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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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I just got this picture of Mike with the Afghan National Army's "fleet" of Soviet T-62 tanks at Camp Blackhorse. I didn't get a chance to find out how he is coming with them. I know they aren't the M-1As he's used to. He cut me off soon this morning, as they were having small crabs, steaks and near beer for Friday supper. Friday is a laxed day as the Afghans pretty much have that day off. Mike said they'd pulled maintenace on their vehicles and got personal time to work on their own projects for a change.

I'm running behind and must get ready for work. I need my job... so I can get a paycheck, so I can buy gas to get to work...

Gary ;)

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Well it is Friday!!!!!

My first picture is of a unique old automobile which I don't know what it is, but undoubtedly one or two cylinders cross mounted under the seat. The vehicle in front of it appears to be an antique bus. This was on Main Street in Kalispell, Montana where I live.

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The next picture is of the Kalispell Mercantile circa 1920. There are some neat old cars and trucks there.

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The last picture is of my friend "Cowboy Bob" and his wife Sue with a neat old original Montana "mud wagon" stage coach. Bob spruced it up and put new leather on the front and rear of it. He is a well known western "garb" maker and knife maker. Sue is equally as talented with the old clothes she makes for this time period. I don't think she made Bob's buffalo (bison) hide robe though.

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Have a great weekend!

Gary ;)

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The next picture is of the Kalispell Mercantile circa 1920. There are some neat old cars and trucks there.

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Have a great weekend!

Gary ;)

Hi Gary, and all. I have had a busy few days , ysterday hauling wheat to the cleaning plant for spring seeding (in a month with a little luck). The two speed quit on the Loadstar but luckily I only had small loads left to haul so it handled it in high axle with no problem. Now I have it apart and waiting on a new shift motor for the electric axle shift.

Your military pics were interesting and it sure is great that you can have such instant communication with your son so far away.

You pic of theKalispell Mercantile reminded me of this one I have saved in my own archives from the Sask archives site. It shows a line of Marmon trucks outside the dealership. Its a name I have heard of but don't think it ever reached the numbers of the other "big three". Seems to me there was a Marmon Herrington 4 wheel drive conversion offered back in the thirties. Just my memories here without any research (which might be risky). :P

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Ralph,

That's a neat picture you put on with the Marmon trucks. I think Marmon was a pretty decent vehicle, but just didn't survive the Great Depression. I remember a Marmon hearse that a member of the old car club of Montana brought to tours. He carried an old wooden casket in the back end of it and it had a bloody rubber hand hanging out between the lid and the lower portion of the casket. As I remember that was a very nice looking old car, and quite fancy. Like maybe on the level of a Packard or Lincoln?

I had to repair a two speed and replace the motor on an A-160 I used to have. Replacing the motor isn't bad, but the rest of what I did was a little more involved. That has only been 40+ years ago that I did it.

Ralph, you're right about the communication today with our military abroad. We finally bumped into our neighbors last night and asked if they'd noticed our Christmas tree lit up. They politely mentioned they had noticed. We explained we were leaving it up for the year Mike is gone. He may not be home for Christmas next year, but it'll be there when he comes. Crazy? Stupid? Idiotic? We don't think so. It isn't a shrine. It is just a daily reminder for us to pray for him and remind us of the many, many pleasant memories he's brought us in the past 42 years.

Gary ;)

well, I went back and edited and placed the picture of that A-160 in. It was a 1958 model and a pretty decent truck too.

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Thanks for the replies on the old IHC pickup everybody. Looks like Ralph has got it pegged.

Hope you don't mind Ralph--------but for future reference, I swiped a copy of your truck's picture to my files. How long have you had it-----that's a beauty!!!!

Also----thanks for the info on the Mercury trucks.

Good luck on your 2 speed motor problems. I have replaced 2 or 3 motors in my time---------but have also resolved numerous 2 speed axle problems within the electrical circuits (dirty contacts within the switch button----and blown fuses, etc.)-------make sure you are getting fire to the motor before reaching for the new electric motor. I did have to replace the one on my F-700 a couple of years ago-----and I am thinking it was somewhere around the $300 mark. The 2 speed axle sure makes alot more truck out of most any truck-----if used correctly, it will sure save lugging your engine. The F-700 has a 5 speed with the 2 speed rear axle---------(po-boys 10 speed). :huh::lol:

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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Thanks for the replies on the old IHC pickup everybody. Looks like Ralph has got it pegged.

Hope you don't mind Ralph--------but for future reference, I swiped a copy of your truck's picture to my files. How long have you had it-----that's a beauty!!!!

Good luck on your 2 speed motor problems. I have replaced 2 or 3 motors in my time---------but have also resolved numerous 2 speed axle problems within the electrical circuits (dirty contacts within the switch button----and blown fuses, etc.)-------make sure you are getting fire to the motor before reaching for the new electric motor.)

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

Delta, you are welcome to the pic of the IH truck. I can only wish it was my truck. That IH C series truck pic was taken at a show in B.C. Canada a couple of years ago by a friend of mine who knows my weakness for old vehicles and machinery in general so I have quite a collection of photos over the years.

On the 2 speed axle. I am pretty sure its the motor as it has been giving intermittent problems for years now and just finally quit shifting the other day. Better now than during harvest time. :mellow:

Ralph, you're right about the communication today with our military abroad. We finally bumped into our neighbors last night and asked if they'd noticed our Christmas tree lit up. They politely mentioned they had noticed. We explained we were leaving it up for the year Mike is gone. He may not be home for Christmas next year, but it'll be there when he comes. Crazy? Stupid? Idiotic? We don't think so. It isn't a shrine. It is just a daily reminder for us to pray for him and remind us of the many, many pleasant memories he's brought us in the past 42 years.

Gary ;)

Gary, not crazy at all. Lets hope the year goes by quickly. My Dad was in the real action for just over a year from June of 44 to the end of WWII in 1945. I can only imagine the sense of relief they must have felt knowing it was all over and they'd be back home soon. In this pic Dad and some of the rest of the 18th battery were camped out near Oldenburg, Germany shortly after VE day. They are holding a nice souvenier swastika flag standing in front of one of their Valentine/Archer tanks. Dad is the far left end in middle row.

A lot of things have changed in the 60+ years between this photo and the ones you posted recently.

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While the subject is "old pick up trucks"-----

Can someone identify the make and year of this pickup-----this is apparently a snap shot of my dad riding along one of the field roads. Sorry the picture is not clearer-----started out as a small snap shot and I have enlarged it. Sometimes I think its an early model IHC-----sometimes General Motors; I am somewhat in the dark since I wasn't manufactured until 1943. :blink:

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Another question concerning the Mercury trucks. Were the Mercury trucks only marketed in Canada??? I don't ever remember seeing any here in the states.

Don't know exactly when Ford added in the 50 models------but do remember the earlier ('48----maybe '52) models primarily being F-1, F-2, F3---------F7, F8 models. F-1 = 1/2 ton; F-2 = 3/4 ton; F-3 = 1 ton-----I am thinking that along about '53 they added the F-350 as Gary has pictured, but maybe still had the F-300. Its funny-----but Ford has an apparently factory sponsored "Truck Forum", but it all seems to be geared toward current production models. Real hard to get any information on the older trucks-----or anything above the current F-350 dualies.

Last but not least--------a special thanks to Mike and all of the troops protecting us during these precarious times. Please pass a big ol Mississippi thanks on to Mike------and ask Mike to pass it on to his troops. We've had a U.S. flag flying out front since before noon on 9/11/01. Once a Marine-----always a Marine!!!!-----but salute all of our troops in all branches of service. Thanks for your service.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

Delta Dirt,

I went through several of my files (several thougsand scans) and finally found the picture I wanted to find when you sent this. I didn't have the time to look when you posted this, but I took it today. This front pickup is another C MODEL (right Ralph?) I took in a parade at Fort Benton(the world's innermost port), Montana several years ago at their 150th Anniversary Celebration parade.

Ralph,

I really appreciate your posting the picture of your father and his fellow soldiers with their Valentine-Archer tanks and the swastika flag. That photo says volumes to me. And thanks for thinking I'm not crazy. You may, however, be extradited and sobpoenaed for my sanity trial for making that statement? :rolleyes::unsure::wacko:

Gary ;)

I just remembered this other picture I took at that same parade in Fort Benton(the world's innermost port) at that 150th anniversary parade. It shows a neat little 1904 Cadillac ahead of a Six Speed Special International truck.

In post 3177, I posted pictures taken in Kalispell, Montana. The first photo shows a little car that I hesitated to identify. I wanted to say "Franklin" due to the shape of the hood, but wasn't sure about the unusual seats. My friend Roger sent this information he had on that Model A Franklin of circa 1903-04.

In the second picture of that post, he idendified the truck in the center of the photo as an IHC. It's helpful to have friends who know old cars and trucks as well as Roger does.

Gary ;)

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When Mike and I attended the steam show at Osage, Iowa last August, a friend of ours from Pennslyvania, Kevin Small came also. Kevin is at left by me and Mike in front of the 40hp Reeves we all went to see and operate.

During a later conversation with me Kevin remarked, "I hope what I do for a living will help make Mike safe in afghanistan." Kevin works for a company near Pittsburg that make the 1" bullet proof glass for the new "up-armored" Humvees.

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This is a picture of Mike and a US Marine sargeant on his his team. They also have a US Navy Corpsman on the team. I don't know what Mike is laughing about, but apparently they do have some fun sometimes. "Mike's new Humvee" was so new the front seats were still wrapped in clear plastic. Notice how Kevin Small's windows mount on these armor plated trucks. And that old "Maw Deuce" M-2 .50 caliber machine gun is still an awesome tool to have along on convoys. They will still "reach out and touch someone." I notice a provision for extra protection for the radiator, or I'd assume that is what that extension up front is about.

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Gary ;)

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HI Gary

That does look like another C series IH truck in your picture of the parade. Your picture of the six speed special IH truck in the parade reminds me of a local one we have here. My brother used to drive it in parades and it was quite the novelty truck. I see it had the cowl mounted headlights unlike the one in your picture. I will post a picture of it that I took in 05. I was recently talking to the owner and it sounds like he is looking to sell it.

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Ralph,

I know Dad had three IH Six Speed Specials and two had the headlights up front as in my photo and another had them on the side. I'm posting a picture of still another one he and his brothers owned and it also had the cowl mounted headlights. I'm going to have to wait until Roger reads this and reports back to me, what the difference was. He REALLY KNOWS old trucks. He sent me two old truck books this past week and I've been poring over them. He also sent a small book on the Sears automobiles. I've been dancing in Hog Heaven!

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This second picture is one of an IHC truck (Pickup??) at that same Fort Benton(the world's innermost port) parade the others were in I posted this morning.

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That is a nice looking old Six Speed Special your brother is driving in that parade. It'd look pretty good in my shop!

Gary ;)

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Ralph,

My Six Speed Special parts book doesn't show cabs. So I still don't know about the cowl mounted headlights. These are the only two pictures of their trucks in the whole book and it doesn't mention anything about cabs. Maybe at this time, their cabs were built elsewhere? Model Ts were only sold as chassis units until about 1923. Gary ;)

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"Professor"---

What years were the Six Speed Specials manufactured???? Presuming early----mid 20's????

Also----in viewing your parts book photo; it appears that the truck had two transmission sticks in the illustration-----was it maybe a 3 speed with a high/low???

Apparently-----they were pretty popular old trucks for the time.

In seeing the truck photo with the tank loaded on its back-----reminded me of an old "semi trailer" that my dad had left over from those days (was rusting scrap when I wuz a kid). It set on the shop yard for years (think it even had the solid rubber tires)--------and all of 20 ft. long at its maximum. Reckon it got hauled to the scap yard before my time------and man, do I still kick myself for all the items that I have hauled off myself.

Anybody got any calibration device that will tell a man when its "junk" and when its a "collectible"??????---------seems like the older I get, the less "junk" I see. (must be my eyesight???) :o:huh:

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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Gary, and Delta, I too was curious about the variations in headlight mounting on these IH trucks so I had to consult my International Color History to find out. The S series trucks were built from 1921 to 1929. The Six Speed Special was introduced in 1927. It had a three speed transmission combined with a two speed axle , to give six speeds. They state that the lighter duty "S" series trucks had the headlights mounted up front between the fenders and radiator. The bigger heavier duty trucks had the headlights back on the cowl so its a way to differentiate between the light and heavy duty trucks. But then on another page they state that the early model S trucks had the cowl mounted lights while later models had the up front mounted lights.

As far as the two levers, it shows an emergency hand brake mounted just to the right of the shift lever. These trucks only had rear brakes .

Anyway, now I am beginning to question my memory on the picture of the IH truck I posted. Not sure if it was a true six speed special or just an "S33".

Heres a picture I may have posted before of a "newer" D series IH truck that I took at a farm auction sale back in 1985. Can't recall what it sold for but back then it was just scrap iron. Of course nowadays it would have followed me home. :rolleyes:

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I just got this picture of Mike with the Afghan National Army's "fleet" of Soviet T-62 tanks at Camp Blackhorse. I didn't get a chance to find out how he is coming with them. I know they aren't the M-1As he's used to. He cut me off soon this morning, as they were having small crabs, steaks and near beer for Friday supper. Friday is a laxed day as the Afghans pretty much have that day off. Mike said they'd pulled maintenace on their vehicles and got personal time to work on their own projects for a change.

I'm running behind and must get ready for work. I need my job... so I can get a paycheck, so I can buy gas to get to work...

Gary ;)

Will be interesting to hear what he says about Russian engineering, looked at the huge Antanov cargo plan in the 90's and the skin was just overlapped and riveted :unsure: didn't look the best but one can't argue with it's capabilities........Cousin worked with an engineer and asked about how it was back there, he said once they decided to make a watch for the people they made 20 million, didn't matter if any kept time thats the watch they were making.........looks like the tanks are still goin :ph34r:

I recall the truck and tank moving from Smokstak? Got to give us some more details, before DOT days :D:D

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Delta Dirt,

While that "semi trailer" wasn't exactly that, it became that hauling this fuel tank from the "city" of Glengarry(pop. 4) to our farm. These coule appear to be hard rubber tires on the rear of this "semi" trailer. Lance, this was "pre-DOT" trucking.

Ralph,

I sure appreciate your taking time to look up things to straighten us out, regarding the S series and the Speed series. I never realized they overlapped chronologically. I've pretty much just been calling all of them "Six Speed Specials" when they really weren't. Our Six Speed Specials had four cylinder engines, but that late S model Dad had with the headlights on the cowl had a six cylinder engine.

That truck you posted appears to be a D-30. Uncle Bill had one in green cab and black fenders. I wasn't old enough to drive it, but I rode in it a lot of miles during harvest.

Lance,

I know they rode in Russian helicopters from some outside "...istan" to Kabul. I'm anxious to hear the report on the T-62s myself. I know they weren't designed with "creature comfort" in mind; all business.

Gary ;)

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Well that IH Truck hauling a tank really wasn't a "semi", yet was kind of a semi.

My good friend Roger sent me two more photos today, so at least this thread will go another day. He sent one of a Model TT C-cab truck. It appears to have hard rubber tires on the front wheels, 30"X5" pneumatics on the rear of the truck and hard rubber on the rear of the "tractor trailer". That is a pretty fair sized jag of lumber on it. It appears to have Rocky Mountain brakes mounted, which would make it a little safer to head down a slight grade.

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The other photo is of "a 12-25 Case tractor on 'a truck'." It appears to belong to a Case dealership. I think that is a very classy old truck, but Roger didn't say what brand it was. I'd imagine after the books he sent me, he'd expect me to do my own research? I had a friend here in Kalispell when I moved here who had a 12-25 Case. I thought it was a nice style of tractor. At that period in time, none of the different horsepower size Case tractors they built had the same styling. Every one was different from the others. Gary ;)

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I've got a few new old pictures on a disk so thought this one might be of interest. It is labelled breaking sod near Weyburn, Sask. Not sure what make the steamers are, maybe Gary will know? Sure is a rough looking field but is it ever flat land. Good material there to build a sod house. :P

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I've got a few new old pictures on a disk so thought this one might be of interest. It is labelled breaking sod near Weyburn, Sask. Not sure what make the steamers are, maybe Gary will know? Sure is a rough looking field but is it ever flat land. Good material there to build a sod house. :P

Ralph,

I guess this is good timing? The rear engine is a 32hp Reeves cross compound and the front engine is either a 32hp or a 110hp Case. The only real visible difference at that time between those two was the length of the smokebox and that part of the engine isn't in the photo.

Thanks so much for posting this picture. That is a great photo. And you are sure right about the sod being the type that would make a good roof on a cabin.

Gary

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The first picture is of a 30-60 Aultman-Taylor gas tractor near Havre, Montana hauling grain to market.

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This second picture is of an Aultman-Taylor steam engine pulling an Aultman-Taylor wooden separator with a Garden City (double) feeder.

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The third picture shows a Garden City feeder in operation. This one is being turned with a Gaar Scott steam engine. Garden City feeders were a good choice for stack feeding as in this photo. Gary ;)

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That's sure a great photo Ralph!! Thanks for sharing it.....WOW!! I just wish I could have been there.... :P:blush:

Darryn B)

Darryn, it must have been an exciting time to live. All that open prairie that had never seen a plow before. All that potential for growth.

This photo must have been taken a few years later as it looks to be a gas powered tractor. Minneapolis from what I can tell. Looks like they are plowing stubble, not breaking sod. 4 or 5 furrows so it must have been a good sized tractor. Nice cab too. :D

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Hello Ralph,

That's a neat picture you posted of a Rumely GasPull tractor. I think by the time Advance Rumely developed this tractor, they were feeling hard times and they only emerged from the Great Depression in the form of Allis Chalmers.

Here is a photo of a restored GasPull from a friend.

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I couldn't think of the name GasPull at first and thought it might be a Rumely Doall, but they are more of a "Farmall Regular" style of cultivating tractor. I'll post a catalog cover picture of them. Gary ;)

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Hello Ralph,

That's a neat picture you posted of a Rumely GasPull tractor. I think by the time Advance Rumely developed this tractor, they were feeling hard times and they only emerged from the Great Depression in the form of Allis Chalmers.

Here is a photo of a restored GasPull from a friend.

I couldn't think of the name GasPull at first and thought it might be a Rumely Doall, but they are more of a "Farmall Regular" style of cultivating tractor. I'll post a catalog cover picture of them. Gary ;)

Gary, thanks for straightening me out on that Rumely. In fact the picture was labelled as a Rumely but I didn't recognize it as anything like the ones I knew. I looked through my reference book and found a picture of this 1911 Minneapolis Universal 20-40 that I thought looked the same, right down to the cab and muffler. But the picture you posted of the Rumely gas pull also looks like the one in my picture. I guess I tend to think "Oil pull" whenever I hear the name Rumely. I think they were a lot more common.

Anyway, here is a pic of the Minneapolis 20-40 from my reference book.

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Hello Ralph,

That's a neat picture you posted of a Rumely GasPull tractor. I think by the time Advance Rumely developed this tractor, they were feeling hard times and they only emerged from the Great Depression in the form of Allis Chalmers.

Here is a photo of a restored GasPull from a friend.

I couldn't think of the name GasPull at first and thought it might be a Rumely Doall, but they are more of a "Farmall Regular" style of cultivating tractor. I'll post a catalog cover picture of them. Gary ;)

Gary, thanks for straightening me out on that Rumely. In fact the picture was labelled as a Rumely but I didn't recognize it as anything like the ones I knew. I looked through my reference book and found a picture of this 1911 Minneapolis Universal 20-40 that I thought looked the same, right down to the cab and muffler. But the picture you posted of the Rumely gas pull also looks like the one in my picture. I guess I tend to think "Oil pull" whenever I hear the name Rumely. I think they were a lot more common.

Anyway, here is a pic of the Minneapolis 20-40 from my reference book.

Ralph,

I can sure see the mixup. Please don't take it personally as I see what you posted here. First of all.. Please understand. I kind of KNOW steam. When it comes to gas tractors, I'm MEDIOCRE at best. Like you, I sure recognize "Oilpulls" a lot easier than many of the perriferal lines.

I have to cut this short. I just spent 45 minutes instant messaging with Mike, so my day is off to a good start, but I'm on the wrong foot!

Gary ;)

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Ralph,

This is what my friend Roger had to say about the tractor dilemma we had above. Everybody is correct!!! :rolleyes: That Roger is a real handy guy! Thanks Roger.

"The tractors shown, Minneapolis and Gas Pull, are the same tractor! The were built right here in Minnesota by the Northwest Company in Stillwater Minnesota. I think you are familiar with their steam engines. They also built that tractor and marketed it as the "Universal" under their own name. They also built them for Minneapolis, Rumely and one other company that I can't remember now. This was in the early period before ether one of big companies built a smaller tractor. I have a friend that has one that I have done a little work on. It has a two cylinder opposed engine and is a rather crude design and layout."

Now Roger is playing with my head. He just designed this washer for the industry and is anticipating huge sales since it appears so useful. Gary ;)

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