Jump to content

IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

Recommended Posts

Ray we have a local fella in town that drives a very similar early car maybe Hewitt? often in the summer, him on one side his German Sheperd on the other, he seems to enjoy his lifes pace than many others I witness :unsure:

I think thats the one he rescued from a bone yard many years ago, takes it to a lot of parades.

It is chain drive with a 2 cyl opposed engine.

Ray

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My son Mike still has that Round Oak parlor stove stored in his shop at Helena, since it is one his great-grandpa Simpson brought to Moore(Eddies Corner), Montana in 1916 on a Milwaukee RR Immigrant Train, much like the one I posted last night.

Gary ;)

I recall that stove Gary, and I think I posted a picture of a similar one that I have here. Western Oak if I recall the name right. Not sure where this stove originated but its been in the family a long time.

Thought I'd post another Holt picture. This big crawler is pulling a multiple seed drill hitch of four drills. Guessing they are ten footers so they are seeding 40 feet per pass. Not bad for the time. I'm only pulling 28 feet at seeding time. Of course I see it takes 5 men to run that operation whereas I am doing it all myself.

The date is 1920. Location unknown.

post-90-1204822920_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ralph,

That's another great shot of a 75 Holt. Keep posting them! That is a good stretch of drills. I put a picture of Charles Colwell's seeding operation in the Judith Basin, pulling what appears to be five 12' drills? I'm not sure about that, but the Reeves steam engine is a 32hp cross compound Canadian Special.

post-5643-1204834618_thumb.jpg

Ray,

That is the neatest looking little automobile, circa 1904, whatever it is? I'd be proud to own that one. Thanks for posting that picture as well.

My friend Roger is shown in a 1910 Highwheeler IHC in snow. He (authentically) wrapped the rear wheels with rope and said they were known to go just about anywhere they wanted to in deep snow. His son Andy is in the seat with him, circa 1980.

post-5643-1204834711_thumb.jpg

This is the air cooled IHC engine running in a 1909 Highwheeler Roger restored and is running in, before restoring the rest and putting the body on. Gary ;)

post-5643-1204834743_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This first picture is one of Roger's 1912 Autowagon Highwheeler in his back yard. Notice his beautiful 1914 Model T Touring Car there also.

post-5643-1204837807_thumb.jpg

This picture is of a 1917 International Harvester Model H Truck he restored and owned by another gentleman.

post-5643-1204837868_thumb.jpg

This last post is of Roger's 1912 IHC Autowagon with wood for my friend Ted's 65hp Case steam engine shown here on the belt. Gary ;)

post-5643-1204838104_thumb.jpg

PS: I just got an email from my friend Roger, stating he ONLY did the mechanical restorations. The bodywork and paintings shown were by others. Judging from that air cooled engine running in the previous post, that looks very top notch Roger!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My friend Roger is shown in a 1910 Highwheeler IHC in snow. He (authentically) wrapped the rear wheels with rope and said they were known to go just about anywhere they wanted to in deep snow. His son Andy is in the seat with him, circa 1980.

Gary , that pic of the rope wrapped wheels sure brings back memories. My brothers and I used to use the same technique on our bicycles in the winter time only we used baler twine. It really added to traction. Just a little farm kid's inventive ideas. :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Gary

I'm putting together a video of Mount pleasant line of steam engines on parade and some of them I can't

identify. Maybe you or someone can help me out here. I'll post the pics here .

John

I would like to know size & year if possible.

post-86-1204846206_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gary , that pic of the rope wrapped wheels sure brings back memories. My brothers and I used to use the same technique on our bicycles in the winter time only we used baler twine. It really added to traction. Just a little farm kid's inventive ideas. :P

So Ralph,

I suppose you are next going to tell us you also used clothes pins and playing cards to simulate a "motor" on your bicycle? Actually, they sounded pretty good?!!! And... Where could you buy baler twine in the winter time?

Gary ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gary , that pic of the rope wrapped wheels sure brings back memories. My brothers and I used to use the same technique on our bicycles in the winter time only we used baler twine. It really added to traction. Just a little farm kid's inventive ideas. :P

So Ralph,

I suppose you are next going to tell us you also used clothes pins and playing cards to simulate a "motor" on your bicycle? Actually, they sounded pretty good?!!! And... Where could you buy baler twine in the winter time?

Gary ;)

Playing cards,,,,? Gary, if we had been fortunate enough to own a deck of playing cards we sure wouldn't have used them for that purpose. :D

Actually I think we used my Dad's cigarette packages as they were about the right gauge of thickness to give longevity and an ear pleasing sound.

Re: baler twine, we had an endless supply. The milk cows liked their baled hay and every bale had two twines to be cut off and hung up on a hook in the barn for future use. That was back in the days of sisal twine too, the kind that actually would bio-degrade. Not like today's plastic that lasts almost forever.

Just getting back to the subject we were on a couple of days ago,,, here is a poster showing some of the advertising used to bring people from the northern states up the Soo line to Canada to harvest.. "40,000 men needed to harvest 100 million bushels of grain. One way ticket for $12..

post-90-1204852938_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

O.B.G.&loadstar: I enjoyed your comments on the steep sidehills. We putup silage with a another local large farmer and I have heard the comment "if it's too steep for pasture they'll silage it".Not for the faint hearted with air ride trucks. We shure learn about different suspensions .

john r,

If you notice between the two steam engines, there is a haystack. A friend wanted to try out a New Holland Bale Wagon one year and they were over the night before, and saw bales up there. He brought it over and after he started around the upper side, and as he gained higher weight, he lost his traction to the uphill drive wheels. He bought it anyway, but never ever offered to come back to stack hay in that field again.

Gary

OK When we last were able to gather the older kids for a family vacation, we went to Glacier National Park and detoured to Mehmke's to see what we could. This thread has been like taking another vacation. This has been one of the greatest collection of stories and pictures that I've ever seen in book form or on the internet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Gary

I'm putting together a video of Mount pleasant line of steam engines on parade and some of them I can't

identify. Maybe you or someone can help me out here. I'll post the pics here .

John

I would like to know size & year if possible.

post-86-1204846206_thumb.jpg

Hello John,

I'm glad to help out in whatever way I can. This is a 60hp Case and I'd have to know the serial number to know the year. They continued building this early style right almost to the end of production in (?) 1924. It was a tried and tested, proven model that worked and worked well. There was very little change from 1910 to the end of production of the 60hp. Actually, among Case engines, this one from 1898, as a 20hp through 1909 when it would become the 60hp in 1910, to the end, probably had fewer changes than any other Case steam engine built, other than maybe the old 25hp and its successor, the 75hp.

How'd I do Colin?

Ralph,

That was a great poster you posted there. And, I was yanking your chain about the baler twine. I remember back in the sisal twine days of my youth on the farm. The old IH A-120 4X4's box would get quite full in the winter. A couple of times Dad would start a burning barrel fire and feed baler twine into it, just to get rid of it. A cousin rolled over his old Chevy pickup one year and there was twine scattered all over the ditch of the county road. Later, he quipped, "I rolled it over to clean the baler twine out of the box... This is the cleanest that box has been in years." Of coures he took a big hammer to what little bending went on with that old heavy tin cab and she went on for more years. I'm not so sure he even broke any glass, as it was quite snowy in the ditch. Likely the most damage was to the right rear view mirror? And... I was never much of a card player, so I guess I figured they should have at least one good use?

realevergreen,

I'm glad you enjoy this menagerie of stuff. I love Glacier Park and even better now that I have my "senior citizen's pass." And if you met Carl Mehmke, as some do, he is one of the finest people I've ever met. He has considerable old iron, doesn't he

Gary ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gary, Ralph

realevergreen's post regarding a vacation brings to mind something I have been mean to mention. I would sure be nice to have a list of all the places and people mentioned on this thread. Just the farm and frontier museums of Montana and Canada would be a starting place.

Where could some like this be stored and easily available? Tim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

timnjaneb,

I've never gone online and checked for Canadian museums. The Western Development Museums are many, but I'm no help finding them. Ralph, do you have a listing? I know Saskatoon and North Battleford, Saskatchewan are big ones and I know about a museum in Austin, MB. Maybe John and Ray can help? The

Mehmke museum is about 12 miles east of Great Falls, Montana on US Highway 89.

Of course John posted the 60hp Case steam engine at the Mount Pleasant, Iowa Old Settler's Museum and Labor Day Weekend show annually is the grand-daddy for number of engines.

National Threshers Association each year in June is the oldest show, at near 65years running.

Gary ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

timnjaneb,

I've never gone online and checked for Canadian museums. The Western Development Museums are many, but I'm no help finding them. Ralph, do you have a listing? I know Saskatoon and North Battleford, Saskatchewan are big ones and I know about a museum in Austin, MB. Maybe John and Ray can help?

Gary ;)

Besides the ones Gary mentioned I have no official list, just a few names come to mind. Closest to me is the Yorkton Theshermens show every August. Its a whole weekend and they tell me its a great show. I am finding out there are more of these farm shows and threshing demos each year so should make a list.

The Motherwell national historic site at Abernethy has several weekend demos , I've only been to the threshing one, usually in September which conflicts with harvest for me.

This year I guess the big one is the IH collectors show held at Moose Jaw, Sask. at the Sukanen Village museum. That museum was well worth a look over ten years ago when I was there and I hear it has grown considerably since then. The IH show is planned there for July 12 and 13th. I've just finished watching the Lacombe show from 07 and it was very impressive. Lots of IH equipment and trucks.

Heres a pic from the Yorkton Threshermens show back about 2000 when my Uncle was there and took a few pictures. Thats a BR John Deere beside him, the big ones in the background I'll need a little help with.

post-90-1204907859_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gary

Can you identify these two.

There is the Elkhorn MB. car musem one of the best in the west, and of cource the Austin MB. threashermens reunion. As well

We have a musem on the farm of about 80 diferent models of McCormick-Deering tractors.

Jack Beamish at Hamiota has a really nice display of Case steam engines & IHC tractors.

Radcliffe Farms at Cardale have a nice collection of tractors of diferent makes.

Just to name some in this area

John

post-86-1204909470_thumb.jpg post-86-1204909521_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ralph,

The first one behind the John Deere is a big gas tractor and I can't ID it. The next is a 20hp Reeves double simple Canadian Special, I can't see enough of the rest.

John,

The first one is a 16-60 Nichols & Shepard. The second is LIKELY a 22hp Advance-Rumely Universal. It could be a 20hp and I'm not sharp enough to know but someone might say it is a 25hp? My gut instinct says likely a 22hp. The 20hp is only different in the cylinder bore. The 25hp is larger, but I don't spend enough time around them to recognize the difference readily. I still say 22hp. There are a bunch of later model Advance/Advance-Rumely Universal engines at Mt. Pleasant. I've ran a 20hp and they are a good, strong engine. I've heard of them rating right in there with the 65hp Case, but I've never compared them myself.

Gary ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gary

Can you identify these two.

There is the Elkhorn MB. car musem one of the best in the west, and of cource the Austin MB. threashermens reunion. As well

We have a musem on the farm of about 80 diferent models of McCormick-Deering tractors.

Jack Beamish at Hamiota has a really nice display of Case steam engines & IHC tractors.

Radcliffe Farms at Cardale have a nice collection of tractors of diferent makes.

Just to name some in this area

John

post-86-1204909470_thumb.jpg post-86-1204909521_thumb.jpg

Guys the best line up of working steamers in ON. is the Blyth threshermans show at Blyth ON. every Sept.

Also the Farm Museum at Milton ON.

Blyth steam lineup

Sawyer Massey gas tractor at Farm Museum

Ray

Link to comment
Share on other sites

John,

I forgot to mention, the two steam engines you posted... The Nichols & Shepard and the Advance-Rumely, are both at least likely circa 1914 engines. They were both the later styles their respective companies produced in the steam era.

Ray,

Those are great pictures you posted. Blyth looks like a great show, as you say. I sure enjoy the mini-DVD you sent me of that show. Talk about an adrenalin rush, I LOVE watching and listening to steam engines plow. Preferably on the rear deck, firing, but at least in person. But the next best is on the TV set in winter. That Sawyer-Massey gas tractor is a great looker. I've seen other pictures of them, but it could be this same one? I don't know how prolific S-M gas tractors were? There were lots of their steam engines produced.

I posted another picture of Roger's 1908 Sears and another 1910 Sears he restored the mechanics of in his garage or shop. You won't likely see two of them together very often. These cars were available through the Sears & Roebuck catalogs.

The second picture is of two IHC Autowagons that Roger was doing the mechanical restoration on for two different gentlemen. The front is a 1909 model and the rear is a 1910 model.

Gary ;)

post-5643-1204914835_thumb.jpg

post-5643-1204914896_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess I should have posted links to the museum sites I mentioned earlier today. The Sukanen Village has a very interesting site with plenty of pictures of past shows and virtual tours of the site.

http://www.sukanenmuseum.ca/

Check out the picture of the home built Baker Fan they have there. I know Gary has discussed the Baker Fan on this thread before .

The Western Development museums have a site with dates and events but not much for pictures...

http://www.wdm.ca/yk.html

Heres another of my Uncle's pictures from the Yorkton show. I have this one marked as a "Geiser Steamer". Do I have it right? :mellow:

post-90-1204940073_thumb.jpg

post-90-1204940790_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess I should have posted links to the museum sites I mentioned earlier today. The Sukanen Village has a very interesting site with plenty of pictures of past shows and virtual tours of the site.

http://www.sukanenmuseum.ca/

Check out the picture of the home built Baker Fan they have there. I know Gary has discussed the Baker Fan on this thread before .

The Western Development museums have a site with dates and events but not much for pictures...

http://www.wdm.ca/yk.html

Heres another of my Uncle's pictures from the Yorkton show. I have this one marked as a "Geiser Steamer". Do I have it right? :mellow:

Ralph,

Yes, You had it right. It is a Geiser-Peerless model Z-Z or 36hp engine. Thanks for the Baker fan picture too!

Gary ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just had to add this pic of a Rumley tractor that I saw in the latest sale catalogue. I doubt you will find another like it. This one is coming up for auction at a farm sale this April. The rest of the sale.........

http://www.farmauctionguide.com/cgi-bin/ho...anum=1197429825

post-90-1205095010_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess I should have posted links to the museum sites I mentioned earlier today. The Sukanen Village has a very interesting site with plenty of pictures of past shows and virtual tours of the site.

http://www.sukanenmuseum.ca/

Check out the picture of the home built Baker Fan they have there. I know Gary has discussed the Baker Fan on this thread before .

The Western Development museums have a site with dates and events but not much for pictures...

http://www.wdm.ca/yk.html

Heres another of my Uncle's pictures from the Yorkton show. I have this one marked as a "Geiser Steamer". Do I have it right? :mellow:

Loadstar/Gary, haven't had anything to add lately, but the Baker fan/Steam tractor pics reminded me of a humorous story I saw unfold a few years ago.

One of the main highlights of late summer for me is to attend the annual American Thresherman's Show at Pinckneyville Ill. every Aug.

49th Annual American Thresherman's Assoc. Show

The events unfolded something like this....

A Friend and I were standing, chatting some distance away from a large old Steamer, belted to a giant squirrel cage type fan.

Directly behind, and facing away from the fan was a row of porta-potties. All were assembled beneath just a huge old Oak tree.

The fireman was busily stoking up the old girl for a run, when about this time a rather time worn, elderly gentleman walked up and entered the "facilities" for a little relief. :(

As you might guess, no more had the door closed, until they started the fan, and what a racket it made as it gained speed, in no time the leaves, acorns, branches rained down on that plastic cube like hail, and almost immediately the door flew open and out stepped the old boy, still in the final stages of closing the fly on those bib overalls. :P

Needless to say, some pretty funny stuff. :P:lol:

At least for us. :lol::lol::lol:

Oh, and as always, a pic

ahmw.jpg

Harrison Machine Works

Belleville, Ill.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Red Ranger,

Who owns that Jumbo steam engine, do you know? I have a friend, Larry, in Indiana who has a couple of them, I believe? I know he has at least one. This one is a late one, but the company built engines before this design. I've only touched one Harrison Jumbo and it was an early style at my late friend, Oscar O. Cooke's Dreamland Museum near Billings, Montana years ago. I put a picture of Oscar's early model below.

Ray,

I'm not very good at Rumely Oilpull models. Is that a 15-30 Model F? Just my "shot in the dark."

Gary

post-5643-1205116987_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I assume you are talking about an A D Baker fan from Canton Ohio ? I'm redoing a Baker gas tractor for a friend this winter. I'm doing an engine update in it as A D liked power!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I assume you are talking about an A D Baker fan from Canton Ohio ? I'm redoing a Baker gas tractor for a friend this winter. I'm doing an engine update in it as A D liked power!

Rusty Farmer,

Yes, they are all one in the same. A. D. Baker, Swanton, Ohio. He developed the fan as a means of placing a load on his engines at the factory for testing and adjusting.

Gary ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...