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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy
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I brought the following post forward from F-20's thread relating to a registery for serial #s-----might be someone over here that can shed some light on the beginning Farmall Regular serial # (confirm or prove otherwise on what I have posted below)------if nothing else get a laugh out of part of the story.

F-20---

I thought M's were new tractors---------and I remember when I wuz a kid when my dad would say "take the new M----and go do such and such to one of the farmhands".

He had been the original Farmall/IHC dealer here in Greenville Mississippi back in the mid 20's and supposedly sold the first Farmall Regular that came into the Mississippi Delta in 1926 (I am thinking)----and bought one of the early Regulars himself in 1926. My dad always said that the Regular serial numbers started at 500 or 501----I am thinking a number like QC-501 (he used to quote them from memory---but died in 1983). He also always thought that Harvester skipped some numbers occasionally (maybe as a little marketing strategy to keep the competiors guessing)----but who knows???

He was one to be in the know-----his dealership sold more tractors in one year than all of the Memphis district combined----Harvester Co. encouraged him to sell the dealership and come to work out of Chicago as a "Farmall expert" travelling the southeast----of which he did. He used to tell the story that he sold so many Farmall's that he got to believing that you could farm with them--------came home to farm in the spring of 1930 (just before the crash) and got so broke that he didn't have any option but to keep on farming.

He also said that one of their favorite tricks to use if they thought they might be about to lose the sale to John Deere would to be to claim that Deere was coming out with a four cylinder engine tractor next year----they had seen Deere's experimental version. Course John Deere did leave the old "obsolete" 2 cylinders in 1960 (30+ years later).

I've got a list of serial #s on some these old tractors that we've still got----but will have to hunt them up. Don't throw in the towell-----this would be a great accomplishment if you can get a registery organized. Good luck

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

as I am typing and thinking-----Regular production may have started up in 1924 (??)-------somebody fill me in (like the song said: "............and my head stays sorta foggy all the time"!!!!!

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I suppose you are next going to tell us you also used clothes pins and playing cards to simulate a "motor" on your bicycle? Actually, they sounded pretty good?!!!

Well, I guess I should step up here and admit that I did use cardboard and clothespins on my bicycle spokes. Just to add a little technical detail here, if your wheel happened to be missing a spoke or two, the sound effect was closer to the mighty V8, instead of the plain old 6 banger. I can't recall if we used playing cards, but I do remember "liberating" a few clothes pins!! I can remember a couple of guys even had whip aerials (sp?) and mudflaps on their bikes. Cool beyond the limit!! :P:P

A way off topic, but here's a nifty model with the latest tread design. This one is at the Alberta-Reynolds museum in Wetaskawin, AB

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Delta Dirt,

All International Harvester tractor series started serial numbers at xxx501. For example my 1939 Farmall H is FBH681, or the 181st one built. I learned that as an IH partsman in the 1970s. We had a couple of Regulars when I was a small boy. I wish I still had one of them. They were used for haying and had mowers mounted. I too have a heck of a time, even today, calling the H & M an "old" tractor since I sat on them when they were brand new in the IH dealership showroom. Now my F-12 on steel, that's an "old" IH tractor. The 4-cylinder Titan Dad had, that was a "real old" IH tractor.

kjohn,

Yes, besides mounting playing cards with clothes pins, the bike was missing a spoke. I didn't realize that made it a V-8 (bonk!). And I mounted a rear mudflap, so it didn't throw mud up on your back. It had some red reflectors mounted in a tin medalion. And I remember some streamers of sorts that came out of the hole in the end of the handlebars. I guess we couldn't afford a whip antenna? It seems like we did have a front mounted basket and a rear view mirror though. This was actually my brother's bike, but I got to use it some.

That is a great looking Canadian tractor. They must have been pretty scarce? This isn't the first I've seen a picture of, but maybe only the second or third.

Gary ;)

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Red Ranger & Loadstar,

Why not post these again. I just re-posted them on SmokStak, as they were in the middle of discussing the Baker fan as well. The first one has the airfoil on it, with the explanation of the gizmo. The second picture shows my late friend Austin Monk's 50hp Case turning it at my place about 15 years ago. The third picture shows son Mike turning it with our 15hp Case about 14 years ago. That is builder and friend, Doug McDougall, beside the driver wheel.

One year at Belgrade, they had hay bales stacked around the back side, so people couldn't get too close to the rotating fan blades. A man asked what it was for and we said we were trying to dry the hay out.

Gary ;)

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My friend Roger sent me this picture of all of his cars at his place last summer. They are some fine looking cars. I don't know the age of that 1940s Buick on the left, but I sure wouldn't mind owning it! (The Buick is a 1948 Buick Special Sedanet, 2-door, straight-8.) The next car is a 1927 Model T Touring car. It has new tires and has been repainted. The upholstery and top are original. The middle (Coupe) is a completely original 1925 Model T and is very nice. Next is his beautifully restored 1914 Model T Touring Car and the last at the right is the 1908 Sears.

After seeing that middle coupe and the original paint, it reminds me in 1967 when I had my Model T Coupe in a parade in Lewistown. I had it in dark gray primer. An old gentleman came up to me after the parade and thanked me for having the "correct color" of paint on it. He said all this shiny black paint isn't what Model Ts looked like...After two years outside, they looked like mine. I guess that is the conclusion one would make when looking at this one?

Gary ;)

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My friend Roger sent me this picture of all of his cars at his place last summer. They are some fine looking cars. I don't know the age of that 1940s Buick on the left, but I sure wouldn't mind owning it! The next car is a 1927 Model T Touring car. It has new tires and has been repainted. The upholstery and top are original. The middle (Coupe) is a completely original 1925 Model T and is very nice. Next is his beautifully restored 1914 Model T Touring Car and the last at the right is the 1908 Sears.

After seeing that middle coupe and the original paint, it reminds me in 1967 when I had my Model T Coupe in a parade in Lewistown. I had it in dark gray primer. An old gentleman came up to me after the parade and thanked me for having the "correct color" of paint on it. He said all this shiny black paint isn't what Model Ts looked like...After two years outside, they looked like mine. I guess that is the conclusion one would make when looking at this one?

Gary ;)

Gary,here,s a couple more pictures from my Ford Catalog.

How about those prices?

Ray

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Ray,

Thanks so much for sending those catalog cuts along for us. The Canadian Model Ts had subtle differences in design than ours. The windshields in the earlier roadsters as you posted have both opening glasses. Ours never had that until 1926. Just the top section tipped out on the US models comparable to your post. I'm not real familiar with the earlier coupes as they have the "suicide" doors. Ours had them, but I'm not certain of the years. The coupe you posted appears to be a circa 1920, but the rearward slope of the roadster windshield posts would indicate late 1923 on a US model. It's very interesting anyway.

You caused me to get out my book, "Model T Ford by Bruce W. McCalley" to see what I could find for prices. He posted the Improved Ford models of 1926-27 and the "plain Jane-vanilla" Roadster or Runabout sold for $290. It included standard equipment of weatherproof storm curtains opening with both doors, windshield wiper, nickled headlamp rims and four cord tires. Starter and demountable rims $85 extra. Balloon tires $25 extra.

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Gary---

Thanks for the feedback on the Farmall serial #s starting @ 501. And this is my kind of technology-----what with the highly scientific classifications of new, old, and real old. B)

So while on the subject of automobiles-----here is an old photo of a touring rally that had stopped off in Grace, Mississippi (circa WWI). State Hwy. 16 is laid on top of the old rail bed now----note the railroad depot in the background. Also note the dirt street and parking area----good thing it wasn't raining.

Anybody able to identify any of these autombobiles??? post-1200-1205211520_thumb.jpg

Grace, Ms is approximately 20 miles South of me along state Hwy 1 and a few miles Northwest of Rolling Fork for anybody familiar with the Mississippi Delta area.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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My friend Roger sent me this picture of all of his cars at his place last summer. They are some fine looking cars. I don't know the age of that 1940s Buick on the left, but I sure wouldn't mind owning it! The next car is a 1927 Model T Touring car. It has new tires and has been repainted. The upholstery and top are original. The middle (Coupe) is a completely original 1925 Model T and is very nice. Next is his beautifully restored 1914 Model T Touring Car and the last at the right is the 1908 Sears.

Gary ;)

Gary, my favourite in that pic is the 40 Buick. I just have a preference for cars of the 40s and 50s. But since you have a liking for the Model T I thought you might find this pic of interest. I've read about the "tractor conversions" available for the Model T and I guess this is one of them being used to pull a binder. First time I have seen a remote drive setup for the car though. I notice there is only a steering control, nothing for the clutch? Must have made it interesting stopping and starting up. :blink:

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Delta Dirt,

All International Harvester tractor series started serial numbers at xxx501.

Gary ;)

1921 saw the first 15-30's roll off the line. they started at serial number TG112

W-12's started with WS503 in 1934

O-12's started with OS512 in 1934

I-12's started with IS512 in 1934

so not all of them started with 501. in 1938 when all the 12 series tractors turned into 14 series tractors instead of starting over like one would normally think to do with a new model, they simply kept going on the numbers where the 12 series left off :wacko:

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Well, let's try it again. I've gotten the egg wiped off of my face now.

Delta Dirt,

That is a great picture you posted there of those neat old automobiles. I notice they all had electric headlights by whatever year this was, at least 1916? I don't know what a single one of them are? I have a book that is an automobile encyclopedia at home. There have been thousands and thousands of automobiles manufactured over the years and most of them I've never heard of. During that time period, there were Multitudes of manufacturers who may not have built a dozen (likely less?) by the time they went out of business.

Ralph,

I re-posted the information about that 1948 Buick Special Sedanet two door. I like it too. I rode in a 1946 or 47 Buick convertible in Los Angles at 3 years old. I'll never forget how that straight-8 and automatic transmission made its sound when it took off from, YES... stop lights. Kind of reminded me a little bit of flushing a toilet. Thanks for posting the "make-a-tractor" type conversion on the Model T Touring car. I'm trying to figure that one out as well. I notice something at the same angle as the steering wheel, about 6" below the steering wheel. I wonder what that had to do with the conversion? I'm wondering if there wasn't something that you pushed on the steering wheel, pushing the shaft forward and there wasn't some kind of mechanism that would put the Model T in neutral?

I've put on a picture of mine again, showing a Model T tractor conversion at Chena Hot Springs, Alaska.

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The next picture is of My uncle Orvis and aunt Bertha with their Model T Touring car atop the Continental Divide outside Helena on McDonald Pass, circa 1920. Orvis worked for the Sieben Ranch near there. It is one of the larger spreads in Montana. Our Montana senior US senator Max S(ieben). Baucus, Chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, is a member of the family that owns the ranch.

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The last picture is of a 40-65 Reeves gas tractor and Reeves threshing machine. The nose of a 1914 Model T is there, as is the owner. The owner was my friend, Chady Atteberry's father. Chady is known nationwide for his expertise on Case steam engines and Model T Fords. The picture was taken in 1921. Gary

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Well, let's try it again. I've gotten the egg wiped off of my face now.

Delta Dirt,

That is a great picture you posted there of those neat old automobiles. I notice they all had electric headlights by whatever year this was, at least 1916? I don't know what a single one of them are? I have a book that is an automobile encyclopedia at home. There have been thousands and thousands of automobiles manufactured over the years and most of them I've never heard of. During that time period, there were Multitudes of manufacturers who may not have built a dozen (likely less?) by the time they went out of business.

Ralph,

I re-posted the information about that 1948 Buick Special Sedanet two door. I like it too. I rode in a 1946 or 47 Buick convertible in Los Angles at 3 years old. I'll never forget how that straight-8 and automatic transmission made its sound when it took off from, YES... stop lights. Kind of reminded me a little bit of flushing a toilet. Thanks for posting the "make-a-tractor" type conversion on the Model T Touring car. I'm trying to figure that one out as well. I notice something at the same angle as the steering wheel, about 6" below the steering wheel. I wonder what that had to do with the conversion? I'm wondering if there wasn't something that you pushed on the steering wheel, pushing the shaft forward and there wasn't some kind of mechanism that would put the Model T in neutral?

I've put on a picture of mine again, showing a Model T tractor conversion at Chena Hot Springs, Alaska.

post-5643-1205263796_thumb.jpg

The next picture is of My uncle Orvis and aunt Bertha with their Model T Touring car atop the Continental Divide outside Helena on McDonald Pass, circa 1920. Orvis worked for the Sieben Ranch near there. It is one of the larger spreads in Montana. Our Montana senior US senator Max S(ieben). Baucus, Chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, is a member of the family that owns the ranch.

post-5643-1205263833_thumb.jpg

The last picture is of a 40-65 Reeves gas tractor and Reeves threshing machine. The nose of a 1914 Model T is there, as is the owner. The owner was my friend, Chady Atteberry's father. Chady is known nationwide for his expertise on Case steam engines and Model T Fords. The picture was taken in 1921. Gary

Gary, in ON, the most common car to tractor kit was the Auto Trac, My uncle had one I think was a coverted model T.

I will try to find a picture.

Ray

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Old F-20,

You got me...! I guess I was speaking of the ones we were selling parts for, not the old unstyled stuff. Thanks for the correction.

Gary ;)

ewwww, after 39 you guys all have me stumped but im pretty sure your corect on everything starting at 501 :)

one other one i forgot was the International 15-30 (Flaming four) they started at TS101 in 1915, revised in 1917 and had TW-101 then, and in 1918 changed once again and started with EC-501 :blush:

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Old F-20,

You got me...! I guess I was speaking of the ones we were selling parts for, not the old unstyled stuff. Thanks for the correction.

Gary ;)

ewwww, after 39 you guys all have me stumped but im pretty sure your corect on everything starting at 501 :)

one other one i forgot was the International 15-30 (Flaming four) they started at TS101 in 1915, revised in 1917 and had TW-101 then, and in 1918 changed once again and started with EC-501 :blush:

When you get into the newer ones 1206 started at 7501 and the 1456 at 10001, 1466 at 7101 and the 86,s at 8601

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Old-F20 & Ray,

I must have only listened to part of what I was told when a partsman. The 56 models were out then and the 66 models were out before I quit. Maybe I should have just said, "the Letter series started at XXX501? The old boy I learned (attempted to learn??) the parts department from was bordering on genious. He knew the parts number of just about any tractor, combine, implement, truck and Scout part in the store. He knew which bin it was in and before the gasoline shortages, which spiraled up parts prices, he had the most of the prices memorized. If we were fairly slack, he'd let me look things up and go through the longhand method. If we were busy, he'd give me the parts number and the parts bin number. I'm sure he didn't know the transmission housing number on an 806 but he knew the parts numbers of what went inside.

Roger sent me a couple more pictures of his cars. The first is of his 1948 Buick Special Sedanet. Ralph, I hope you enjoy the picture. I really like this automobile as well. They were of a very classic era of auto manufacturing.

Of course being a Model T nut, I really like this picture of his 1927 Touring Car. He says it is original, except has a paint job and tires. The upholstery and top are original. Gary ;)

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Roger sent me a couple more pictures of his cars. The first is of his 1948 Buick Special Sedanet. Ralph, I hope you enjoy the picture. I really like this automobile as well. They were of a very classic era of auto manufacturing.

Of course being a Model T nut, I really like this picture of his 1927 Touring Car. He says it is original, except has a paint job and tires. The upholstery and top are original. Gary ;)

Hi Gary

That Buick is a beauty alright. I've never heard a straight eight running and wonder how it compares to a V8? Wonder if anyone ever split the manifold on these engines and put in dual exhausts? I have read that in the early fourties Buick offered "compound carburetion" on the straight eight. Sort of the same idea as the later four barrel carbs. The second carb would only open up under heavy loads (foot pressure). Apparently they went back to the single carbs because it was difficult to keep the two carbs working properly and they also had a thirsty appetite for gas.

Here is an old ad I have showing a 51 Buick with the "fireball 8"

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Ralph,

I was not acquainted with the "compound carburation" utilized by the Buick straight eight. These overhead valve engines sound nothing like a V-8, since all exhaust exits through the same manifold on the same side of the engine. It doesn't sound like a 6-cylinder engine, because there are more cylinders. I can't say that I ever heard a split manifold on one?

I had a friend near Moore(Eddie's Corner), Montana who owned two Lincoln Zephyr sedans with the flathead V-12 engines. They didn't sound like a V-8 either, as there were more cylinders "filling in the blanks" in the exhaust.

I know we talked about it before, but how you'd recognize the sounds of engines such as the Ford flathead V-8 or the Green Diamond flathead six in 1940s IH trucks. I had a B-170 with a (I think?) BD-268(9?), overhead 6-cylinder. It was also used in the KB-6 & KB-7. They had one "jagged" edge on their valve covers. All of the engines above that I've explained; I'd know any of them blindfolded, upon hearing them running. Another engine I'd recognize, I think, is the Chevy 6-cylinder and especially with a split manifold.

Gary ;)

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Delta Dirt,

All International Harvester tractor series started serial numbers at xxx501.

Gary

1921 saw the first 15-30's roll off the line. they started at serial number TG112

W-12's started with WS503 in 1934

O-12's started with OS512 in 1934

I-12's started with IS512 in 1934

so not all of them started with 501. in 1938 when all the 12 series tractors turned into 14 series tractors instead of starting over like one would normally think to do with a new model, they simply kept going on the numbers where the 12 series left off :wacko:

Byt hte sounds of it the parts book states the First WD-40 was 508. but theres a guy out there who claims he knows of 501 2 3 and 4? -_- (i think he owns one) what do you know about them?

Old F-20,

ewwww, after 39 you guys all have me stumped but im pretty sure your corect on everything starting at 501 :)

one other one i forgot was the International 15-30 (Flaming four) they started at TS101 in 1915, revised in 1917 and had TW-101 then, and in 1918 changed once again and started with EC-501 :blush:

When you get into the newer ones 1206 started at 7501 and the 1456 at 10001, 1466 at 7101 and the 86,s at 8601

the SW6TA started at 10001 too. but im assuming since the SW6 got over 9000 they just rounded off to start off 1954 ;)

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Okay, you guys won the arm wrestling "contest" over IH tractor serial numbers. I apologize for posting anything about them. I'll admit, I don't know crap about it.

I'm posting three pictures my friend Tom Madden sent me of a Holt Steam Crawler built by 79 year young master craftsman, Don Hunter. This only example of a Holt steam crawler will be operating under live steam at the Best Show on Tracks at Woodland, California June 20-22, 2008. Don started with an original crankshaft and fabricated the rest of it, and added some castings. (Note casting patterns on the wall in 3rd picture.) The "motor" (engine proper) is fabricated and welded from steel. Some might call this "a replica" or a "12 inches to the foot scale model" but with that original crankshaft, it could be called "a restoration." Like Tom said, if you send a data plate to Ferarri, they will "restore" or recreate the automobile for you.

Tom sent this information regarding the show at Woodland.

Here are some pictures of Don Hunter's full scale Holt Steam Crawler No. 111. This will premere at the Best Show on Tracks in Woodland, CA., June 20-22, 2008. For information on the show go to www.bestshowontracks.org and look at the links. In short, this will be the LARGEST gathering of early Best, Holt and Cat tractors yet.

This Holt is approximately 24 feet long, 10 feet wide and 14 feet tall to the top of the stack. Don has constructed the Holt using an original crank shaft and fabricating everything else. Don will operate the Holt each day of the show. It will start on wood and then operate on diesel. Also appearing will be the 1906 Best 110 Steam engine pulling the only operational Best Harvester in the world (powered by a Best 75 engine) and a 1905 Holt ground propelled harvester pulled by 26 mules. We will be cutting grain each day. 25 total acres of grain will be harvested over the 3 days of the show.

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I placed this link below but couldn't get it to post in blue, where you could just click on it. I guess you'll have to cut and paste it, unless someone else can post it in an intelligent manner. I'm not smart enough to do that. Hey... All luck; no skill, it worked!!! Gary ;)

http://www.bestshowontracks.org/

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Hi Gary and everyone

I can't believe it has been a 1 1/2 weeks since I last posted on here and that was over 10 pages and how many posts back? I started catching up on my reading and history lesson last Friday and am finally caught up to date but please don't make me take a test :D

We finally have a new scanner here so I have a lot of pictures to scan and if you will let me, post some on here. To try the new scanner out, I had to scan these 3 old pictures of barns being built. 2 of these barns are I believe were on my families farms and the 3rd old barn is 1 of 2 old barns in the neighborhood that are very similar. Unfortunatly the barns on the family farms are not standing anymore but the 2 neighbor barns that are similiar to the one being built in the 3rd picture are still standing. I do have some original barn boards of the home farm barn that our neighbor saved to use to fix up his barn that he gave me. His barn could possibly be the 3rd barn being built....

Here is the barn that I think used to be on where I grew up:

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Here is I believe the barn that was on our other farm that was my grandfathers farm:

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Here is the 3rd barn that is a possibility of 1 of 2 barns on neighbor farms that are still standing. The photo quality of this picture isn't the best any more:

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I hope all of you enjoy these pictures.

Wil

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I'm posting three pictures my friend Tom Madden sent me of a Holt Steam Crawler built by 79 year young master craftsman, Don Hunter.

This Holt is approximately 24 feet long, 10 feet wide and 14 feet tall to the top of the stack. Don has constructed the Holt using an original crank shaft and fabricating everything else.

Gary, thats quite the acheivement to build a tractor around a crankshaft. Reminds me of a comment I heard by a fellow who was proud to still be using great grand dad's hammer. Even though he has replaced the handle twice and the head once. :P

Hi Gary and everyone

To try the new scanner out, I had to scan these 3 old pictures of barns being built. 2 of these barns are I believe were on my families farms and the 3rd old barn is 1 of 2 old barns in the neighborhood that are very similar. Unfortunatly the barns on the family farms are not standing anymore but the 2 neighbor barns that are similiar to the one being built in the 3rd picture are still standing. I do have some original barn boards of the home farm barn that our neighbor saved to use to fix up his barn that he gave me. His barn could possibly be the 3rd barn being built....

Wil

Wil, its great to see your barn building photos. I only wish I had some of the old barns being built here. I have photos of the finished product but not the actual building. I do have a few pics of the current "new barn" built in 1954. My great Uncle Ernest , before coming to Canada, was a bricklayer in his homeland of Essex, England. He made good use of that trade over here helping in the construction of many brick buildings and chimneys. In this photo it shows the cindercrete blocks he used in the lower portion of the barn. Above that it was poplar lumber construction. I might get a picture of the finished barn on here tomorrow if time permits.

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I like those old barn pictures too-----I've got a few shots of scenic barns, but they are lost in my old 35mm shots. Have stopped along the road and snapped a many a photo of country churches, old school buildings and barns as I travelled. Need to find some of them and scan over to the computer. Not many of the old "big" barns standing down here anymore----gradually fading away.

The little dog (14--15 yrs old) has me awake @ 2:00 in the morning---not usually up at this time of the day. So----while I am hoping she will fall to sleep at my feet here under the computer------thought I would post this picture up in hopes of someone identifying exactly what they are doing here.

This photo came out of some of my dad's pictures that would have been dated "circa----1930's". Its really hard to date-----we had alot of mule power down here in the South even after WWII. I have marked the photo to show what appears to be a chain drive off of a large diameter sprocket on the big wheel----driving a small sprocket. Also---looks like maybe a rotary drum that the chain drive would be turning????. Looks to be at least partially wooden construction. The crop looks to be Corn-----with a mixture of weeds.

My speculation is that this may be a silage cutter----or Corn puller. Anybody able to shed any light on this operation??? The mules look to be well worn-----but are showing their contentment with those ears laid back-----that's a good sign. And-----it don't look like nobody was in a hurry here. :opost-1200-1205392869_thumb.jpg

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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Wil,

Those are interesting barn raising pictures. I've never been close to one, but have studied them a little and that would have been a great sight to see.

Ralph,

You really are just a kid, aren't you!!! That is a great picture too. I sure see a family resemblance of you and great uncle Ernest. I like his cap too!

Delta Dirt,

That is sure an interesting piece of equipment those mules are hitched to. I've never ever seen or heard of anything even close to this gismo. I hope someone else may know?

My friend Roger emailed me an utterly fantastic photo! This photo was taken at the Link Gravel Pit at Racine, Minnesota in 1923. There are 12 Model TT Fords, a shovel hood IHC, an unknown behind the right guy in the closeup Model TT, a steam shovel, wooden water wagon and the near wagon is actually a fuel wagon as evidenced by the spigots on the rear (left). Roger thanks for allowing this coveted photo to hit the internet.

One would really have to scrounge to recreate this photo! Ford still didn't build his own truck cabs by this time in 1923, so all of these came as drivable chassis units then had custom cabs installed. Some built their own cabs, some had carpenters or cabinet makers build cabs, and the boxes were homebuilt as well. By late 1923, Henry developed his open sided C-Cab truck cab and the metal side "pickup" style box with rear fenders, but came out as the 1924 model.

Gary ;)

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