about. I wasn't aware of that Chrysler multiple block engine used in the Sherman tanks. I sure hope you are able to scan and place some pictures of that engine on here sometime. I'd love to see them. I've not had much experience with Chrysler products, other than running some Massey-Harris combines that had Chrysler industrial engines in them. I had an uncle who drove Chrysler products, but didn't spend much time with him and only rode in his car a time or two. His brother in law was our neighbor and he owned a couple of Dodge pickups, but I never spent time with him either. I was really taken by some other neighbors, who had kids who attended the one room Glengarry School I attended for eight years. They had a Dodge Power Wagon that was war surplus and of the military variety, not the later ones of the later 1940s another neighbor drove. This 3/4 ton Power Wagon had a military bed still as a box on the rear. It had several bullet holes in the sides of the box. That was really awesome to us boys who grew up on the coat tails of WWII. They didn't have to make up any stories... Our minds did that for us! My cousin is married to a man who drove a half track during WWII and the Battle of the Bulge. I should go the eight hours to Billings and visit him further about that. He's getting older.

I do have a little connection with later MoPar, though... From late 1969 through July 1974, I was a bodyman and head painter at Billings Chrysler-Plymouth. I still have most of my equipment I used there, but was urged by the doctor to get out of there while I was still living, as I was working on the alternative, painting with catalized acrylic enamels.

Gary

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Hi Gary. That picture of blowing the straw around the building looks like something Grandpas nieghbor across the road up at Britt did. Grandpa did his threshing. He had a pole framework set up in the barnyard near the front of the barn with a flat top. Parked the thresher in the barnyard near it and blew the straw on top of it and around it. Used it for a winter shelter building, hogs I think. It didn't have a big door, went from ground to top in the southwest corner. One long side faced south. It wasn't to tall. Charley.

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Charley, since you are a flathead six fan I should post a pic of the Fargo my brother and nephews hauled home a year ago. But for now I have this recent summer storm shot showing the old Red River Special threshing machine that sits in my cattle pasture. The cattle find it to be a good scratching post. :lol:

The other pic is a nicely restored Case S for the guys on here that like the old Case tractors. This one was in the parade in town summer of 05. Thats the owner driving it. A retired farmer.

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This first is a cut from an Aultman-Taylor catalog I have. My friend in Ohio owns the postcard with this same engine plowing and it says it is in Montana.

The second is a picture I took of my grain cradle, or as the Keller's called it "reaper" when they gave it to me, out in a snowbank. It is very delicate and has some "farmer" repairs, but they really make it. I've left it the way I got it.

The third picture is of a Case with Woolf trunk compound, has unusual hanging valve gear and I like any picture of the threshing crew posing. My good friend, the late Tom Stebritz of Algona, Iowa gave me a good bunch of the old pictures I have. This is one of them.

The third picture shows an old 25hp Case steam engine threshing here in Montana, but I really like the wooden water tank wagon being used here.

The last picture is another of our Montana Indians of years past. Ironically, my grandfather befriended many trapping and hunting Indians when he homesteaded in the Judith Basin in 1881. Grandma came from Switzerland in 1883 and they got married in June of 1884. She had some, but not a lot of contact with her family in CH. When that generation was gone, the only reputation Grandma had for her family there, was "She went to America and lived where there were only Indians!" When my wife wrote her book about Grandma and Grandpa from 1995-2000, we made contact with family in Switzerland and they told us that. One cousin and her son even came to America to visit us, due to that project.

Gary

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Gary, while I"m waiting for the 56-57 Chev to fall into my hands I will make do with this original one owner 63 Chevy II. Its just a plain jane four door sedan with the 194 six and three on the tree but still a nice vintage ride. An added bonus, its the cheapest vehicle on gas that I own. :D

I only license it for summer months. Scared of the winter salt eating up the fenders.

The thumbnail picture up top is how it looked when new in the summer of 64. Lower photo is how it looked in the summer of 05.

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Gary, the picture of the plane at the bottom of page 93 reminds me of something that happened 1 1/2 years ago. Went to a sale and a nice, nice example of a plane like that was on it. It even had a kid size leather jacket and cap with googles with it. When it came time to sell they worked for a bit and said if someone would bid $400.00 they would sell same to them. I obliged and with that they kept crying for more---------someone bid $425.00 and just like that it was sold. Always thought it was a no sale. It was the nearest thing and probably worth all of that amount of money.

Nice S Case and a very nice chevy!!

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Gentlemen: I happened to catch a show on The History Channel about a month ago entitled "Combat Mechanic" and they just happened to be working on Sherman Tanks. They gave quite a history of them, and everything mentioned so far has been correct. There was a version with Cadillac V-8's. Two engines and two transmissions per tank. That was deemed to be too complex to be workable. The Chrysler 30 cylinder engine proved to be too expensive. GM had a few prototypes with twin diesels of some kind. Possibly early toro-flo's. Again too expensive and not dependable enough. Henry Ford finally came up with an 840+ cubic inch V-8 that saved the day. If I remember right this is the Ford "GAA" engine. This engine powered the vast majority of the Shermans produced. The downside was that the engine ran on aviation fuel and was very flamable. :o

Hence the nickname "Ronson" after the cigarette lighter of the same name. I have a friend that has one of these engines sitting in his shop. He had it running once and said the noise was mind numbing. I'll try to get some pics one of these days.

I spent 22 years in the South Dakota Army National Guard, and got to mess with tracked vehicles too.

M-110A2 self propelled 8 inch howitzer. Turbo'd 8V-71 Detroit with an Allison automatic. (Steered with handle bars like a snowmobile :huh: )

Thanks for the thread, it's great.

Mikem

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Ralph,

That is one beautiful automobile. You could park that in my shop ANY day. I'd love to have one equipped like that one. I'm awaiting your placing the picture of the Fargo here!

Charley,

Speaking of Hans, I also remember his mentioning that you could almost put "a penny" down alongside a piston while in the cylinder on those Sherman engines. He said, "dat vasn't qvality", but it was the reason they didn't seize up in the desert.

My first picture is another of the late Tom Stebritz's photos, showing an early Aultman-Taylor return flue steam engine threshing. There is something about old engines that have wooden barrels setting there. They did that for a little extra water, should the water wagon get held up due to something unforseen. I always loved the old wooden barrels that set around our farm when I was a boy. Several of them were for curing hams, and kept in the "fruit room" in our basement. The fruit room didn't have a cement floor, as the rest of the basement had. I guess that must have had something to do with storing canned goods?

The second picture is one of a small, likely around 10hp, Advance steam engine here in the Flathead Valley. It is quite an early engine, as it only has one row of rivets down the side of the boiler barrel. Boiler inspectors really frown on them today.

The third picture is of an Ames Iron Works return flue steam engine threshing in near the buildings. Notice the two raddle stackers at the back of the thresher. The lower one is part of the thresher. The upper or rear one is an accessory used to place straw higher. I don't know if it is a Reeves or not, but that stacker was the first or second item Reeves & Company built, even before they built threshers and long before they built steam engines.

The fourth picture is a human interest picture I couldn't resist putting here. Human beings pitched, were separator men, and made agriculture. Carl Kalness was just another person of that era with a job to do. He was firing this undermounted Avery threshing and he is here posing for the camera, while rolling himself a cigarette. The picture was taken near Larimore, North Dakota.

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Ralph,

That is one beautiful automobile. You could park that in my shop ANY day. I'd love to have one equipped like that one. I'm awaiting your placing the picture of the Fargo here!

He was firing this undermounted Avery threshing and he is here posing for the camera, while rolling himself a cigarette. The picture was taken near Larimore, North Dakota.

Thanks Gary, I enjoy driving the little Chevy too and being that its been in the family since new I value it even more. I'm attaching a pic of the day we hauled the Fargo home. Cold day in February of 05 I believe. The boys had some fun working on it and finally got the engine un seized and run but its come to a standstill lately. Good rust free truck though and would make a nice driver.

Those old hand rolled cigarettes like the one in your last picture remind me of the older generatiion too. My Dad used to roll his own mainly because it was more economical than the "store bought " kind. They must have cost over a dollar a pack and were considered a luxury. He quit cold turkey after 30+ years of smoking and never went back to it.

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Chub,

I'm glad you liked the fighter pilot and his plane. We only had about 150 feet of sidewalk, so that was the limiting factor with it. I couldn't get airborn in that short of distance. I think they considered taking it into Grandma's house at Lewistown, but figured I'd probably "mow down" little ladies on the sidewalk, with me not comprehending the effect of the width???

Mikem,

thanks so much for your contributions of the Sherman tank. I'd never heard about that huge Ford V-8. That howitzer looks like some kind of mean thing! I never spent much time around artillery, but it sure fascinated me how they could hit something so directly, so far away and out of sight. Thank you for your service.

I put a picture of my son Mike on in his Army dress blues. It is difficult to tell, but Granddad knows... Jake had just saluted. He salutes the US flag when he and dad put it up in their front yard too. Mike has been part of the honor guard for burials several times, a thing which nobody likes doing. I just bumped into this picture looking for the next picture, so I just put it here.

The next picture is of all of my parent's grandchildren. Randy, my nephew and oldest, is holding my now nearly 33 year year old daughter Mevanie. In the back row is Larayne at left and Ralph at right, all brother Bills kids. My oldest daughter Michaelle is at left in front and Mike is at right. I put all of that here, as I needed to post a picture of Randy and he is now 50, so this isn't representative of today. He went through armor training as did Mike, me and his dad. He and his dad also went through flight school at Fort Rucker, Alabama. Mike was a Huey and OH58 crew chief when regular Army, trained at Fort Rucker. Bill was a Master Aviator and qualified in eight fixed and rotary wing Army aircraft. Randy also became a Major and was the commander of the Aviation unit of the Montana Army National Guard, as his dad had been also. There wasn't a spot for him after that assignment, so he reverted to a Warrant Officer and just flies now!

He was also the Montana Highway Patrol's "Bear in the Air" for twenty years and is the immediate past Chief of the Montana Highway Patrol. (I apologize if some of you had met him in that manner over the years.) The last time I asked him, he was here in Kalispell flying a Super Huey (standard bucket Huey with a Huey Cobra motor) bucket chopper fighting fires for the Montana Department of State Lands, and he said he had "over 9,000, pushing 10,000 hours flight time." I've said all of this to say the following:

The morning of 9-11-2001, after all airspace was closed, Randy, as Assistant Chief of the MHP, had flown himself and the Chief of the MHP to a regional meeting in North Dakota. Our governor wanted them back in the state of Montana and got clearance for them to fly back to Helena. He said it felt funny knowing he was piloting the only aircraft in flight in the whole USA at that time.

Gary ;)

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Hi Ralph. Thanks. You bet, I am an old Dodge trucker, love the old Dodge trucks. My first truck was a 47 Dodgr 1/2 ton when i ws 17. Grandpa bought a new 52 Dodge 2 ton just before Christmas 52. He bought it at Ames IA., traded in an old IH. It had a 5 spd., Eaton 2 spd. rear end., 8.25 x 20 tires and big springs, 13 i/2 ft. Omaha Standard wood combination box with the fold down stock racks. The rear end sat in the middle of the box. It didn't come with the box, he put it on. Grandpa and my older Uncle Ervin stopped on the way home and took with them for Christmas vacation. I spent all my summers and Easter and Christmas vacations on the farm with Grandpa and my 2 uncles, Ervin and Elvin. I told Mother not long ago, I don't know what I would have done without Grandpa and the farm. I didn't like town. When I was 16 and school was out in 59 I drove myself to Grandpa's, only 30 miles that year and i stayed. Mother said I could if I finnished school. I went to Waukee my last two years. I collect Case stuff and a little other. That is agood looking Case S. It is something how we have met up here and our Dads. Glad to know you. One Fathers Day I was given a big hard bound book of Dodge trucks. It shows every truck they made, they made some I didn't know about. Thanks for posting your Dad's Army picture. I mispelled the other time, Dad's Army papers listed him at 6 ft. 1 inch-163 lbs. I always thought he was 6 ft. the same as I. Mother did too. Mother used to make real good flannel shirts, she was good at sewing things up and so is my sister. She made the same size for Dad, my brother and I. Now I can't wear them. Thanks. Charley.

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Hi Mikem. I didn't know about that big Ford V8 or the two caddy motored deal. That would be a good show to see. Thanks for your service. My Dad was in the Engineers and the Infintre in Newguine and the Phillippines. He said they had big saw mills with two Chrysler motors on them. He helped build air strips. Thanks. Charley.

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Ralphh, that is a nice truck! At first glance in the small pic it almost looked IH but then Dodge. The hood ornament is very much Dodge. Hard to see but "Ram" to me. Looks to be in good shape. Cleaned up and running would be worth of parading.

Charley, last threshing for me was mid 1940's. Dad had his own machine and it went to Minnesota when he sald same.........a small IH. Came to an end in area in late 1940's in this area when a fire burned the man's binder canvases.

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Ralph,

I really like that Fargo. It was a lot like the Dodge pickup one of our neighbors had when I was a kid. If I owned it, I'd be tempted to make a limited driver out of it.

I'm putting a picture of a couple of old Dodge "tractor-trailer" logging trucks on here. Maybe they're too old for you Charley, but it is the best I could come up with here. They were owned by Evans Logging out of Judith Gap, Montana and they were working the foothills of the Big Snowy Mountains, east of the gap.

I know I place a picture repeatedly here and don't mean to, so I hope this isn't one of them.

I think our last year to thresh may have been 1951 or 52. I got to "help" shock (stook) bundles and Dad used the Farmall M to turn the 28" McCormick Deering separator.

Gary ;)

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