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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy
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Gary, speaking of sheep, have you ever seen a shearing machine like this? My Dad's Uncle , Aunt, and cousin are working here with a hand cranked shearer back in the early thirties I am estimating.

One to shear, one to hold the sheep and one to turn the crank on the shearer. There were not many sheep raised in this area in those days.

Ralph,

I've seen those hand cranked clippers, but never in use. That's a great picture. We had an old upright, water cooled, gas engine in our "scale house" shed that had arms on it for mounting sheep shears. I know Dad and his brothers used it in the very olden days. During the time I remember, we used to have the Hutterites come with their crew and shear. There was a crew from the south that used to come to my uncle's place to shear the sheep in the photo. Ralph... You brought me Baaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaack to this subject!

SORRY THE PHOTOS GOT SCRAMBLED...

The third picture shows Seth Eddy's Reeves steam engine after it fell through the bridge. The second photo shows the bottom side of the Reeves.

The fourth picture is of stack threshing on the Anderson farm again. This picture was taken in 1953 and shows a nice looking International L-110 pickup under the separator spout.

The first picture was a fuzzy picture so it isn't enlarged much. It was in Grandma's photo album and shows uncle Frank on the loose haystack, our "Palouse" hill in the background, plus the harnessed horse and Overshot hay stacker.

Gary ;)

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The fourth picture is of stack threshing on the Anderson farm again. This picture was taken in 1953 and shows a nice looking International L-110 pickup under the separator spout.

Gary ;)

Gary, thats a nice threshing shot with the L truck in it. I would hope its at least an L120 or 130 with those side boards on the box. My brother has an L-130 set up just like that. The previous owner used to haul grain ten miles to town with it. Right around 90 bushels if I recall right.

Your big truck picture a few posts back kind of reminds me of this one that my friend in B.C. sent me from a summer time vintage farm machinery show. The name on the rad is "Hayes Anderson" which is a new one to me. Big tough looking old truck though.

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This first picture is one taken in May of 1939 at Whitefish, Montana, showing the GNRY #1 passenger pulled by engine #2508. This stunning depot is still in use and has had extensive remodeling done. It was sold to the Stumptown Historical Society for $1 and is leased back to the present RR company.

The second picture is a postcard of mine that has a lot of family historical meaning. This is the Tiefengletch Hotel at Tiefenbach, which is at a very high elevation on the Furkastrasse in Switzerland. This hotel was abandoned in winter, but was opened by my grandmother's family each spring and ran until the snows of fall. There are several roads leading into France, Germany and Italy from this point and they owned the horses and stagecoaches that transported people through that area. That is the tiefengletcher or "glacier" behind the hotel. During WWI, their horses were consficated by the German Second Reich and they never received them back, nor conpensation for them. There was real bad "feelings" in grandma's side of the family over this devastating stunt.

The last picture is a postcard picture of Emerson disk plows behind a Rumely steam engine. Notice the engine is taking on water, while everyone poses for the picture.

Gary

Is this the biggest thread yet? LOL :P

Aaron

Aaron,

I couldn't tell you whether it is "biggest" or not. I am a relative newcomer, and have heard there was a real big one several years (many months) ago? I just started posting this last fall, sometime. I just have a bunch more stuff to post.

A question for you... I notice you have a 1939 Farmall H. What is your tractor's serial number? I've got a 1939 Farmall H too and I'm just curious.

Gary ;)

Sorry you must have misread it... mine is a 1943. I can double check though.

Aaron

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Aaron, I must have just had a senior moment. I can see that. I don't know why I thought yours was a 1939 model when it says 1943 at the bottom of your page. Sorry!

Ralph,

That L-line pickup sure looks like it has half-ton wheels and hubcaps on it. We had five L-line pickups in our family; two 110s and three120s. The 3/4 ton 120 looks much more brawny. My son had a L-120 with the 1-ton package too. I'm just going from memory and I've demonstrated my "memory" here from time to time, but that one I feel pretty confident with. With the F-350 Ford my wife inherited from her dad, he had boards like these for wheat... approximately 90-100 bushel, and some "tip top" boards he put on top of those for hauling oats and it seems like he hauled 110-120 bushels of oats.

SORRY FOR THE SCREWED UP ORDER OF PHOTOS...

That is a nice looking Sawyer-Massey portable steam engine back there hooked to the Farmall A! That Hayes Anderson has to be a scarce truck?? I've never ever heard of one of them. It looks to be in pretty fancy shape too.

The second picture shows a 32hp Reeves cross compound Canadian Special engine threshing near Ryegate, Montana, just south of the Judith Basin.

The third is a picture of a steam engine powering a sawmill near Whitefish, Montana, where I work five days a week.

The fourth picture is of the Fergus County Courthouse in Lewistown. The Spanish style courthouse is still an elegant building and was built in 1908. This picture was in my aunt's things when she died. Does anyone have any idea what kind of sedan that is parked there. During this mid-1920 era of automobiles, there were many that looked much alike to me.

The first is a picture of a 13hp Gaar Scott steam engine threshing on Lias Parker's place.

Gary ;)

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Gary wrote:Chub,

I haven't looked at a map, but I went to SmokStak.com and found out the Peerless is near Carthage, NC. If you wanted to give me a PM, I'd send along a little more information.

Have looked it up om the map and doable whether you fly or drive, chub

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[quote name='Old Binder

Aaron,

I couldn't tell you whether it is "biggest" or not. I am a relative newcomer, and have heard there was a real big one several years (many months) ago? I just started posting this last fall, sometime. I just have a bunch more stuff to post.

Gary, don't know if this is the thread or not, but way back when (before the coffee shop) there was a thread called "It's planting time, wheres the rain" that ran something over 12 month, maybe even 14 or more, but there wasn't very many members on here then. Some that I remember was Boog, Chub, JP, Jere (JD) Red Reaper, Blaine Griggs, SD Man, Ken Updike, and many more but CRS has struck again. It was interesting at the time to have "live time" day to day crop/planting information which as I said, went on into sumer, fall harvest, etc, etc. This thread I am talking about in no way had the number of views that your very interesting thread has to date, and there is no doubt that your steam thread may go way longer than the planting thread, and I hope it does because I am really enjoying learning things about how steam was used in agriculture. I can barely remember my grandfather having a steam engine and thrashing machine (don't have a clue as to wha tthey were) and later I remember him threshing with a D John Deere for the power unit.

Please keep on posting the pictures and great information. I think this is one of the all time best threads that have been on here, and there have been some good ones, one that comes to mind is Blaine's trips driving tractors he had purchased home from 300+ miles out. We are blessed to have some on here that can spell ;) and can paint a picture with words. :D

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Chub,

When you get closer to going to Carthage, let me know and I can get more particulars. There will be a big public show at this privately owned museum (300 tractors-not the rubber tire type-[60 steam], all very old and just bought a steam railroad engine) will be in November. I hope to make it back some year myself.

H-D,

You are very kind with your remarks. I hope I can continue to measure up to the scrutiny! Regarding steam, I guess I'm a "throwback" link to the past. My dad was a real engineer and made sure I knew how to operate and repair them before he passed on. I will be spending at least a week at my son's place near Helena this summer, working on the 20hp Reeves he and my nephew bought from Carl Mehmke's Museum near Great Falls. Fortunately, Dad left me with his specialized tools and equipment needed for such projects.

Since I can't seem to post without at least one photo, this picture is of Carl Mehmke with the 20 Reeves in the 1970s, with snow on the ground.

Gary ;)

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Ralph,

That L-line pickup sure looks like it has half-ton wheels and hubcaps on it. We had five L-line pickups in our family; two 110s and three120s. The 3/4 ton 120 looks much more brawny. My son had a L-120 with the 1-ton package too. I'm just going from memory and I've demonstrated my "memory" here from time to time, but that one I feel pretty confident with. With the F-350 Ford my wife inherited from her dad, he had boards like these for wheat... approximately 90-100 bushel, and some "tip top" boards he put on top of those for hauling oats and it seems like he hauled 110-120 bushels of oats..

Gary ;)

Of course you are right Gary. That truck does look like it has the solid disc wheels, not the budds like my brother's L-130 has. He also has a parts L120 with the same Budd wheels. I used to have a picture of an old friend's L-110 hauling wheat from the field back in the fifties when it was a relatively new truck. That old IH did everything from hauling grain, cattle, etc . to driving to church on sunday.

I do have a picture of it but it will have to wait for another time.

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That is a nice looking Sawyer-Massey portable steam engine back there hooked to the Farmall A! That Hayes Anderson has to be a scarce truck?? I've never ever heard of one of them. It looks to be in pretty fancy shape too.

Gary ;)

Gary, I wondered if you might notice the background machinery there in that photo of mine. I have several more from the same show which I will try to show a few examples of. No, I've never heard of a Hayes Anderson truck either but there it is large as life.

Speaking of trucks it reminds me of the truck I learned to drive on before I was old enough to get a drivers license. This old 46 Ford of Dad's had gone into semi retirement after he bought a 150 bushel hopper wagon and trailer to haul the grain from the combine. The old truck was well used and could be a little unreliable and stubborn to start. I learned a lot about getting and keeping old vehicles running with this truck. Made a lot of miles but never too fast or far from home.

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Ralph,

It looks like you had On The Job Training, like I had as a kid. We had an old IH D-30 with a lever actuated Eaton two speed and sadly I don't have a picture of it. I also barely have a picture of the old post war IH K-5 Dad owned. It didn't have a piece of chrome anywhere. Every place my uncle's 1949 KB-5, with vacuum operated Eaton two speed rear end, had chrome; Dad's K-5 had cream colored paint. Those three trucks taught me much about checking coils, condensors, float levels and battery connections, when the darn things wouldn't start or keep running. I'm lost under the hood of my pickup today. I can check fluid levels, change oil & filters and sparkplugs every 50 thousand miles.

I have two more pictures of my uncle who must have worked for the road department down in Kansas years ago. Again, I don't know what these trucks are.

Well, I don't know how this is going to turn out, as I lost my internet connection and had to back up. Me & computers... ARGH!!!!!

I've mentioned TC Power enough times as my grandpa's employer and I'd mentioned Mom worked at this store, when Grandma had put up a help wanted ad on the Power Mercantile bulletin board and Mom went to work at the Yaeger farm. The first picture is earlier than the second. The first picture shows the near half block store, on two floors, on the Main Street or the front of the store. The second picture is taken on the Broadway street side and I love the older cars there. They remind me of my later grade school years, when I attended the one room school at Glengarrry. By the time this photo was taken, Sears & Roebuck occupied this Broadway end of the Power Block. More "rocks" in these buildings too, chub!

Gary ;)

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Wwent to SmokStak. com and had a enjoyable 1/2 hour with some really great pictures of steamers. Funny, there's a Gary on there too!!

I want to second H-D's words as well as others words of praise. With Gary and Ralph leading the way this has been an enjoyable trip.

The fourth picture is of stack threshing on the Anderson farm again. This picture was taken in 1953 and shows a nice looking International L-110 pickup under the separator spout.

Gary ;)

Gary, thats a nice threshing shot with the L truck in it. I would hope its at least an L120 or 130 with those side boards on the box. My brother has an L-130 set up just like that. The previous owner used to haul grain ten miles to town with it. Right around 90 bushels if I recall right.

Your big truck picture a few posts back kind of reminds me of this one that my friend in B.C. sent me from a summer time vintage farm machinery show. The name on the rad is "Hayes Anderson" which is a new one to me. Big tough looking old truck though.

Go to http://www.lino.com/~marcelg/hayes_an.htm for one look at Hayes Anderson.

Try Hayes Anderson Trucks and search. Lots on google.

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In regards to the hand crank sheep shearer my dad had one [long gone] and so did my wifes family. Her family's was sold at their estate sale and many years later a friend told me "I have something I'll bet you'd like". Sure enough the sheep shearer. He insisted on giving it to me and my wife. A couple years ago I took it to our Retired Iron exhibit @ the county fair and one of my wife's brothers came in and says "Dad had one of them". He was a little suprised when I said "That's it".

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Chub,

You found an impersonator over there? You should watch out for him, as he thinks he was named after Helena, Montana native, Gary Cooper. I know I was!

Thanks for your encouragement too. As a kid, I was very introverted and am still bashful behind a live microphone. I even S-S-Stutter a little from time to time; but not on a computer, if I can keep the darn thing running.

Ralph, I mentioned an International L-120 with a factory 1-Ton upgrade that my son Mike once owned. I thought, and still think, I have a better picture of the pickup, but I don't know where. This picture was one of those with the orange flare at the end of the roll, so I put it into black & white, so it wouldn't look like a flare had been lit in our faces. I purposely kept the TV antenna in this picture. The rest of the world has cable or dish TV, but they don't and neither do his mom and dad. Actually, we don't have a microwave either. It's not that we didn't have one years ago when they first came out. My wife doesn't like the idea of the "rays", so I have to reheat coffee in a pan on the stove! I wonder if she is also afraid it may make her husband sterile? :rolleyes:

The second picture is of me, grandson Jacob and son Mike almost three years ago, when I first got my 1926 Model T Coupe running, for the first time in 38 years, and after restoration was nearly completed. Jake and his sister Heather were both indigenous Guatemalan (Mayan) and adopted by Pam and Mike. They are very both "sharper than tacks" very special to all of us.

Taken about 38 years prior, in 1964, my father in-law Lynn Simpson is taking his wife Cleo for a ride in my Model T Coupe. Notice my B-100 IH pickup, our 1964 Pontiac Catalina and I think Lynn's green Ford Galaxy was a 1964 too.

Lynn is shown with his 1926 Model T Tudor Ford after high school and this was his car, during VERY hard times of the dirty thirties. Regardless, he didn't have to have any lessons to learn how to push the three pedals of the planetary transmission on my Model T.

Gary ;)

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Wow. Many great photos today!

OBG, those triple buckle saddle bags bring back a lot of memories from when I was little. Dad has photos of his '47 and '58 DuoGlide and I think there was a '54 in there somewhere. And Gomers Sporster. Gomer got a lot of ribbing for riding a weenie bike. And them megaphone pipes. :lol: Dad says one of the guys rode past Silas Martins general store one day and cracked the glass, and another time rattled a jug of antifreeze off the window sill. Silas would get peeved to say the least, and then would give Dad guff about it, because it was one of Dads motersickle friends. Them consarned young uns. <_<:lol:

Another thing about them pipes. Dad says when I was wee little guy (when your age is in months) and was fussy and couldn't sleep, he would take me for a ride on the Harley. (When I was born he bought an oversized belt that he used to keep me in place on the front of the seat.) Apparently a ride would put me out like a light switch. He said only problem was sometimes I would nod off after only 1/4 or 1/2 mile and he would have to turn around and take me back to the house. :lol: To this day I remember many a day of him kicking it over and me climbing up on the seat. Then grabbing the bars cause the gas caps were too slick to hold on to. The heat from the engine, the primary chain whirring, gas tanks thumping, putting one foot on the air cleaner for a footpeg on one side and the primary cover on the other, turning towards the highway, clutch cable pinching my hand against the bar, rolling down the gravel driveway, hitting the pavement, turning it loose and going through the gears with that motor rumbling louder than all tarnation. Life couldn't get no better. B)

That L110 also brings up memories. While growing up a neighbor had one since new, and we spent a lot of time in it. As teenagers a friend and I kinda bought one together for $35. I remember gas welding a lot of sheet metal as them big overhanging fenders weren't supported very well. Did the 120 and 130 have the same engines as standard or was something bigger used?

HD: I thought that thread would never end. It just sort of puttered along forever...... :lol:

OBG: Don't apologize for the photo order. Your descriptions are plenty enough to identify them.

Finally: Wasn't there a TD or PTO powered sheep shear on the construction board? :rolleyes: I can't find the picture <_< but Tool Time Tim Allen wudda been proud. :lol:

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The first picture is of my wife's uncle Wayne pushing her dad in his "car" at their homestead near Moore(Eddie's Corner), Montana about 1915. That's a cute little car. I don't know the story behind it, but I wish I had it.

The second picture is another of my father in-law in 1964, driving my Model T Coupe. Notice the white interior and top. Thank goodness, this was the stage it went to blocks in the back of an old shed, otherwise, I'd have likely done more "hot rodding" to it? I never put the cutting torch to it, so it was an easy restoration in that respect. I spent most all free time for a year and a half when I restored it about three years ago. Since I've owned that car for over 53 years, I'm kind of attached to it.

The third picture is another of Lynn and the 1929 Model A Coupe he bought himself after the Model T Tudor Sedan.

The last picture is of Lynn and his 1934 Ford Fordor Sedan on a bird hunting trip up Beaver Creek, above our farm, on his brother in-law's place. Notice the Judith Mountains in the far background at right. And even more sad to us is the 12 Gauge Montgomery-Ward pump shotgun, by his foot, which ended his life at age 78.

Gary ;)

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Wow. Many great photos today!

OBG, those triple buckle saddle bags bring back a lot of memories from when I was little. Dad has photos of his '47 and '58 DuoGlide and I think there was a '54 in there somewhere. And Gomers Sporster. Gomer got a lot of ribbing for riding a weenie bike. And them megaphone pipes. :lol: Dad says one of the guys rode past Silas Martins general store one day and cracked the glass, and another time rattled a jug of antifreeze off the window sill. Silas would get peeved to say the least, and then would give Dad guff about it, because it was one of Dads motersickle friends. Them consarned young uns. <_<:lol:

Another thing about them pipes. Dad says when I was wee little guy (when your age is in months) and was fussy and couldn't sleep, he would take me for a ride on the Harley. (When I was born he bought an oversized belt that he used to keep me in place on the front of the seat.) Apparently a ride would put me out like a light switch. He said only problem was sometimes I would nod off after only 1/4 or 1/2 mile and he would have to turn around and take me back to the house. :lol: To this day I remember many a day of him kicking it over and me climbing up on the seat. Then grabbing the bars cause the gas caps were too slick to hold on to. The heat from the engine, the primary chain whirring, gas tanks thumping, putting one foot on the air cleaner for a footpeg on one side and the primary cover on the other, turning towards the highway, clutch cable pinching my hand against the bar, rolling down the gravel driveway, hitting the pavement, turning it loose and going through the gears with that motor rumbling louder than all tarnation. Life couldn't get no better. B)

That L110 also brings up memories. While growing up a neighbor had one since new, and we spent a lot of time in it. As teenagers a friend and I kinda bought one together for $35. I remember gas welding a lot of sheet metal as them big overhanging fenders weren't supported very well. Did the 120 and 130 have the same engines as standard or was something bigger used?

HD: I thought that thread would never end. It just sort of puttered along forever...... :lol:

OBG: Don't apologize for the photo order. Your descriptions are plenty enough to identify them.

Finally: Wasn't there a TD or PTO powered sheep shear on the construction board? :rolleyes: I can't find the picture <_< but Tool Time Tim Allen wudda been proud. :lol:

M Diesel,

Not only do I owe you for helping me finally get on youtube.com, but this is the kind of contribution that makes me smile. Thanks for writing your Harley exepriences to us. It is appreciated. It is so much easier to bounce things off of others. Talk about stupid.... I don't ever remember getting beaten with my Harley. I remember a 1959 Corvette and a TriPowered Pontiac that had to try me too. Also, there is a 4-mile straight stretch between my uncle Audie's place and Moore, Montana. I remember it taking most of that straight stretch to finally beat the circa 1957 Cadillac that day, but I did 'er. Again... Not real proud, looking back on that. That is placing a lot of faith in the tires and the hopes nobody else would show up on approaching me on my side of the road. Kids... Do what's right, not what I did

My uncle's IH L-120 had a SD-220 or a BD-220 engine, I think. I know our 1957 A-120 had a BD-240. I'm hopeful someone will come on and straighten me out, as some little things get lost in the cobwebs of my noggin at times.

Please try to find that powered sheep shear you spoke of. It sounds interesting. Maybe we can keep this thread puttering along for a little while longer too? B)

Gary ;)

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OBG: Thanks for the words, but it was mostly for you and a few others that would bother to read one of my posts. :lol: Thanks for the engine info. Harrison was proud of his SD220, it was smooth as a sewing machine, but got terrible gas mileage though.

Being a family tradition, have done a bit of hot rodding around myself. Nothing really side by side cause it usually didn't last that long. I never instigated anything, but I liked to build strong cars and fast bikes, and pride won't let you lose to a cheeseball with poser attachments that decides to show you his stuff. :blush: Like you, it all seems a bit silly now. Mostly I just liked to be on a bike and work the curvy roads. :) Where I live now there are't any, so I got away from the pavement and went into desert racing for a while. It's a place where you can take on challenges at any pace you can stand. It's an outlet that vents agression and brings peace of mind. ^_^

The sheep shear thread is still there, but the pics are gone. Sheep shear

Maybe somebody else has them. It was belt powered or something, and therefore easily "upgraded". :lol:

PS: Thanks to LoadStar and chub and the others who contributed here. It's been a great read. ^_^

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This first steam engine was located in Montana's Gallatin Valley. It is a Jacob Price double cylinder steam engine and was owned by the Manhattan (Montana) Malting Company, over in the Gallatin Valley, near Bozeman, Montana. There was a story written in one of the steam magazines several years ago and I wish I could remember the information off of the top of my head. This engine and primitive plows plowed all one summer and I forget but it broke several thousand acres. It listed how many acres were plowed a day and it was phenomenal, as this was in the mid-1890s, before there were "plow engines" of any consequence. Most steam engines just were able to pull themselves around from threshing location to threshing location.

I'd only surmise the Manhattan Malting Company was somehow involved in an adult beverage market for their crops? I know that Montana is purported to raise some of the finest malting barley in the world and Anheuser-Busch is the largest purchaser of current malting barley crops.

I haven't put a picture of Cousin Dan's tractors here lately. My photo says 2005 on it, but I think Dan got this Farmall Super M from an uncle over east of the Rocky Mountains. It looks like a brand new Super M, like the type I'd have remembered sitting upon at Bourke Motor & Implement as a grade schooler.

I liked the IH truck that is hauling this 32hp US double simple Reeves steam engine in Oklahoma years ago in the fourth picture. This engine is owned by a friend in North Dakota now.

The fifth picture is of Milwaukee steam locomotive #60 at Harlowton, Montana years ago. This is likely one of the "teakettles" they operated on the Jawbone RR into Lewistown?

The last picture is of my Sweetie Pie on her bicycle, behind her dad's 1950 Ford.

Gary ;)

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This is another pictures of my wife, Sharon, on her bicycle in 1952. There is a GM automobile behind her and I don't know what it is, other than it is there from Judith Basin County, as they are county #36, on Montana license plates.

The second is a Chevy sedan, but I don't know the year? My guess would be 1935-37? How'd I do Ralph? It belonged to my uncle and he'd gone to my other uncle's ranch deer hunting.

The third picture is of a unique steam powered ice sled. I fully understand how it works, but water used to make steam and cold, which it'd better be for the ice depth, are a place I wouldn't care to go.

The last picture is another taken from the center elevator at Moore(Eddie's Corner), Montana and shows the Milwaukee Depot in the foreground. the tall building at right is one of two banks that were there until the late 1920s.

Gary ;)

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I'm putting this first picture of the oldest building in the Judith Basin, the Reed & Bowle's Trading Post, on the Carroll Trail, between Carroll landing and Helena, Montana Territory. The building is about two miles north of Lewistown, on Lower Spring Creek and located on what was once the Fergus County Poor Farm.

The second building is the 1880 Reedsfort Post Office, the second oldest building there. The Reedsfort Post Office was located on Casion Creek, near the confluence of Upper Spring Creek, about 10 blocks south of Main Street in Lewistown. The post office was changed to Lewistown in circa 1882 and Reedsfort was abandoned.

The third picture is of me with my Sweetie Pie in May of 1961 while I was leaving for Basic Training at Fort Ord, California. Yep, NG28720961! I wish I still had that 1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Sunliner convertible, but it is kind of like my old Harley... Gone!

The fourth is one our son Mike took of Sharon and me after I'd finished restoring (You're never done working on 'em!) my 1909 JI Case 15hp steam engine several years ago, when we lived near Whitefish, Montana.

Gary ;)

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I put a picture on yesterday, showing a Russell steam engine that was quite covered with gravel, after a flood. We had a Russell very much like that Russell, when I was younger at the homestead in the Judith Basin. This is a picture of it, HOWEVER, I noticed one of Dad's TD-40 TracTracTors over across our driveway. Also to the left is the old glass top gas pump, in front of the 1000 gallon diesel fuel tank. I used to pump bunches of 20 cent gas through that gas pump each summer.

How many of you old timers remember this scene in the second picture? This was Dorothy McGuire in the Friendly Persuasion, when she climbed aboard this Minneapolis steam engine looking for someone. I remember watching it when it came out at the long defunct Georgeanna Theater, which has been Cloyd's Funeral Home for over 45 years. My friend Dean Alling owns this Minneapolis down in southern California. It is restored very beautifully today. That funnel was put atop the smokestack in the picture, to make it look older than it was.

The last picture is kind of a neat picture of a 60hp Case steam engine threshing near Helena, Montana circa 1912.

Gary ;)

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Dad says when I was wee little guy (when your age is in months) and was fussy and couldn't sleep, he would take me for a ride on the Harley.

M diesel. truly a great story about your early rides on the Harley. Funny how noisy things can put a kid to sleep. Reminds me of harvest time when I'd be out with the old 510 MF and one of my nephews riding along. They'd lay on the big flat shelf behind the seat in the cab and it wasn't long before they were lulled to sleep by that droning straight piped 350 GM just a couple of feet to the right.

Its been said a picture is worth a thousand words so heres one from harvest 89.

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Actually, we don't have a microwave either. It's not that we didn't have one years ago when they first came out. My wife doesn't like the idea of the "rays", so I have to reheat coffee in a pan on the stove! I wonder if she is also afraid it may make her husband sterile? :rolleyes:

Gary ;)

Gary, I'm having a hard time keeping with replies to all your interesting subjects but just had to comment on this one. No microwave,,, omg. I'd starve without my microwave. :D

Plus I'd waste a lot more time in the kitchen than I care to when theres work to be done outside. Quite the opposite of a couple of uncles I had that heated their house and cooked meals with a wood stove all their lives.

Also had to smile at your "go kart" picture. A school friend and his brother built similar vehicles and we had a lot of fun pushing them down the smooth sidewalks of town. The amount of go in those karts was directly dependent on who was doing the pushing. There was'nt much metal in them as I recall , mostly scrap lumber construction. No pictures unfortunately, only in my memory.

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The last picture is of Lynn and his 1934 Ford Fordor Sedan on a bird hunting trip up Beaver Creek, above our farm, on his brother in-law's place. Notice the Judith Mountains in the far background at right. And even more sad to us is the 12 Gauge Montgomery-Ward pump shotgun, by his foot, which ended his life at age 78.

Gary ;)

Gary, I guess it would be kind of sad for you and family to look at that picture now knowing what you do. But we never really know whats going on in the other person's head.

Of course your photo reminded me of a similar one I have of my Uncle Sandy with what I believe is a shotgun and a 22 cal. in front of his Uncle Chas" 27 Chev around the early 1940s. Notice the huge pile of firewood in the background. I don't know how environmentally friendly wood heat is but it sure was a renewable resource around here. :D

The second photo shows Charles beside the same Chev when it was brand new.

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Ralph:

If it has both brake pedals on the right side, it is a late model. "Full Steam Ahead" shows that change was made in 1952. Does it have a hand or foot clutch?

Gary:

I'm sorry. What was your question? I promise I'll answer this time. I just talked to Carl and John Schrock had stopped by this afternoon. (In fact, I was just looking at the picture of the four of you on the Peerless when he called so I told him I was looking at 4 hooligans.)

Tom

Tubacase,

My question was back about John K. Castner, a few posts. He had been my grandpa's employer for a few months in 1879 at Beltane, Montana Territory.

You told Carl and John there was one good looking hooligan, didn't you?

Gary ;)

P.S. Did you notice the picture of my Case on page 60 of Full Steam Ahead?

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