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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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Ralph, your Steiger picture piqqued my interest so I Googled Steiger and found a interesting site on the history of the compay. 1st one built by the Steiger Bos. in the winter of 57-58 and it remained in their hands until 1986 when it was purchased by Tenneco--------Case Ih. Lot's of interesting reading about Steiger on the site I was on. Sorry no URL as they would not let it copy.

Chub, those Steigers are a well respected line of tractors here and I'd be happy to own one. Interesting that they started in the late fifties as I don't recall hearing of them before the 1970s.

Now here is a picture that never has and likely never will show up in any magazine. Thats me alright, sitting on what must be one of the first Steiger tractors. It was on display at the FArm progress show back about 1986. Never seen another one like it.

Ralph..........do I see a loader on an articulated Steiger behind the tractor you're sitting on? That's what it looks like to me, also I didn't know Steiger had loaders unless it's an aftermarket painted in Steiger colors.

Hoot, its too long ago for me to remember but you are right, it certainly does look like a front end loader in the background of that picture of mine. And considering it was at the Steiger display, chances are thats what it was. I have never seen a loader on an articulated tractor that I can recall. If I had to guess I'd say it was a Leon, one of the more popular heavy duty line of front end loaders built here in Sask. Just a guess though.

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Hey guys!

Am I ever proud of you; each and every one of you. I've spent my time tying up other things and need to get out to the shop. I found this on page two!

We drove through a good old eastern Montana ground blizzard much of the way on Friday. It was white yesterday and again today, but our trip home wasn't bad at all.

I'm going to have to digest all of the posts. And a TD-18A will always raise my pulse rate, M Diesel.

My posts on Palouse and good old days, or whatever they were will have to be mine for today. Hopefully tonight or tomorrow I can add more.

Jake had a wonderful birthday party and it was always good to see family again. I had a three hour visit with my ailing Brother Bill at a local restaurant. Talk about "the good old days"? We also got in on a Skypes "call" from Mike on Pam's computer Friday evening and this is the first he'd seen Maw and Paw since he left January 5th.

Gary ;)

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Well I have time for one short post. The picture is of a Port Huron threshing machine that obviously came unhooked from the 20-70 Nichols & Shepard steam engine that was pulling it in North Dakota. I've seen one (McCormick-Deering 28") threshing machine that came unhitched and did that same thing. It really breaks pulleys and brackets on threshers when that happens.

Gary ;)

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Here are a couple of photos of Russell tandem compound engines from my friend Carl Mehmke's steam photo collection.

This first one is a smaller, earlier Russell and I have no idea what horsepower it is.

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This one is a larger Russell tandem compound engine and it is listed as owned by "the Urquant Brothers."

Gary ;)

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I'd gotten an email from Palouse today, who goes by 908harris on youtube. This is a fantastic movie set to music from the 1930s. It is harvest time and I'd sure urge you to visit this site. Push binders, Cats & pull type combines, threshing with a Rumely Oilpull and a super looking old IHC truck hauling grain. You'll like it!

Gary ;)

http://www.youtube.com/user/908harris

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Did I make the other posters mad? I didn't mean to. It's a shame to let this thread die yet.

Gary ;)

Hi Gary, not mad here ,, just some days I lack inspiration to post anything. But as always appreciating the pictures you contribute. Especially the scene of the threshing machine wreck. There were two wrecks on this farm but neither due to road travel. One burned down in a prairie fire when it was less than a year old. The second one got blown over in a wild windstorm and so badly damaged that I think they replaced it rather than try repairing.

The you tube video sounds interesting alright but this dial up is slow as molasses in january sometimes and I just don't have the patience if it is more than a short video. I recently watched a really neat one of a Ford flathead roadster performing. Simply amazing how fast that thing went through the gears. Music to the ears of an old flathead guy like myself. :D

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Hi Gary, not mad here ,, just some days I lack inspiration to post anything. But as always appreciating the pictures you contribute. Especially the scene of the threshing machine wreck. There were two wrecks on this farm but neither due to road travel. One burned down in a prairie fire when it was less than a year old. The second one got blown over in a wild windstorm and so badly damaged that I think they replaced it rather than try repairing.

The you tube video sounds interesting alright but this dial up is slow as molasses in january sometimes and I just don't have the patience if it is more than a short video. I recently watched a really neat one of a Ford flathead roadster performing. Simply amazing how fast that thing went through the gears. Music to the ears of an old flathead guy like myself. :D

Ralph,

I knew nobody was mad, but I'd been gone for three days and everything rolled along fine. Then I came home and posted and nothing for two days... :rolleyes:

I should have added that I think Palouse's video lasts 2:36, is all. It was short enough I looked twice. I hear you about Ford Flathead V-8s. That was "a rattle" I'll never forget. You have your 1939 Ford. I have access to Sharon's 1953 F-350 when I'm in Helena. It IS music. Of course, I also love "the rattle" of my Model T. I'm wondering if it will ever warm up so I can put in water and go driving again. I'll have to check out the youtube you posted.

The two pictures I posted were from my Geiser-Peerless catalog showing their 36hp Model Z-Zs, one pulling disks and the other pulling grain wagons.

Gary ;)

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Hi Gary, Ralph and Delta Dirt and everyone else. I am just getting caught up on my history lesson and thought I would check in quick. Been wanting to do that for a while. Haven't taken the time to post for a while but have been following along as time permits. Haven't had the time to use our new scanner either like I was hoping. One thing I have been doing is corresponding with a fellow in Germany that is related to a friend of mine. I have some old family letters that are written in German and between him and his mother in law, they have translated them for me. The are letters from relatives over there to relatives over here right around WWII and are very facinating. Well it is time to go read stories to 2 little princesses for bed time. Keep up the postings and the pictures. I can't wait to look at those Stieger pictures a little better as this computer won't pull up the pictures.

Wil

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Hi Gary, Ralph and Delta Dirt and everyone else. One thing I have been doing is corresponding with a fellow in Germany that is related to a friend of mine. I have some old family letters that are written in German and between him and his mother in law, they have translated them for me. The are letters from relatives over there to relatives over here right around WWII and are very facinating.

Wil

Hi Wilman

The old letters sound fascinating alright. Especially with the WWII historical aspect. I have some older letters and post cards also written in German. I have been lucky enough to make a contact with someone from Germany who can translate some of them for me.

Gary, since we were mentioning flatheads last night I thought I would show the vehicle I learned to drive on, a 46 Ford two ton truck. Its the dark coloured one facing the camera. I had just repainted it (with a brush and some old green paint I found in the tractor shed) and was pretty proud of it. I parked it up beside my Uncle's newer 49 Mercury 3/4 ton to take the photo. Not too bad for a $2 camera and an amateur photographer. :wacko: This was actually two photos that I blended together into one.

That old flatbed Ford didn't go too fast or very far but I sure had some fun with it. Learned a lot about keeping old engines running too. It definitely got me hooked on V8 engines :D

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Hi Gary, Ralph and Delta Dirt and everyone else. One thing I have been doing is corresponding with a fellow in Germany that is related to a friend of mine. I have some old family letters that are written in German and between him and his mother in law, they have translated them for me. The are letters from relatives over there to relatives over here right around WWII and are very facinating.

Wil

Hi Wilman

The old letters sound fascinating alright. Especially with the WWII historical aspect. I have some older letters and post cards also written in German. I have been lucky enough to make a contact with someone from Germany who can translate some of them for me.

Gary, since we were mentioning flatheads last night I thought I would show the vehicle I learned to drive on, a 46 Ford two ton truck. Its the dark coloured one facing the camera. I had just repainted it (with a brush and some old green paint I found in the tractor shed) and was pretty proud of it. I parked it up beside my Uncle's newer 49 Mercury 3/4 ton to take the photo. Not too bad for a $2 camera and an amateur photographer. :wacko: This was actually two photos that I blended together into one.

That old flatbed Ford didn't go too fast or very far but I sure had some fun with it. Learned a lot about keeping old engines running too. It definitely got me hooked on V8 engines :D

Ralph , do you still have that truck?

I learned on a 51 Ford car, remember pulling into a gas station and asking for $5.00 worth of gas.

The attendent asked me " do you think it will hold that much?"

They held about 15 imperial gal, so gas was about .33cents a gallon.

Ray

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Wil,

It was interesting about your letters. My grandmother had a bunch of old letters from Switzerland that I was able to save. After over a hundred years, we located family there who helped me with the translations.

Ralph & Ray,

It sounds like an excuse for being mistaken, but sometimes I lead with a statement someone can hammer me on, just to learn about what else is in the old machine shed! Ralph then revealed more of his flathead experiences. I like that old 2-ton you learned to drive on. After I graduated from the 1947 Jeep half cab, I went to the Farmall Cub and then I later got to drive Dad's IH K-5 truck in the pasture. I'm putting a picture on again of my honey peering out of the cab of her dad's 1950 Ford 3/4 ton. She drove the heck out of this pickup in her dad's pasture in ensuing years. I remember when he still owned it. He eventually traded it for his 1950 F-350.

Gary

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[Ralph , do you still have that truck?

I learned on a 51 Ford car, remember pulling into a gas station and asking for $5.00 worth of gas.

The attendent asked me " do you think it will hold that much?"

They held about 15 imperial gal, so gas was about .33cents a gallon.

Ray

Ray, the first gas I can remember buying to fill up the tank of the old 39 Ford (car) cost at about 50 cents a gallon I believe. Long time ago since we saw prices like that.

I do still have that 46 Ford truck, more or less. It was converted into a bale wagon in the early seventies. Cab and drive train removed and a 20 foot wooden deck built on the frame. It made a great single axle trailer and has hauled many tons of bales. The cab sits rusting away behind the barn. :(

I'm putting a picture on again of my honey peering out of the cab of her dad's 1950 Ford 3/4 ton. She drove the heck out of this pickup in her dad's pasture in ensuing years. I remember when he still owned it. He eventually traded it for his 1950 F-350.

Gary

Gary, those are some fine looking Fords and I remember when trucks that size were very commonly used to haul grain to the elevator. About 90 bushels per load on 7.50x16 or 17 single tires. Very overloaded and they could sure tear up a road in the spring time when it was a bit muddy. That M-68 in the picture I posted still rests on my Uncle's farm and we have hopes of it being restored some day.

Just curious, did Ford change the number system by 1950? There was no such thing here as an F350 in the lineup til at least 1950 here when the styling changed. The pickups were F47, the number 47 indicated a GVW of 4700 pounds. Same for the F68 having a GVW of 6800 pounds. It went on up the line like that . About the biggest trucks around here were the F155 which would be about a 2and a half ton truck. GVW of 15,500 pounds.

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Gary, Your Ford pick-up pictures startled me cause it brought back memories of one I had just like it including matching color. 17" wheels and boy were replacement tires high-priced. Bought mine at a farm sale. 25,000 miles. Didn't go to buy the truck but the old studebaker was shot and I thought it cheap. Last truck I have had with a stick shift, but it was a good one. Salt ruined the body. Ford made a big change in body steel shortly thereafter and they started to become better in that respect. Have a 2003 Duramax and was under it awhile back and was amazed how good the steel looked. It ought to what with $4.00 diesel.

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Ralph,

While I knew that was a 3/4 ton 1950 Ford, I have to admit, I know nothing about the numbering system Ford used then. I feel like a failure. :blush: I know the 1953 IS a F-350 from the medalion on each side.

Chub,

"Grandpa" put a new pair of 7.50X17" tires on the back while he was still using the truck. I doubt they had 400 miles on them when Sharon got the truck. After it "lived" at our place, I went to the Moore Farmer's Oil Company to see about replacing the weather checked and more worn front tires. I could have ordered and paid for another set like on the back, but they had a pair of 7.00X17" tires in stock and they gave me a good price on them. I knew I'd never wear out any of the tires on it, but wanted it to be in a little better shape for Mike. This picture that turned your crank was taken back in 1973 when I still worked as head painter at Billings Chrysler-Plymouth. Lynn kind of wanted it to look a little better, so he drove it to Billings so I could "throw" some paint on it. That's just about what I did. The color is quite accurate, but I mixed it myself in a paint pail, using a gallon of school bus yellow and some black enamel. The bus paint had set on the shelf there for three years and hadn't been used so the boss told me if I could make something out of it, it was mine.

The picture is another of Palouse pulling Cheney rod weeders behind a TD-9 International crawler.

Gary ;)

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Oh, oh.. I forgot to post this picture of us visiting with son Mike in Afghanistan at Camp Blackhorse last Friday evening, while we were at his home in Helena. It is interesting visiting with the cameras and computers. I think I'd do better saying "over" at the end of a statement? While it is crude, wouldn't the guys from prior wars considered it a real blessing to have been able to get in contact like this once in a while??? Many of those troops went away and were barely heard from for three, four, or five years sometimes.

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Hey... wouldn't I look good in a pony tail? :wacko:

Gary ;)

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Son Mike sent me a couple of pictures from Afghanistan. The first one is of his "terp" (interpereter), which I smudged his face so his identity won't get him or his family harmed, and Mike with a Humvee, after a convoy escorting Marines leaving Camp Blackhorse to Bagram AFB.

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The second picture is of Mike in the Humvee machine gun turret in just a hat. The terp encourages them to do that in safe places. It is easier for the Afghan people to accept our presence when not as agressive appearing. Mike sure has developed a great admiration for the Afghan people and their appreciation for what the military (NATO) is doing for them. That building? That was the queen's palace until destroyed by the Taliban.

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I sure miss Mike and pray for his team and him every day and can't wait until he returns (but I guess I'll just have to?). At least we have more contact then generations of troops ahead of him had. He sounds good and is into his mission.

Well, I need to go get dirty out in the shop again tonight... It's good therapy!

Gary ;)

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While the subject is "old pick up trucks"-----

Can someone identify the make and year of this pickup-----this is apparently a snap shot of my dad riding along one of the field roads. Sorry the picture is not clearer-----started out as a small snap shot and I have enlarged it. Sometimes I think its an early model IHC-----sometimes General Motors; I am somewhat in the dark since I wasn't manufactured until 1943. :blink:

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Another question concerning the Mercury trucks. Were the Mercury trucks only marketed in Canada??? I don't ever remember seeing any here in the states.

Don't know exactly when Ford added in the 50 models------but do remember the earlier ('48----maybe '52) models primarily being F-1, F-2, F3---------F7, F8 models. F-1 = 1/2 ton; F-2 = 3/4 ton; F-3 = 1 ton-----I am thinking that along about '53 they added the F-350 as Gary has pictured, but maybe still had the F-300. Its funny-----but Ford has an apparently factory sponsored "Truck Forum", but it all seems to be geared toward current production models. Real hard to get any information on the older trucks-----or anything above the current F-350 dualies.

Last but not least--------a special thanks to Mike and all of the troops protecting us during these precarious times. Please pass a big ol Mississippi thanks on to Mike------and ask Mike to pass it on to his troops. We've had a U.S. flag flying out front since before noon on 9/11/01. Once a Marine-----always a Marine!!!!-----but salute all of our troops in all branches of service. Thanks for your service.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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Back sorta quick here tonight-----picked up my new edition of "Farm Collector" magazine tonight and found an interesting Letter to the Editor from a Gary Yaeger of Kalispell, Montana----complete with illustrative pictures.

Hey ya'll------that's none other than our Professor Highwheeler himself. Looks like the classroom is expanding Gary. That was a well written and illustrated article on the header barges and binders. I figure the operator on the "seat steer" header must have slept propped in a corner at night-----that had to be a full days work. Don't believe I would want anything but fresh air touching my butt after steering that header all day. :(

Congratulations on your article-----I got a real kick out of turning the page and seeing your name at the bottom of the article.

Probably gonna be out of town for several days------see ya'll next week.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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Delta Dirt,

I'm a 1943 vintage as well. I am not worth a hoot on the F series trucks until you get to the 1953 model.

Your picture... What I see is IHC. Weren't those an S model? There was a Chevy that was close, but I still say IHC.

I'll make sure Mike gets your thanks!

Gary ;)

P.S. Delta,

I got your second message. Rather than being a know it all, as my wife insinuated years ago, I just like to perpetuate history. I'm really glad you enjoyed it. Lost history is really lost! Actually, their sister publication, Steam Traction, which they've recently dropped, I'd probably had 40 stories in it and its predecessor Iron Men Album; clear back to 1958.

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While the subject is "old pick up trucks"-----

Can someone identify the make and year of this pickup-----this is apparently a snap shot of my dad riding along one of the field roads. Sorry the picture is not clearer-----started out as a small snap shot and I have enlarged it. Sometimes I think its an early model IHC-----sometimes General Motors; I am somewhat in the dark since I wasn't manufactured until 1943. :blink:

Another question concerning the Mercury trucks. Were the Mercury trucks only marketed in Canada??? I don't ever remember seeing any here in the states.

Don't know exactly when Ford added in the 50 models------but do remember the earlier ('48----maybe '52) models primarily being F-1, F-2, F3---------F7, F8 models.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

Delta, your truck in the picture looks to me the same as this one I have of a C series IH, early to mid thirties vintage. Thats my best guess anyway.

Re; the Merc trucks, they were sold in Canada from 46 to 68. Ford introduced Merc trucks, Meteor and Monarch cars in 46 here in Canada. Lots of good

history about it here at http://www.mercurypickup.com/merc_history.htm

Heres a quote from that site re the numbering system...

In 1948, Ford (USA) introduced the F-1, F-2, F-3, etc. truck nomenclature. Ford of Canada took a modified tact. It used an "M" for the Mercury, in the place of the "F," but the numeral stood for the truck's Gross Vehicle Weight rating, less the zeros. Thus, a Mercury M-68-designated 6800 pound GVW-corresponded to a Canadian Ford F-68. It got back in step in 1953 when Ford switched to the current F-100, F-250, F-350 numbering scheme with parallel M-100, M-250, M-350 designations for the Mercury.

My second attempt at posting as the first one stalled and went missing while I waited for the page to re-start.

:(

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Good morning Ralph,

THAT'S the truck I was thinking of. I keep wanting to call that C model an S and I don't know why? I'm also glad to hear that 1953 was the first year for the F-350 type designations. Another thing I like about Sharon's 1953 truck is the horn button. It is that 50th Anniversary of the Ford Motor Company horn button. My cousin had a 1953 Ford tractor and it had a similar logo in the hood ornament emblem as well.

Gary ;)

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How many of you remember the wooden water tanks for watering up steam locomotives? I remember several in the Judith Basin as a kid. Every little jumpwater town over there had one on their rail spur.

This first picture reminded me about them. They were a neat structure. I remember one that had a pretty good leak.

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This one is an early Northern Pacific locomotive watering up at Livingston, Montana.

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This is a 1920s picture taken here on the GNRY at Whitefish, Montana, where I work five days a week. Gary ;)

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I've been on the computer and phone with Mike tonight, so this has to be short. When I arrived home today, there was a UPS package on my front porch. I'd taken photos for eBay a couple of years ago, then dropped my digital Nikon and it got venitian blind lines through the photos. A friend found a "stealth recall" (unavertized, only on website), so I sent it in. It stated it didn't matter if it was under warranty or not. It was free of charge except for the USPS to them and insurance. That was in the package, so I downloaded the pictures that were on the card I'd left in it. I haven't used it for about two years. There were some neat old things on it and this is one of them. I have a Milwaukee parts book. IHC bought Milwaukee and their Reaper is shown below. Gary ;)

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