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Old Binder Guy

IH Tractors on Montana Farm

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That buffalo hunter looks to have shot a pregnant one. Best I can tell,there is seven there? some with hides laying beside themselves. What did the hunter do with them? kill just for hides? or did they also sell the meat? seems like a lot of waste if they just let them lay. Thanks for the pics.

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The third picture is of my aunt Maggie and cousin Byron, at our Judith Basin farm in July of 1938 for Grandma Yaeger's funeral. Does anyone know what this car is in the picture? It closely resembles the 1936 Plymouth I rode home from the hospital in, but didn't all cars resemble each other in 1936?

Gary

Gary, that car in your picture looks awfully familiar. I have a few pics of my Uncles' 36 Dodge that I will have to get out and compare.

In the meantime here is another of my Uncle's earlier car, Grandpa's Model T. Likely taken in the mid 1940s, that is my Uncle second from left.

Ralph,

That's a nice picture of your grandpa's Model T Touring Car. It is likely a 1917-19, but could be feasibly as new as 1923. 1917-19 models didn't have a starter or generator, so they were equipped with the kerosene lamps on the windshield bracket.

I never thought of the 1937 Dodge Sedan dad took in I'd mentioned before. I think the grill is much like on the dodge. This one didn't appear to have the "Mayflour" ship hood ornament, but does appear to have something and that is likely the Dodge Ram, that was on the Dodge cars at that time.

You're right about that big Waterloo steam engine that dumped off of the ramps of that Railroad car. I'm wondering what they used for ramps, whether planking or a one piece ramp. Something must have gave way, as I don't think the engineer would miss the ramp that much? Anytime heavy iron goes over on its side like that, a human being is in grave danger. He may jump out of the way and he may jump "into the way?"

I remember at Lewistown one Saturday the Case dealership, Fredrickson Implement, had a used WD-9 in the shop. There was Spring Creek just outside their building and their back lot bordered the creek. The mechanic was backing up the "9" to park it on the end of the "bridge", when his foot slipped off of the clutch pedal and it went over backward. Other than a bent muffler and steering wheel, it didn't hurt the WD-9, but it pinned and drowned the mechanic. Anytime big pieces of iron are upset, and there is a human being on them, there is a great chance of tragedy. That "bridge" was nearly three blocks wide, as Spring Creek runs under the town.

This first picture is of my wife's grandpa's Oldsmobile and his family. Jefferson Davis Simpson owned this Oldsmobile V-8 powered Touring Car and I think the age of the car was about 1917, which wouldn't be too far from the date of the picture either. One daughter and one son aren't in the photo. Sharon's dad, my father in-law, Lynn, is the little guy standing on the running board in front of the driver's door.

The second picture is something that I can kind of claim in my family. While I've not mentioned it here before, my great grandfather eight times, Myles Standish, was also some relative of Philander Standish, who invented the Standish Steam Plow in the picture shown. I can't be sure if he was a direct descendant, as I am, but we have to somehow be related. I guess my point here is that steam engines have been in my family for several generations, as this one was photographed in 1868; even ahead of the first JI Case portable engine. I don't have my family tree in front of me, but my lineage goes through Myles and his second wife Barbara. One of their daughters married a Turner and I'd put a much later photo of Sarah Copher Turner on here some time back, remarking Sarah's family had someone of the Copher family who built cap & ball handguns for the Confederacy, during our Civil War. Sarah was my Great, Great Grandmother. So... I guess I'm a direct descendant to the first ever American Soldier of Fortune?

The third photo is of the NEW (circa 1913) Jawbone or Milwaukee Depot built at Lewistown, Montana. This new brick depot is now a good portion of the Yogo Inn and Motor Hotel there. I've mentioned this early in this thread.

This last picture is one of a 32hp Reeves cross compound steam engine fired up in the winter. This can be entertaining, as water used to make steam, subjected to cold, has been known to make ice. Ice has been known to break things too.

Gary

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That buffalo hunter looks to have shot a pregnant one. Best I can tell,there is seven there? some with hides laying beside themselves. What did the hunter do with them? kill just for hides? or did they also sell the meat? seems like a lot of waste if they just let them lay. Thanks for the pics.

Since we're talking the late 1870s to the early 1880s, they took the tongue and the hide. A "hunter" would take as many as 50-100 per day. US government policy became, "The control of the Indians will be dictated by the extinction of the buffalo." The Indians consumed what they killed. There were steamboats that went back to St. Louis setting mighty low in the water, hauling hides as their payload. Ironically the Indians traded some of their buffalo robes to the white man for guns, gunpowder and other supplies. In 1860, a German tannery discovered a way to make a fine grade of leather from the hides and white hunters flooded the plains. My grandpa relayed, through my dad, at times "the prairie was black with buffalo."

When our farm land was broken in 1907, with a Hart Parr 30-60 Old Reliable and an 8-bottom plow, my dad's job as an 8-year old boy was to ride the plow and when he saw a buffalo skull, he'd jump off, run ahead and grab the skull and drop it in the path of the Hart Parr's driver wheel, then back onto the plow.

Gary ;)

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The large amount of stone buildings you have shown amazes me. Those people built things to last.

Chub,

Here are a few more stone buildings in Lewistown. The first one is looking NE and the Judith Mountains are in the background. The second is the Lehman Brother's warehouse and the third is their store. The fourth is unknown to me, but on Main while the last is a postcard picture of the Montana Hardware Company on the corner of 3rd and Main, where my grandpa bought his first tractor, an Aultman-Taylor.

Gary ;)

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Ralph: The Case tractor is an SC; I recognize the air intake top. I would have guessed the combine to be later than a K, but I am not an expert on that vintage of Case combines. Gary knows I am a Case nut.

Tom Railsback

Tom I guess what confused me was that most of the model S Case tractors I have seen here are the wide front models and they all had much smaller rear wheels than the one in my photo. I think they were about a 26 inch rear wheel. This in the photo appears more like a 38. Here is another photo of the tractor showing the front end. That grille is certainly different from my DC4.

You're right about that big Waterloo steam engine that dumped off of the ramps of that Railroad car. I'm wondering what they used for ramps, whether planking or a one piece ramp. Something must have gave way, as I don't think the engineer would miss the ramp that much? Anytime heavy iron goes over on its side like that, a human being is in grave danger. He may jump out of the way and he may jump "into the way?".

Gary

Gary, I happened to come across this old photo that was forwarded to me by a friend a few years ago. I don't know whose it is, when or where it was taken. All it says is Nebraska, 1907 at the top. I guess the picture is self explanatory. Wonder how they got out of that predicament? And how they got the separator unhitched?

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This first picture of threshing in Kentucky was taken by a friend of mine. His intention was to make it appear to be a picture out of the 1930s and I'd have to say, he did pretty fair. That tractor at left was painted green and yellow. The steam engine is a Frick.

The second picture is another of my uncle Audie driving the Yaeger Brother's "bull rake" in a Lewistown parade on the 4th of July, 1938. It was built on the chassis of a Hupmobile automobile. A neighbor who saw it in action went home and told his family, they were down there "haying a hundred miles an hour."

The third picture shows Charles Clinton Colwell of Ross Fork(of the Judith River), Montana overhauling his 32hp Canadian Special Reeves cross compound steam engine in the wintertime. That "Big Sky" shop wouldn't be real appealing to me any longer.

The fourth picture is of a gas tractor, possibly an Aultman-Taylor(I can't tell), threshing near Fort Benton(the world's innermost port). It is interesting with the Model T, the large truck and the header & barge set up there.

The last picture is one I cropped of the Yaeger's pair of 15-30 McCormick-Deering tractors, with extension rims. My dad told me a story about a neighbor of theirs years ago who had a 15-30 with extension rims. He had removed the center row of cleats. His bad habit was at the end of the day, he'd get up and lean around the steering wheel, reach under the gas tank and turn off the gas valve about 50 feet from his stopping point for the day. This one day, Art Martin reached out, lost his balance and went off of the tractor headfirst. By the time he hit, the tractor was already running over him. It ran the full length of him, injuring him very badly, but his head, although cut up, was not smashed and he lived through it. He was pulling an old horse pulled cultivator and it was dragging him along, but it finally stopped due to the gas being turned off. According to dad, had that tractor had the center set of cleats, he'd have been killed immediately. I've struggled my whole life trying to understand why he wasn't anyway, while being very scarred up.

Gary ;)

Ralph: The Case tractor is an SC; I recognize the air intake top. I would have guessed the combine to be later than a K, but I am not an expert on that vintage of Case combines. Gary knows I am a Case nut.

Tom Railsback

Tom I guess what confused me was that most of the model S Case tractors I have seen here are the wide front models and they all had much smaller rear wheels than the one in my photo. I think they were about a 26 inch rear wheel. This in the photo appears more like a 38. Here is another photo of the tractor showing the front end. That grille is certainly different from my DC4.

You're right about that big Waterloo steam engine that dumped off of the ramps of that Railroad car. I'm wondering what they used for ramps, whether planking or a one piece ramp. Something must have gave way, as I don't think the engineer would miss the ramp that much? Anytime heavy iron goes over on its side like that, a human being is in grave danger. He may jump out of the way and he may jump "into the way?".

Gary

Gary, I happened to come across this old photo that was forwarded to me by a friend a few years ago. I don't know whose it is, when or where it was taken. All it says is Nebraska, 1907 at the top. I guess the picture is self explanatory. Wonder how they got out of that predicament? And how they got the separator unhitched?

Ralph, I'm not get into the Case tractor discussion any further as I'm a complete dummy when it comes to Case tractors. That is a nice picture you put on this trip Ralph. I've seen that Minneapolis return flue picture somewhere else. They didn't unhook the tongue of the threshing machine, I don't think. I think what happened was when the rear wheels of the steam engine fell through the bridge, it broke the wooden tongue on the thresher.

Gary ;)

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Ralph:

The SC does have 38 inch rears; my S has 26's. I think the combine is probably actually a K2. The original K's were galvanized and had round grain tanks or as you Canadiaons call them "hoppers".

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Ralph:

The SC does have 38 inch rears; my S has 26's. I think the combine is probably actually a K2. The original K's were galvanized and had round grain tanks or as you Canadiaons call them "hoppers".

Hoppers, yes thats what we call them although grain tank is also acceptable.

Somewhere I have a pic of myself standing beside a Case S at an auction sale years ago and I will try to post it here. In the meantime, here is a later picture of what I believe is the same Case pull type combine but this time pulled by a John Deere D.

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Ralph that is a great picture of the John Deere pulling the Case combine. I enjoy learning things from you and others too.

My mother's three brothers are shown with four of "the kids" sitting on the Strain Jersey Dairy milk delivery truck, before I was born. I don't know what kind of vehicle it is, but it'd be unique to have today. The two in the "caps" had the dairy, north of Lewistown, leased for several years.

The second picture is of the Fergus Ranch's 40hp Gaar Scott engine threshing on Armells Creek. My cousins now own this farm the county was named for.

The third picture is a postcard picture of an IH Mogul pulling wagons.

The last is a Gaar Scott company catalog picture showing a Big Forty Gaar Scott pulling disk plows.

Gary ;)

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Ralph:

The SC does have 38 inch rears; my S has 26's. I think the combine is probably actually a K2. The original K's were galvanized and had round grain tanks or as you Canadiaons call them "hoppers".

Tubacase,

I'm Canadian, eh? That's what we called grain tanks on our combines in the Judith Basin... "Hoppers!" Ho aboot that, eh?

Gary ;)

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Tubacase,

I'm Canadian, eh? That's what we called grain tanks on our combines in the Judith Basin... "Hoppers!" Ho aboot that, eh?

Gary ;)

Well Gary, I guess you are close enough to the border to be influenced a bit by the canucks. I do see a lot of similarities in your style of farming there, more so than those in the southern and eastern U.S. where its a whole different style of cropping.

You've had a good bunch of pictures on here today. I was hoping to post the one of myself and that S Case tractor but , as usual, I can't find it when I want it . I know I just saw that picture a few days ago.

Anyway, I did come across this shot of some nice IH trucks in the Smithson museum in Rimbey, Alberta from a few years ago. They have a collection including pretty well every pickup IH built.

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Wow, this thread is amazing! You guys are a wealth of info. Very nice pics- this is better than going to a museum, such history. Keep 'em comin'! :D

IH RD :)

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Thanks IH RD!

Ralph,

What a fine photo inside that museum with the IH pickups. That second blue one looks just like the one I had... Same model and grille and paint.

When I worked at Woods Brother's Implement in Hobson in the winter of 1967, one of the local ranchers had been users of Chevrolet pickups forever. They used IH tractors and haying equipment though. The boss had one of the brothers in the office one day and was trying to convince him he needed to trade off that Chevy pickup setting outside for one of the new 3/4 ton IH pickups on display. The rancher said, "I wouldn't be seen in one." The boss said, "Well...they're kind of like an old (I'll use this>) prostitute... You hate to be seen with them in town, but they sure do you a good job on the ranch!" He didn't sell him an IH pickup.

Gary ;)

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OBG; I can still hear Woods' voice, when he would come out with one of his descriptive sayings. He was one who is not easily forgotten. RAY

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OBG; I can still hear Woods' voice, when he would come out with one of his descriptive sayings. He was one who is not easily forgotten. RAY

Ray,

Big old Howard could really boom out something like that saying and laugh about it, couldn't he! I remember another saying he had... "I screw 'em so bad the first time, they always return again, to try to get even with me!" I am and was friends with this family that drove Chevy pickups. It took several years of Howard's talking to get them to run red equipment on their huge ranch. During WWII, the rancher's dad went to Howard's dad to buy a hayrack. Tires were a tightly regulated commodity and the good ones weren't obtainable, as the military got the "rubber" tires and we got the synthetic rubber. Anyway, the rancher made his deal with Woods and hooked onto the hayrack to pull it home. When he got home, he noticed a big hole in the face of a tire, which had a big "boot" (A tire repair to make it hopefully keep the inner tube from forcing its way out of the hole in the tire; for the kids present.) Upon further examination, the rancher found all four tires had boots in them! Howard's dad had jacked up the hayrack and rolled each tire so the ruptured hole was down against the grass.

Chub,

I found another picture kicking around of our Rumely combine and a 15-30 McCormick-Deering tractor, taken at "the camp" years ago. The cook car is also setting there. I've posted it before, but since Chub noticed my affinity with Rumely combines, I had to post it again.

Gary ;)

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I bumped into a couple of celebrities here. The first is another picture of JI Case engine #1, shown here in Michigan in 1955, but under its own live steam.

The second picture is one of a scarce, if not one of a kind, Fifteen Caterpillar "Citrus" owned by Tom Madden, who sent me this scan. That is Clark Gable in the operator's seat when he owned it.

Gary ;)

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Thanks IH RD!

Ralph,

What a fine photo inside that museum with the IH pickups. That second blue one looks just like the one I had... Same model and grille and paint.

When I worked at Woods Brother's Implement in Hobson in the winter of 1967, one of the local ranchers had been users of Chevrolet pickups forever. They used IH tractors and haying equipment though. The boss had one of the brothers in the office one day and was trying to convince him he needed to trade off that Chevy pickup setting outside for one of the new 3/4 ton IH pickups on display. The rancher said, "I wouldn't be seen in one." The boss said, "Well...they're kind of like an old (I'll use this>) prostitute... You hate to be seen with them in town, but they sure do you a good job on the ranch!" He didn't sell him an IH pickup.

Gary ;)

Gary, that is a pretty special museum alright. While I have not been to it personally, my SIL and nephews made sure to take lots of pictures for me when they were there a few years ago.

Funny how IH pickups always had that reputation of being not quite as "car-like" or smooth as the other big three pickups. I wouldn't want to guess as to how their sales compared to the other makes. Seems to me there were pretty near equal numbers of all makes represented around this area. We had a Ford dealer and an IH dealer right in this little village. And the Case dealer also sold Chrysler vehicles so nobody had to go far shopping for a new vehicle in those days.

Finally found that pic I was mentioning of the little Case S tractor. It shows how small the rear wheels were. I'd estimate about a 24 , maybe 26 inch diameter wheel. This one was at a local farm auction back in 83. Thats my "palouse type" hills in the background of the picture. :D

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The first picture shows a 110hp Case threshing with a threshing machine that has double "Garden City" feeders. This gave a huge threshing machine the ability to feed more grain than could normally be pitched into a normal single feeder, such as a Ruth feeder, which my dad always preferred.

This second picture shows an Advance strawburner steam engine pulling an early wooden threshing machine with Garden City feeders, folded for transport.

The third picture is an Avery advertizement promoting their Avery "Low Down" feeder. They were intended to be used when doing stack threshing.

The last picture is of the Andersons threshing in North Dakota in the 1940s, stack style. My late friend Danny Roen was the engineer of the big 35hp Buffalo Pitts for many years. This was no steam show, it was still threshing seriously as a means of harvesting.

Gary ;)

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Ralph,

You were writing while I was during my last post. That is a cute little Case tractor you placed there. Tubacase will slobber on his keyboard when he sees it, right Tom? Doesn't that make you mad when you have a picture and can't locate it??? It sure does me. I've been looking for one here all day and I know I have it somewhere at home.

The first picture is another of the Anderson's stack pictures. I've helped make these stacks once, myself. It is kind of an art to have the heads faced inward and build the pile, so if they get rained on, the grain doesn't necessarly get wet, at least not right away.

My friend, the late Danny Roen, is shown here with the Anderson's 35hp Buffalo Pitts straw burner. Danny's daughter Rachel is standing on the back of the engine in this 1958 picture.

The third picture is one of a side mounted Gaar Scott steam engine threshing in Kansas. I like that speedster parked there in front of the threshing machine. The driver of that speedster likely felt like he was in "high tech" country? This was a pretty mechanized way of farming compared to the way it was done 25 years prior to this. Somewhere in my "stuff" I have a 1907 Scientific American "Automobile Special" issue. I don't remember what brand of an old touring car it was in the advertizement, but it had brass carbide headlights, brass side lights on the firewall, no windshield, no top, leather tufted seats and the steering wheel on the right hand side of the car. Their ad stated something like this: "Our automobiles are so far advanced it is inconceivable as to how it could be further improved!"

The last picture is one from my postcard collection, showing cars at a gas station in Cedar Falls, Iowa. I thought it was kind of neat.

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Thanks IH RD!

Ralph,

What a fine photo inside that museum with the IH pickups. That second blue one looks just like the one I had... Same model and grille and paint.

When I worked at Woods Brother's Implement in Hobson in the winter of 1967, one of the local ranchers had been users of Chevrolet pickups forever. They used IH tractors and haying equipment though. The boss had one of the brothers in the office one day and was trying to convince him he needed to trade off that Chevy pickup setting outside for one of the new 3/4 ton IH pickups on display. The rancher said, "I wouldn't be seen in one." The boss said, "Well...they're kind of like an old (I'll use this>) prostitute... You hate to be seen with them in town, but they sure do you a good job on the ranch!" He didn't sell him an IH pickup.

Gary ;)

Gary, that is a pretty special museum alright. While I have not been to it personally, my SIL and nephews made sure to take lots of pictures for me when they were there a few years ago.

Funny how IH pickups always had that reputation of being not quite as "car-like" or smooth as the other big three pickups. I wouldn't want to guess as to how their sales compared to the other makes. Seems to me there were pretty near equal numbers of all makes represented around this area. We had a Ford dealer and an IH dealer right in this little village. And the Case dealer also sold Chrysler vehicles so nobody had to go far shopping for a new vehicle in those days.

Finally found that pic I was mentioning of the little Case S tractor. It shows how small the rear wheels were. I'd estimate about a 24 , maybe 26 inch diameter wheel. This one was at a local farm auction back in 83. Thats my "palouse type" hills in the background of the picture. :D

Ralph,

It seems IH never quite kept up with the "Big Three", but they tried. I am re-posting a picture of my son Mike beside my 1967 1100 4X4. I bought it from Howard Woods at Hobson. I was thinking it had a little gold crest below the window, denoting Custom Cab but I don't see it here? It had cloth seats, chrome front bumper, gold carpeting, padded dash, radio, whitewall tires and full disk wheel covers, chrome west coast mirrors, power steering, power brakes, Warn hubs, limited slip rear end, 345 V-8, four speed synchromesh transmission and seat belts. It was more "car-like" than most other IH pickups of the era.

I was thinking of when I was back working at Bourke Motor in 1974-75. John was trying to sell an IH pickup to a local rancher who didn't drive IH. I remember him stating, the IH weighed more than either a Ford or Chevy of that year and "...it wasn't all in the seatcovers!" This rancher was not fully impressed with our new "disposable, plastic world" yet. We'd had an extremely cold period and he had his (likely Chevy) pickup parked in a small shed, with no door. It wouldn't start, so he got out his oil fired space heater, aimed it toward the radiator, plugged it in and walked away, while it warmed up. When he returned, the grille had dripped down onto the bumper and ground below. This was why he was even looking at an IH which still had a metal grille. I can still remember when I had little magnetic gadgets that would stick all over a pickup dash. I don't think there's one spot on my Chevy pickup where a magnetic flashlight would stick to the dash?

Gary ;)

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The first picture shows a 110hp Case threshing with a threshing machine that has double "Garden City" feeders. This gave a huge threshing machine the ability to feed more grain than could normally be pitched into a normal single feeder, such as a Ruth feeder, which my dad always preferred.

This second picture shows an Advance strawburner steam engine pulling an early wooden threshing machine with Garden City feeders, folded for transport.

The third picture is an Avery advertizement promoting their Avery "Low Down" feeder. They were intended to be used when doing stack threshing.

The last picture is of the Andersons threshing in North Dakota in the 1940s, stack style. My late friend Danny Roen was the engineer of the big 35hp Buffalo Pitts for many years. This was no steam show, it was still threshing seriously as a means of harvesting.

Gary ;)

A few comments and perhaps questions on pages past............

The Case SC I thought was maybe such but did not tumble as to the air cleaner and to the sharp that is the obvious thing as the DC has a flat top metal dome on it. Had DC's when young and never a SC. The "goofiest" thing about them is that the hand clutch lever was left side on the DC and right side on the SC.Noted as being hard on fences on right hand turns with that steering arm out on the left side.. Posts, woven wire especially!! That S in the farm sale picture looks to have excellent sheet metal. The S's and D's had both fixed and adjustable front axles and had different designations for each that I do not recall sitting here. I do remember the correct designation for a DC row-crop tricycle to be DC-3 Have a nicely restored SC and DC. There were also orchard models with skirts. Lot's still to be found in Michigan. One orchard man I know in Michigan has several DC's and uses them regularly.

The Rumley combine we used was on rubber and was pulled to the farm from town with a pickup truck with header on a trailor. I seem to remember a ship's wheel arrangement on operators platform the adjust the height of same but am not sure I see same. Your last picture show the counter weight arms behind the header with the weights that made the up and down childs play as far as effort. If I remember right the putting of the weights up on the balance arm took a "bit" of effort.

CLARK GABLES' CATERPILLAR!!! Wouldn't they love that one at a sale now a days. Be a neat out fit for shows could almost haul same on a car trailor.

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Ralph:

Gary is right; I did almost have an orgasm when I saw that little S Case.

I'd bet it had 26 inch rears as that was standard equipment according to my S parts book. It looked like it was in pretty good shape other than having the muffler broken off which probabaly let water in and siezed up the engine.

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Are you guys familiar with "straw sheds"? We would go to the woods and cut saplings with crotches, set them in the ground, put other straight ones in the crotches in a big rectangle, old woven wire over same and thresh over it leaving one side open, usually to the southeast and what a warm nice place for cattle in the bad days of winter

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A few comments and perhaps questions on pages past............

The Rumley combine we used was on rubber and was pulled to the farm from town with a pickup truck with header on a trailor. I seem to remember a ship's wheel arrangement on operators platform the adjust the height of same but am not sure I see same. Your last picture show the counter weight arms behind the header with the weights that made the up and down childs play as far as effort. If I remember right the putting of the weights up on the balance arm took a "bit" of effort.

CLARK GABLES' CATERPILLAR!!! Wouldn't they love that one at a sale now a days. Be a neat out fit for shows could almost haul same on a car trailor.

Chub,

I remember Dad and his brothers putting rubber on our two Rumelys in about 1945. I wish I still had the double cone gadget that held the hubs and spokes, plus the rim for welding. I was always fascinated by the huge springs of the header balance on those Rumelys. Ours had the "ship's wheels" too. I went back to post 800, thinking they would show up there, but I guess none of my pictures show it very well. They were only like 3/8" rod, with wooden handles outside the circular rim.

I'd hate to venture a guess as to what that Cat 15 would bring at a sale?

Gary ;)

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Palouse sent me a scan from Harris Combine literature, which I thought was kind of neat, to an old flatlander, like me. These combines were built in Walla Walla, Washington and later Fresno, California. I understand they only built hillside combines.

The second is a postcard picture of a 32hp Case steam engine pulling a 12 bottom John Deere plow near Lake Andes, South Dakota.

The last post for me for a few hours, is this one of the Stanley Brother's steam race car, of 50 horsepower. This car broke the world land speed record in 1907. I don't have the small figures but they beat 127.?? miles per hour. In a later accident, on the same beach, the car came apart and was destroyed. Since they ran over 500 psi steam pressure, the boiler rolling across the sand was purported to look like a "meteor" in its travels.

Are you guys familiar with "straw sheds"? We would go to the woods and cut saplings with crotches, set them in the ground, put other straight ones in the crotches in a big rectangle, old woven wire over same and thresh over it leaving one side open, usually to the southeast and what a warm nice place for cattle in the bad days of winter

Chub,

I've never heard of them, but what a practical use of straw from a thresher! I would think livestock would want to lick your hand for building them for them? Kind of like when you have "cake" in your hand? As I remember the livestock hollowed out some of the straw stack for that purpose as was, but not something they could get into to protect them from the wind like a straw shed.

Gary ;)

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