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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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Ralph,

You really are just a kid, aren't you!!! That is a great picture too. I sure see a family resemblance of you and great uncle Ernest. I like his cap too!

Gary ;)

Gary, its true, I was pretty young in that photo and certainly don't recall anything of those days. Which is why the old photos are so valuable to me. They fill in the gaps in my memory.

I'll put on another newer photo of the same barn a couple of years later, me and my Dad beside it.

The second photo is from a parade in town about 1964 I think. Shows a local farmer's Titan tractor pulling a threshing machine that I can't identify. Obviously the streets weren't paved in those days as the way those tractor lugs cut into the surface would make quite a mess of ashphalt.

That gravel pit photo you posted is priceless. Glad they all took the time to shut down the machinery and pose for the camera.

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Obviously the streets weren't paved in those days as the way those tractor lugs cut into the surface would make quite a mess of ashphalt.

Ralph, I am old enough to remember the sign on the 1 mi. of ashphalt north of our small town.

It said ( Tractors with lugs prohibited ).

All the rest of our township roads were gravel at that time.

Gary I think I posted this picture of the TT drive away chassis, before so I included the station bus from my Ford Catalog

Its odd they don,t have a price on the bus, maybe it was to be locally built for the dealer.

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Red Ranger,

Who owns that Jumbo steam engine, do you know? I have a friend, Larry, in Indiana who has a couple of them, I believe? I know he has at least one. This one is a late one, but the company built engines before this design. I've only touched one Harrison Jumbo and it was an early style at my late friend, Oscar O. Cooke's Dreamland Museum near Billings, Montana years ago. I put a picture of Oscar's early model below.

Gary, sorry, no background on that Jumbo, though that pic comes from the Show at Pinckneyville, and Indiana is next door sooo.....???

Been doin' some reading on these lately since Belleville is just an hour or so away from me here in the Land of Lincoln.

Belleville's Harrison Jumbo

As the story goes the early models had 2 forward speeds, but no reverse ???? :unsure:

Could make "belting up" a little "labor intensive" ??? :wacko:

You're right on that one being late, I found one pic of an early one, and as you can see the flywheel is opposite the driver increasing the "belting up" difficulty level even more.

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Also this colorful pic of the "Jumbo" logo...

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Very nice Buick. Back in about 1965, a friend took me to a farmyard near his that had a Buick Roadmaster (1939, I think it was) hulk sitting in the bush. The intake manifold was set up for two carbs. When I was a kid, my neighbor had a Buick 2 door sedan, straight 8, std trans. That thing ran exceptionally smooth and quiet. :P:P

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Ralph,

I like Titans. I remember the signs Ray remembers: Tractors With Lugs Prohibited. Those lugs were destructive to asphalt. I remember my uncle Audie getting fined by the MHP for turning his TD-40 in the middle of the highway, when crossing to get it to his home. The highway disected the county road at a 45 degree angle which the county roads were at 90 degrees to each other.

Wart ECIL,

Somewhere in my stuff at home, I have a picture of the RESTORED Heidrich Holt 120, but I don't have a copy here. This picture I'm posting is of it was taken years before it was restored.

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Ray,

The drive away chassis for the TT was only sold that way at that time. The "Depot Hack" was generally built by a "cabinet shop", from what I've been told. Perhaps, because they pictured one in your catalog, they may have been available on a limited basis? I couldn't tell you.

Red Ranger,

That was interesting the Jumbo you posted had two speeds forward and no reverse. Reversing the valves (reversing the steam admission end to end) for reverse was a commonly known mechanical concept by that time, so I don't understand it. Your post reminded me of the picture I took at Mount Pleasant, IA in 1992 of that ancient Harrison Jumbo there, that was dredged up from a river. I noticed in Engineers & Engines magazine, Brenda posted a story and pictures of this engine under live steam once again last Labor Day Weekend. That really pleases me. This is the only Jumbo traction engine with the smokestack through the steam dome extant.

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kjohn,

You are so right about the smoothness of that Buick straight eight. They purred like a sewing machine. Roger mentioned something about the Buick double carburetors and I don't remember the terminolgy and couldn't locate it in an email. It was called something like "compound carburation" or something like that. I think he said one was the primary supply and the other was like the secondarys of a 4-barrel carburetor; only kicked in when the throttle was floored?

I put another Sears picture on, of the undercarriage of the one he restored for someone else. The Sears engine cranked from the front of the car and the opposed cylinders were outward to each side. The flywheel on the rear of the engine is shown in side view here. The "wheel" behind is the variable "friction drive wheel" that was the "transmission." In the center of the flywheel (neutral detent), it didn't touch, but as its rubber face surface (friction drive wheel) eased outward by lever action, it made contact with the flywheel and started moving the automobile through the chain drive to the rear axles. The further it was moved outward on the flywheel, the faster it went. This is a 1910 Sears. They weren't very refined, or were much more archaic than for instance a 1908 Model T Ford, Maxwell or Hupmobile. Gary ;)

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I had a 39 Buick special 4 door, about 30 years ago. It had the straight 8, and when you say smooth, you don't do it justice. It was the only car I ever balanced a nickle on the valve cover of. If you messed with the idle speed you could almost count the fan blades as they went around. (Raised heck with the oil pressure turning that slow though.) Don't forget locking steering columns. They weren't invented in 1970. Didn't Fords have those in the 30's too?. The seats were like sitting on your living room sofa. Those cars were huge inside. Wow, I wish I had it back. :(

Ahhh, good memories.

Mikem

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I had a 39 Buick special 4 door, about 30 years ago. It had the straight 8, and when you say smooth, you don't do it justice. It was the only car I ever balanced a nickle on the valve cover of. If you messed with the idle speed you could almost count the fan blades as they went around. (Raised heck with the oil pressure turning that slow though.) Don't forget locking steering columns. They weren't invented in 1970. Didn't Fords have those in the 30's too?. The seats were like sitting on your living room sofa. Those cars were huge inside. Wow, I wish I had it back. :(

Ahhh, good memories.

Mikem

Your right Mike, Ford had the locking ignition way back in the 30s. Like my 39 Deluxe sedan here.

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Professor Highwheeler (aka---Gary)

quoting Gary:

"Delta Dirt,

That is sure an interesting piece of equipment those mules are hitched to. I've never ever seen or heard of anything even close to this gismo. I hope someone else may know?"

I had always heard of a gismo (gizmo)-----but never wuz sure of exactly what it wuz. Thanks for a truthful answer----at least I know I am dealing with a truthful professor.

I went ahead and posted this mule drawn "gismo" up over on SmokStak. Maybe we will find some answers yet. Could be that this was a shop made device-----my dad and some of his buddies were not bashful about building off of an idea. After all-----necessity has always been the mother of invention.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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mikem & Ralph,

I knew Ford used the locking steering wheel back in the 1930s (and 1940s?), but couldn't remember for the life of me which years. I used to own a 1936 Ford Coupe "hotrod". It had a 1953 Oldsmobile V-8, but my old "recaller" couldn't remember if it had that or not? I remember the radio that came with it. I wish I'd kept it. It had a box about the size of a good size truck battery and a flex cable that mounted under the dash with the knobs and dial. I never got to see the antenna, but I understand it was up inside the soft top. I don't know where that box mounted, whether under the dash or in the trunk?

Thanks for posting the picture of your 1939 Ford Fordor Deluxe, Ralph. I like the 1939 & 40 Ford styles very much. I had several friends in high school who still drove them. I think they drove them as they lacked funds for newer cars, but I envied the history they drove! I've always been a big sucker for old iron of any kind.

Delta Dirt,

If you notice, I posted over on SS as well about your mule drawn gizmo. Those old timers were very inventive, out of necessity. My dad was one of them too.

I'm not a real professor. I just play one on TV. I'm the second from the last boy in the front row (black & white plaid) at the Glengarry one room school. I can't answer why my mouth was formed like that? I'm obviously not saying "cheese?" Anyway, I was in the first grade and was just working on becoming a professor. This was a very rare sight to me... to be in a COLOR photograph at that time. The district clerk's son took the picture. Many of my cousins and my brother Bill are in the picture.

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I noticed the odometer is going to click over on another milestone again, soon.

Gary ;)

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I'm putting a picture of a TD-9 "TracTracTor" on here. My cousin over in the Judith Basin has an early TD-9 with the square Bosch diesel pump. It has a decal that appears to be standard equipment which is the TracTracTor decal, and if I remember (It has been close to 20 years since I've seen it.) it was on the rear of the fuel tank, below the IH decal. He has another later TD-9 that never had it.

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The second picture is of the Herman Berns Reeves Agency receiving three new double simple Reeves engines and some threshing equipment at Kankakee, IL. He must have liked the special order full length canopies? The front one is a 16hp and the rear two are 20hp steam engines.

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The last picture is of a 32hp Reeves double simple engine in a sawmill belonging to the Wallingford Brothers at Nevis, MN in 1912. Gary ;)

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Here are some photos of my friend Roger's 1925 original Model T Coupe. With a car this nice, you don't restore them! You repair and preserve them. Gary ;) Roger has beautiful old automobiles, but this one is just simply great.

Gary, great looking Model T . Looks like the kind of car you wouldn't be afraid to take out and drive a little. :D

Just referring back to the straight 8 Buick, I found several you tube videos featuring them so finally get an idea of how they sound.

Nice but not quite the heart racing thrill of this hard running flathead Ford.

:blink:
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I'm putting a picture of a TD-9 "TracTracTor" on here. My cousin over in the Judith Basin has an early TD-9 with the square Bosch diesel pump.

I've always liked the appearance of the TD series. That one looks like a hefty machine and no doubt was in it's day. The picture made me think of the bigger machine I saw yesterday. A neighbour had parked his D7G Cat on my land so I stopped to take a look (and of course a picture). That short wide hood looks plenty muscular from the driver's seat and I imagine would feel pretty unstoppable when its plowing through the trees.

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Gary---

With your photo of the 32 hp Reeves operating the sawmill----you refer to it as a "double simple" engine. Can you explain more as to what the "double simple" terminoligy means.

I have no experience with steam engines-----am sure there are others reading these posts that might not know either.

And that's a great picture at the sawmill-----some of those in the photo appear to be young boys (about the same age as some of those young whippersnappers in the school picture) B) . But it won't take long to grow up around a sawmill.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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Gary---

With your photo of the 32 hp Reeves operating the sawmill----you refer to it as a "double simple" engine. Can you explain more as to what the "double simple" terminoligy means.

I have no experience with steam engines-----am sure there are others reading these posts that might not know either.

And that's a great picture at the sawmill-----some of those in the photo appear to be young boys (about the same age as some of those young whippersnappers in the school picture) B) . But it won't take long to grow up around a sawmill.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

Delta Dirt,

Reeves & Company of Columbus, Indiana built two styles or types of steam engines, offering both. I don't have any figures of production records, but this "double simple" type was the lesser sold type in the larger engines, mainly those used for plowing... which was their main intended usage. A double simple had two equal sized cylinder bore and stroke. Each took into its steam chest live steam to be admitted by the valve action. Consequently, they used more water to accomplish the same job their cross compound counter parts did.

The cross compound had a cylinder approximately the same size as the ones on their counterpart double simple brothers. That cylinder used the live steam, exhausted into a receiver then valve action placed that "used" steam into another much larger bore cylinder. The cooler, lower pressure steam from the receiver then reacted on a much larger surface of the low pressure cylinder, allowing that steam to be used twice - but doing the same amount of work. They had an "intercepting valve" which allowed for live steam to be placed into both cylinders for starting loads, or getting out of tight spaces when they are lugging down.

My GUESS is that in the 25 & 32hp Reeves plow engines, 7/8 of those engines produced were of the "cross compound" design. However, the double simple engines were more popular in their smaller sizes. The 20 & 16hp sizes were probably 3/4 double simple to their counterpart cross compound brothers. Their Big Forty horsepower engine was only available as a cross compound engine.

I placed a photo of a 25hp CROSS COMPOUND on so you can compare the cylinder head sizes, explaining what I was talking about above. Gary ;)

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I'm putting a picture of a TD-9 "TracTracTor" on here. My cousin over in the Judith Basin has an early TD-9 with the square Bosch diesel pump.

I've always liked the appearance of the TD series. That one looks like a hefty machine and no doubt was in it's day. The picture made me think of the bigger machine I saw yesterday. A neighbour had parked his D7G Cat on my land so I stopped to take a look (and of course a picture). That short wide hood looks plenty muscular from the driver's seat and I imagine would feel pretty unstoppable when its plowing through the trees.

Ralph,

This morning opened up on page 310, so I answered Delta Dirt, but didn't look backward until after I'd posted. I don't often do that, but I apologize. I'm glad you finally got to hear the straight eight Buick engine. Yes they are smooth and quiet... Like I said, a sewing machine motor. The throb of a Ford flathead V-8 is more adrenalin forming, I'm sure.

And the TD series always did something for me too. It breaks my heart. With all of the scrap iron headed for China, there have been about 25 old worn out logging crawlers hauled into our local scrapyard. There is one TD-24 setting there with that 1091 cubic inch engine just begging someone to save it. It makes me want to bawl. I remember very well seeing my first TD-24 as a boy on a construction project in central Montana.

Gary ;)

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GuDay All

Gary

Got letter in mail, Thanks

Here is a pic of that -- Trac Trac Tor -- that you spoke of.

It is not all that clear but shows it. It was a 1940 Td 6 taken on

our farm in 1940.

John

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Here's another one, TD 18 clearing out roads after the blizard of march 1947

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GuDay All

Gary

Got letter in mail, Thanks

Here is a pic of that -- Trac Trac Tor -- that you spoke of.

It is not all that clear but shows it. It was a 1940 Td 6 taken on

our farm in 1940.

John

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Here's another one, TD 18 clearing out roads after the blizard of march 1947

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John,

I'm glad you got my letter. Once more, I appreciate the effort you went to, to get me top notch decals for my TD-40. With spring coming, one snow flake at a time, I'm anxious to get the old girl finished. I sure wonder what our countries do with our mail. I sent it the next day after I received my decals and shipped it "Air Mail!" Maybe the US plane headed that way couldn't afford av gas? :rolleyes:

I'm glad to see that I'm not day dreaming about the TracTracTor decal. It was just that, not the same decal as the TD-40 uses. That looks just like the one on the back of my cousin's TD-9. Thanks for posting your pictures. That has to be a pretty early TD-18 too, doesn't it? I can't say that I've seen another photo of a TD-18 with side curtains on. I'm sure the artist's concepts in my 150 Years of International Harvester shows them? I know that TD-65 TracTracTor had them. I sure recognize the lift arms of the Bucyrus-Erie dozer or bull grader.

Gary ;)

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I just bumped into this picture of the Urquant Brothers STACK threshing with a large Russell tandem compound steam engine in Nebraska.

Delta Dirt,

This steam engine in my picture is also a compound steam engine, but notice it is in tandem. The large front low pressure cylinder receives exhaust steam from the rear high pressure cylinder. They both drove the same connecting rod on the same crankshaft pin. There was negligable horsepower advantage and it was argued that they were more efficient, i.e., used less water and less coal. That was debatable too. While Russell sold quite a few tandem compound engines, most sold were simple single cylinder engines. Other companies such as Case, Advance, Port Huron, and many others tried it out and Port Huron basically stuck with the compound throughout production, most dropped the theory. Railroads tried the Mallet compound locomotives, which were four cylinder engines. They employed a pair of high pressure on the rear set of drivers and a low pressure pair on the front set of drivers, they nearly all had them eventually changed over to simple (non-compound) articulated engines at later dates, when scheduled for an overhaul.

Gary

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John,

That is a nice looking Port Huron. It looks like a smaller size than some? I like it. I think I have pictures of two Port Hurons that aren't tandem compound. They offered a simple engine, but sold very few.

This picture I posted is of my friend Beth's 24-75 Port Huron, shown at Wauseon, Ohio at the NTA this past June. She has been secretary or treasurer of that organization for many, many years. This Port Huron TC is one that was owned by the late LeRoy Blaker, who started the NTA at his farm near Alvordton, Ohio nearly 65 years ago and it is purportedly the oldest steam show in the USA. This Port Huron and another with rubber tires on the front, were the two engines LeRoy started his show with.

I noticed the odometer ticked over before I got here tonight, John.

Gary ;)

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Delta Dirt,

I saw this picture of my lifelong Tyler friend's 40hp Gaar Scott at Moore(Eddie's Corner), Montana and it reminded me that this engine has a "double tandem compound" engine. It has two high pressure cylinders and two low pressure cylinders.

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Notice the long rod and loop handle in this picture. This rod admits live steam into the low pressure cylinders to assist in a hard pull. There is this 40hp Gaar Scott and one at a Canadian museum. The rest of them perished. Gary ;)

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Delta Dirt,

Reeves wasn't the only one to build cross compound engines here in the USA and Canada. They were very popular in Europe as well. This first picture is of my friend Dave Vanek's 30hp Advance cross compound over in the Judith Basin at the Lewistown old iron show.

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The next is an old picture my late steam friend Tom Stebritz sent me of an Advance 40hp cross compound being fired on straw and powering a belt, likely turning a thresher.

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The next picture shows a 34hp cross compound Northwest at left. The other engines are a 30hp undermounted Avery, a 22hp Minneapolis return flue and the last is a Canadian built Sawyer-Massey 26hp tandem compound.

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The last was a short lived Stevens cross compound undermounted engine. This Wisconsin built engine was short lived in that Avery sued them for the undermounted design and Stevens lost and ceased production. Gary ;)

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Delta Dirt,

I should have posted these two up with the Tyler's 40hp Gaar Scott, but my head wasn't working. These two pictures are also of "double tandem compound" engines. This first one is of a Port Huron Highwheeler showing its four cylinder arrangement. Notice the trunion type plowing drawbar.

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This last picture is of a 45hp Minneapolis double tandem compound. My late steam friend Tom Stebritz also sent me this picture. Gary ;)

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Thanks for the explanations on the steamers----need to look at some up close, but sure have a better understanding than before.

The old steamers are definitely "big iron"----the "massiveness of their size" always caught my attention. Had to take some power just to move the engine along----let alone pull the plows. But it might be the steam whistles that are what really intrique me. Might be that I need a steam whistle worse than I need a steam engine. :wub::rolleyes:

I have been wanting to mount one on my propane powered F700 truck and blow it off of the propane vapor. Have watched the steam whistles sell on e-bay------doubtful that I will ever spring for the $$$$ a good whistle will bring, but have tinkered aroung with building me a home made one. Even bought a set of plans that show making a whistle up out of PVC pipe. Maybe I'll get around to playing with it again this spring.

Looks like all old grey headed "kids" ought to have a steam whistle-----especially one mounted on his "watermellon" truck. :wacko:

Next time some of you "steamers" have one fired up------blow that whistle once for ol Delta Dirt!!! :wub:

And since this is a RedPower forum-----attached is a photo of the "watermelon" truck hauling an old faded and rusty, but red F-20 carcass home this past summer.

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note the yellow air supply tank for the whistle------>

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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