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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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Wow, that is one sharp shot of the 110 loaded on the lowboy. Someone was really thinking when they set that pic up. Thanks OBG!

I was not up at Rantoul when they were plowing that year. I really dont remember what was going on, but it must have been important as I am only 40 miles away...

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Hi Gary

Great pic of thoughs 110s coming towards the camera,

Just wondering if you where at the Case Expo at Rollag in 1992. They had 7 110s at that show.

Here is a pic of them plowing. I put together a video of that show and the 6 110s plowing, we sold a lot of them on VHS and now we have them on DVD as I guess VHS is a thing of the past. I captured these off the video. I had to be a long ways back to get them all in . There was 6 110 case plowing at once

pulling 68 plows.

John

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Ralph,

Each 110hp Case had to pull 20-bottoms. The hitch took some engineering to build. The smoke is that tan color when the coal is sitting and burning without being drawn through the boiler. I don't know why it emits a different color then, but it does. Then as they start to turn over and the fire (smoke) is drawn through the tubes in the boiler, things start to change. Notice Warren's middle engine still has a trace of tan above, but mostly black below. Tuttle's at right is starting to put out some pretty good black, with the tan smoke above that. If you look at Seller's at left, there is just a first puff of black starting to come at the smokestack, with all tan above. Within a 10' pull, they would have all been putting out black smoke as they are in the bottom photo.

Wart ECIL,

I notice your avitar, so I'd think you might like that photo. I'm not sure whose place this is? I've been to Warren's parents place in Waterloo, while he was still single. I've not been to his place in the country. This could well be it, but it could be Holland's place as well. The reason I think it is Warren's place, he had it there for much of the week cleaning the engine up to become a cover girl.

I'm posting the three 110hp Case engines at Rantoul, only in other scenarios... Not there. This is the Ron Holland engine when it was owned by my late friend Kenneth Kelley at Pawnee, Oklahoma. The picture was of the first Case gathering there in the late 1980s. All of these people, four of my friends included, were all 110hp Case owners.

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This next picture is one I took of Graham Seller and his 110hp Case at the 50th NTA in 1994 at Wauseon, Ohio. I'd just finished running the engine that VERY WET year.

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The last picture is of Carl Tuttle's 110hp Case one year on the belt at Pawnee, Oklahoma. His late son Kim is shown at the throttle. Sadly my friend Kim drowned about five or so years ago. Gary ;)

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Hi Gary

Great pic of thoughs 110s coming towards the camera,

Just wondering if you where at the Case Expo at Rollag in 1992. They had 7 110s at that show.

Here is a pic of them plowing. I put together a video of that show and the 6 110s plowing, we sold a lot of them on VHS and now we have them on DVD as I guess VHS is a thing of the past. I captured these off the video. I had to be a long ways back to get them all in . There was 6 110 case plowing at once

pulling 68 plows.

John

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John,

I put on a photo of what I was up to the week before, below. I didn't dare call my boss and say I'd be another week longer... But it did cross my mind! I was staying in Iowa with the Bellingers and they went to Rollag, and really thought I should join them. I've always kind of wished I had. Oh well. They sent me video of the plowing. They had a hard time getting things going, but I guess they eventually did. Don Bradley had fun with that little 30hp Case leading the pack, from what he told me.

Gary ;)

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Heres a not so old pic of an IH payloader at work on my brother's farm in 1987. The area was being converted from overhead power lines to underground, a real improvement in farming country where its a nuisance farming around those poles. I don't know what size the cat pulling the plow was but it still needed help from the IH payloader up front at times.

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Good day all!! This may be a wee bit off topic, but I would presume that you will appreciate the historic value. These pics were taken in Northern Saskatchewan, in the Laloche area, north of Buffalo Narrows. Gotta love it!!

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Good day all!! This may be a wee bit off topic, but I would presume that you will appreciate the historic value. These pics were taken in Norhtern Saskatchewan, in the Laloche area, north of Buffalo Narrows. Gotta love it!!

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Gee kjohn,

Off topic? Thank you for putting it back on topic again! I appreciate your doing that. What brand are the crawlers in the second picture? Allis-Chalmers? Great pictures and thanks for posting them. By the way... What is the "topic" on this thread?

Gary ;)

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Good day all!! This may be a wee bit off topic, but I would presume that you will appreciate the historic value. These pics were taken in Norhtern Saskatchewan, in the Laloche area, north of Buffalo Narrows. Gotta love it!!

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Gee kjohn,

Off topic? Thank you for putting it back on topic again! I appreciate your doing that. What brand are the crawlers in the second picture? Allis-Chalmers? Great pictures and thanks for posting them. By the way... What is the "topic" on this thread?

Gary ;)

Maybe off topic, but with those great pictures of the huge Case steamers I found this working model.

Ray

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Getting back into steam power. Heres a scan of an old calendar photo I dug up here recently. Caption says taken near Qu'appelle in the 1890s. Looks like some late season threshing going on with all the snow and ice. Must have been quite a job running a steam engine in freezing temperatures. Just look at the icicles on that wagon box. I have no idea what type of engine this one is but maybe someone else on here will be able to i.d. it.

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Getting back into steam power. Heres a scan of an old calendar photo I dug up here recently. Caption says taken near Qu'appelle in the 1890s. Looks like some late season threshing going on with all the snow and ice. Must have been quite a job running a steam engine in freezing temperatures. Just look at the icicles on that wagon box. I have no idea what type of engine this one is but maybe someone else on here will be able to i.d. it.

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By the way... What is the "topic" on this thread?

Just so everyone knows, when I stated the line above this line earlier, I was not being facetious. I was saying, "there IS NO TOPIC on this thread." Whatever you bring to the table, that is what it is! That clear, now Ralph... Steaming in the winter creates a whole new set of problems for a steam engine. It is handy heat for the engineer, but the pitchers have to pitch bundles (sheaves) faster to stay warm. I used to be a water boy for a seismograph crew, my first paying job after highschool (other than my military) and at 20 below, it made one wonder what would happen with engine problems, as the truck's exhaust kept what few icesiclkes off of the tank that were kept off. A water tank on skis, as this one in your picture makes me feel sorry for the water boy. He had to hand pump that water, very likely. If this engine had a "wet bottom" firebox, which it didn't, since it is a return flue, they (wet bottoms) were known to freeze solid, even though inside the boiler. I'm sure the farmer's livelihood was at stake, getting in a crop for income or feed, whichever, so it had to be imperitive they got it threshed. The cold, such as this didn't hurt the threshing quality much. Dad stated from doing this, that the cold kept the snow going through a thresher just like dust, not moisture. I don't know the brand of that old return flue portable engine, but it is cute and I'd sure find shed space for it in my shed! Thanks for posting it Ralph!

Gary ;)

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Wil,

I'm anxious for you to get a scanner. They open up a whole new world for those ancient family pictures. I'm glad you and Ralph liked the engine pictures.

Well, no scanner yet. I spent most of the week digging out from a blizzard last Sunday/Monday and than trying to stay warm. Monday afternoon it took me 40 minutes to go over to my Mom's who lives 6 miles away. Had to find the right path that the snow plow truck had been down. Mom had knee replacement surgery a couple of weeks ago so I have been over there quite a bit helping out and keeping the snow cleared out so the physical therapist and home help nurse could get in and out.

Gary, great steam engine pictures.

Everyone has posted great pictures like usual.

I can not imagine trying to hand pump and than haul water when it is as cold out as it has been but our ancestors didn't thing anything of it. I guess you had to do it just to survive.

Well after a week of nasty weather, Saturday and today gave us a reprieve and reminded us that winter can be very beautiful and just in time for another 3 to 4 inches of snow tomorrow :blink: Here are some pictures I took Saturday morning of the frost in the trees. Mother nature can be so beautiful at times.

Wil

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Ralph,

I know I've had these winter threshing pictures here before, but never in a block together as this.

This first one is a Big Forty Gaar Scott on the farm my cousins now own over in the Judith Basin. The engineer, Ed Daugherty, put a tarp over the canopy and water tank to hold some more heat in the fireman's area, circa 1912.

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This second picture is of a Minneapolis steamer that had been threshing in the snow. I don't know why it got moved out of the belted position, but it did. This picture is courtesy of my good friend Carl Mehmke near Great Falls, Montana.

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This last picture is of that threshing machine (Aultman-Taylor??) on skis in North Dakota, near Medora.

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Wil,

You weren't there when I hit "add reply" but you were afterward! Thanks for the winter scenes. It just makes me happy I've never had to experience winter threshing. I've always gotten to do it for fun in the fall, when it is supposed to be done. Dad told of threshing on Thanksgiving day, going home for a feast, then returning to the field to thresh, with plenty of snow and cold. I remember his saying, "They wanted to take my shovel away from me, so they could be on the engine. Dad said, "to he11 with you, you didn't try to take it away from me in July, when it was hotter than blazes, I'm not giving it up today."

Gary ;)

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[now Ralph... Steaming in the winter creates a whole new set of problems for a steam engine. It is handy heat for the engineer, but the pitchers have to pitch bundles (sheaves) faster to stay warm. A water tank on skis, as this one in your picture makes me feel sorry for the water boy. He had to hand pump that water, very likely. !

Gary ;)

Wil, nice hoar frost pictures. We have not had as much of that as usual this year. The old saying is that we will have precip 90 days after we see the hoarfrost.

Gary, those are some cold looking threshing pictures alright. I'd guess they'd have to keep a fire in the engine overnight just so it didn't freeze up. And the guy hauling water likely had to chop ice on the slough to get any water. I'd think winter would take most of the fun out of threshing.

Combining might be the same. Seen it happen once or twice here (not to me) where guys had a field of sunflowers or something to combine after it snowed. LIke you said, it worked better when colder as otherwise the snow would melt enough to freeze onto the sieves and eventually plug them.

I notice you refer to the tank being on "skis". Here those were always called sleighs or "runners". It was a yearly ritual changing over from wheels to sleighs in the fall and back again in spring. Made it kind of tricky going to town in the spring when there was still snow most of the way but maybe bare ground nearer to town. I've still got an old set of sleighs stored in an old log barn here.

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Funny Loadstar I always heard rain 6 months later, we had a ton of heavy hoar frost late Dec, early Jan so that first cut of hay should prove trying to get off............I'll see if I can remember when it comes time, doing ok so far.

Reading a bit about the winter threshing, I have a well and cistern but use the cistern for the house with hauled water, once it gets down to -25 it's no fun hauling water anymore :( our circumstances today don't seem as dire as those in the pics, I guess what a lot of these pics show is the true pioneering spirit, adversity was just another skill, as tough times as much of it was I'm sure most had great memories of those days. :)

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, I have a well and cistern but use the cistern for the house with hauled water, once it gets down to -25 it's no fun hauling water anymore :( our circumstances today don't seem as dire as those in the pics, I guess what a lot of these pics show is the true pioneering spirit, adversity was just another skill, as tough times as much of it was I'm sure most had great memories of those days. :)

We sure do have it easy re: water on the farm now. My Dad used to talk of how he or his Dad had to haul water from the creek about 3 miles south of here in the winter. In the thirties most of the shallow wells went dry and the cattle needed water. They had a wooden tank , not sure how many gallons but I doubt it was more than a hundred or so. All the water was dipped by hand to fill the tank. Haul it home behind the horses and dump the water in a dry well in the yard. As the weather got colder the tank would get heavier as ice built up inside it. I don't know how they would melt it out of a wooden tank. And the irony is that all those years of hauling they were walking and driving over an ample supply of water just 40 feet below the surface not far from the house.

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Hardtail & Ralph,

I'm posting this photo again, of my Case on Christmas day of 1982. If you'll notice the trees around there that day, I didn't realize they were rated X or exhibiting any behavior as you describe? That must be another of our words, describing our frost, that get changed at the border 65 miles north of me?

Gary ;)

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Hardtail & Ralph,

I'm posting this photo again, of my Case on Christmas day of 1982. If you'll notice the trees around there that day, I didn't realize they were rated X or exhibiting any behavior as you describe? That must be another of our words, describing our frost, that get changed at the border 65 miles north of me?

Gary ;)

:D Gary, I guess one might misunderstand the word in conversation but I'm pretty sure I got the spelling right. :rolleyes:

Heres a pic for you to look at when you get home. Another calendar page showing a seeding operation near Rosetown, Sask. At first I thought it was a mistake as I could only see the plow. They I spotted the crowfoot packers and the end of a drill seed box at the far right. It looks like they are plowing and seeding in one operation. Not sure if this is prairie being broken or last year's stubble.

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I am also wondering about the four letter word?

And Gary speaking of words I need more of your explainationsl Last week I was watching a JD program on RFD and they used the word palouse. You have used it a number of times on this tread and I would like a definition. To compound the issue you also refer to a freind by the name of Palouse?

Tim

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All this talk about hauling water prompted me to post these pics.

Back in the 1930s and 40s we had running water to water the cattle, only trouble was we had to herd the cattle to the water every day, it was 3/4 mile across an open field to get to the river, this is the Assiniboine river and it flows quite fast over a shale bar in the river, with very little ice, mostly open water. The cattle would go right in the water and drink even in the coldest of weather. We would take the cow herd here every day to water, and also a tank to haul water back to water the animals that we didn't take. Like milk cows and calves. Early in the winter we would use a truck to hual the water tank, then switch to a team and sleigh when the snow got to deep for the truck. We used a small pail on the end of a D handled fork, dipped it in the water and dumped it into the tank, sure was oneway to keep warm. After having dug many wells at the farm site we finally struck a good supply of water, which was a welcome event for us.

John

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All this talk about hauling water prompted me to post these pics.

Back in the 1930s and 40s we had running water to water the cattle, only trouble was we had to herd the cattle to the water every dayWe used a small pail on the end of a D handled fork, dipped it in the water and dumped it into the tank, sure was oneway to keep warm. After having dug many wells at the farm site we finally struck a good supply of water, which was a welcome event for us.

John

John, your cattle watering pictures look familiar, or at least similar to my memories of watering cattle at the dugout. Of course at this time of year there was no such thing as open water and nobody went to the dugout without an axe to chop through the ice that had frozen over since yesterday. As winter went on and ice thickened it got to be a long way down to the water. Your "pitchfork dipper" sounds just like the one I used. Usually a 3 tine fork with an old pail wired onto the tines. This was used to pail water into a metal trough made out of two halves of a 25 gallon barrel welded together. It could get pretty hectic when the herd was really thirsty or in a hurry to get back to the yard.

Another method, one that I never was into, was melting snow for the cattle to drink. They had a "snow melter" , not sure if it was a home made or bought item but it used a wood fire to melt the snow that you shovelled into it. Lots of work and it must have seemed like a long winter facing that job day after day. It makes me really appreciate being able to flip the handle on a hyrant and watch the water flow from the well in the yard now.

I don't have a winter scene but this is the dugout with the cattle drinking in the summer (late fall).

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Heres a pic for you to look at when you get home. Another calendar page showing a seeding operation near Rosetown, Sask. At first I thought it was a mistake as I could only see the plow. They I spotted the crowfoot packers and the end of a drill seed box at the far right. It looks like they are plowing and seeding in one operation. Not sure if this is prairie being broken or last year's stubble.

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hi, i like that picture of the big Rumely. you never see too many pictures of them. looks like its pulling 10 or 12 bottoms. theres not too many 36-120s left. theres one at Rolalg Mn. and another way down in North Carolina that run. theres another at Dalton Mn and WDM Saskatoon that haven't ran for awhile, and another in Iowa thats not restored. and i think theres one in California too.

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I am also wondering about the four letter word?

Tim

Hi Tim,,, Gary,, heres a shot of my "calendar girl" from late 2005. Took me a while to find an appropriate caption for it but eventually found it.

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hi, i like that picture of the big Rumely. you never see too many pictures of them. looks like its pulling 10 or 12 bottoms. theres not too many 36-120s left. theres one at Rolalg Mn. and another way down in North Carolina that run. theres another at Dalton Mn and WDM Saskatoon that haven't ran for awhile, and another in Iowa thats not restored. and i think theres one in California too.

Colin,, I had no idea what brand of engine this one was. I'm not too good at identifying the different makes and models (unless the name is painted on them) :lol: Looks like they were using straw for fuel.

Heres a link to an interesting auction sale in South Sask. this April. Looks to be quite a collection of rusty iron besides the more modern stuff. Including a WD9.

http://www.switzerauction.ca/S_Apr_17/S_Apr_17.htm

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Guys,

I've been under the weather with a nasty sore throat and it feels like I have a workhorse standing in the middle of my lower back. It was good to see all of the activity in my absence. Probably the brightest spot was of that 36hp Rumely STRAWBURNER plowing and seeding. Then that brought out another bright spot. My young friend Colin from Hamimota! He is in his younger 20s and is THE sharpest person I've ever ran into regarding the J.I. Case steam engines. I've known his dad was sharp for years, but I kind of wonder if the kid didn't pass dad up? Hopefully, Colin will come on and post some of his steam pictures. They have an excellent collection of Case steam engines up to and including the 110hp Case. Maybe he'd start with that picture of the 110hp Case pulling 18 bottoms? Just as good after the steam pictures would be to post some of your IHC pictures Colin? I know you have a pretty good collection of them as well.

timnjaneb,

"Palouse" is a river in Washington state. The hills formed from the formation of this river left some most formidable hills. The Palouse Hills are the steepest hills I know of on the north American continent that are farmed. They have deep topsoil deposited on them so they raise grain like gangbusters. My (our) friend lives there and farmed it. If you go back to the first few pages of this thread, he posted many pictures of McCormick-Deering TracTracTors farming those hills and the combines that harvested them.

MB John,

Anytime I see cows like that I think back to when we used to have to break ice for them in the winter on Beaver Creek. It was hard work at 30 below 0, but we were lucky to have the running water for them.

Ralph, thanks for posting that website of the tractors and the auction. I always enjoy seeing a picture of another WD-9, but I was also fascinated with the "wheatland" style 1030 Case. I know we discussed this earlier in this thread, but I don't want to go back and look for it. I put two pictures on of mine, the first showing my son Mike as a grade school boy, greasing and going to the field for the day. The third picture is the one from that sale ad. This was the style that littered the Judith Basin in their era. The one I had was the only one of that style, with the adjustable front axle forward of the radiator, as opposed to this one with the axle behind the radiator. Oh... and thanks for that calendar page showing the frost too, Ralph! You had the spelling correct!

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Guys,

I've been under the weather with a nasty sore throat and it feels like I have a workhorse standing in the middle of my lower back. It was good to see all of the activity in my absence. Probably the brightest spot was of that 36hp Rumely STRAWBURNER plowing and seeding. Then that brought out another bright spot. My young friend Colin from Hamimota! Ralph, thanks for posting that website of the tractors and the auction. I always enjoy seeing a picture of another WD-9, but I was also fascinated with the "wheatland" style 1030 Case. .

Gary, hope you will be getting over the worst of it and into recovery mode by now. So you know Colin. I remember him from a few years ago on the forum but haven't seen any postings from him in quite a while.

Your right, I do recall your 1030 pictures and I sure like that one at the sale. Of course the wheatland style is the only kind I've ever seen here except for one 930, general purpose I think they called them. It had the front axle set out front and the little narrow fenders on the rear wheels. If that one at the sale was a 930 I might be interested in it. Sure reminds me of one of my favourite all time tractors and now I've just got to post a picture of it. A friend was doing some disking for me with his 4020 and heavy duty 14 foot disk. We wanted to see if the 930 would handle it with half as much traction and ten less horsepower. I can't recall what gear I used but the 930 did not too bad until it spun out. Conditions were far from ideal as it was a wet fall morning with the surface a bit greasy from rain and frost.

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A little bit of data on those 930's and 1030's. Contrary to popular belief, the 1030 and 930 8 sp. model designations were something like this: 932 and 1032 - short wheelbase; 931 and 1031 long wheelbase. To confuse it even further, both the 31's and the 32's had a serial number split that specified certain non-interchangeable front end parts. When I had my salvage yard, it was like pulling teeth trying to obtain the tractor serial number from the customer, so we could at least stand a chance of sending the right parts. Quite often we would be given the engine serial number. :huh::huh:

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