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Old Binder Guy

IH Tractors on Montana Farm

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Hi Gary

Merry christmas to you and all the rest that have followed this long and winding thread.

Not sure if I have posted this picture already but I came across it in an unrelated search of my files and I know theres a few on here that appreciate looking at a good 660. I took this a few years ago at a local dealers lot. Unusual headlight arrangement on this particular tractor.

Theres a few of the pull type axial flows in the background. 14 or 1682 I believe. You'd probably need a least a pair of 660s to power one of those combines. :mellow:

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Ralph,

It is good to hear from you as well. Talk about long "winded", huh? This thread is it and you've been the most faithful poster, so it is good to hear from you. I'll have to wait until I get home from work tonight, as I'm just getting a "red X", but I always anxiously await your photos and posts. And as a former 660 owner, I'll always smile when viewing another one. And... If I've already seen it, I likely won't remember anyway, so it will be like a new picture to me. (I can hide my own Easter eggs as well!)

I hope you had a Merry Christmas. Mine was very nice.

Speaking of not remembering, Have I posted this picture of a neat little original 1906 Cadillac photographed at Pendroy, Montana, by my good friend Dick Tombrink, EDGE&TA Director at Large. Dick lives near Worden, Montana, east of Billings.

Gary ;)

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Hi Gary

Merry christmas to you and all the rest that have followed this long and winding thread.

Not sure if I have posted this picture already but I came across it in an unrelated search of my files and I know theres a few on here that appreciate looking at a good 660. I took this a few years ago at a local dealers lot. Unusual headlight arrangement on this particular tractor.

Theres a few of the pull type axial flows in the background. 14 or 1682 I believe. You'd probably need a least a pair of 660s to power one of those combines. :mellow:

2569989790032927439S600x600Q85.jpg

Ralph,

It is good to hear from you as well. Talk about long "winded", huh? This thread is it and you've been the most faithful poster, so it is good to hear from you. I'll have to wait until I get home from work tonight, as I'm just getting a "red X", but I always anxiously await your photos and posts. And as a former 660 owner, I'll always smile when viewing another one. And... If I've already seen it, I likely won't remember anyway, so it will be like a new picture to me. (I can hide my own Easter eggs as well!)

I hope you had a Merry Christmas. Mine was very nice.

Speaking of not remembering, Have I posted this picture of a neat little original 1906 Cadillac photographed at Pendroy, Montana, by my good friend Dick Tombrink, EDGE&TA Director at Large. Dick lives near Worden, Montana, east of Billings.

Gary ;)

Am reminded of the 1908 Buick, owned by the Obermeyer family near here bought new by grandpa and always in the family. It is undergoing a complete restoration and was told it is already at twice projected budget. Hoping they get it done and show it locally on it's 100th anniversery. One of the boys that lives in California has a 07 and a 09 in running order.

picture of same, has been on here before, follows.

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I scanned this picture this noon that my wife took of me a while back, when I first saw "my new Farmall" F-12 at Mike's shed near Helena. I was concerned the reflection from my head might make the photo too light, but her old 35mm cheapie camera did okay. Every time we buy film, the girls warn us, "They will discontinue making 35mm film sometime in the future."

I am anxious to haul the Farmall to my shop here in Kalispell next spring and actually get to play with it. I've wanted a Farmall on steel for quite a few years and just hadn't made it happen yet. I have an F-14 with steel on the rear, but it has a single pneumatic tire on the front, which actually my other F-14 came from the factory with as well.

I'm putting a picture a friend at Helena sent me he'd taken at the Lewistown, Montana show this past fall. My good friend David Vanek Jr. owns the 30hp Advance cross compound steam engine, a sole survivor of that classification, belted to their sawmill. It looks like the Farmall B and the LA or LB McCormick-Deering engine have a job to do as well.

The last picture is one I may have already put here. I had a few MBs left so put it on. It is homesteaders in eastern Montana, likely showing off some of their prized livestock on their "free land" homestead.

chub,

I love that 1908 Buick photo and I wouldn't care if you put it on here once a week! I didn't notice it being here until after I hit "add."

I wanted to put these pictures here as well. I think I may have put this picture here of my 1935 TD-40 (yes it should be gray) when I placed it where I was building a pole shed for it about 18 years ago. Notice my uncle Audie added the oil and temperature gauges up through the hood. It was a "user" to him, not a "collector."

The next picture is of a 1915 Model T at the 2005 Rollag, Minnesota show. It should have been painted black as that was the only color Henry used at that time, but it is still a great looking old car. I love any of them.

Gary ;)

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Gary, nice lot of photos here. I like the pic of the old homesteaders with their livestock. Very familiar and could easily have been taken in Sask. at that time. Since we are into old cars today, here is one I have from the centennial (1967) parade in Lipton , Sask. I'm guessing its about a 1932 Chev? Check out the "new" cars parked along the street. I bet the owner of that green 57 Chev never dreamed his car would be a classic collector car some day.

The old Harry Jampolsky general store in the background dates back to the town's beginning. Its long gone now.

P.S. I too have to wear a hat to avoid reflection into the camera lens. :D

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The next picture is of a 1915 Model T at the 2005 Rollag, Minnesota show. It should have been painted black as that was the only color Henry used at that time, but it is still a great looking old car. I love any of them.

Gary ;)

Gary, You and Ralph are great at getting a fellow to remember some old pictures to post,

My dad was a Ford dealer inthe 20,s in our town, this is a picture of his Garage.

Here,s a scan of a Ford sales catalog I found in my house over 40 years ago when I was renovating.

I will post some more later

Ray

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The next picture is of a 1915 Model T at the 2005 Rollag, Minnesota show. It should have been painted black as that was the only color Henry used at that time, but it is still a great looking old car. I love any of them.

Gary ;)

Gary, You and Ralph are great at getting a fellow to remember some old pictures to post,

My dad was a Ford dealer inthe 20,s in our town, this is a picture of his Garage.

Here,s a scan of a Ford sales catalog I found in my house over 40 years ago when I was renovating.

I will post some more later

Ray

Ray,

How great that your father was the Ford Dealer! My imagination runs wild thinking of what those old dealerships were like in the Model T & Model A era. Thanks so much for posting the pictures!

And before I forget, I got mail from you today, but I think I'm going to have to get someone else to help open it, as I only have seen one other Mini CD, and it was the master my accordion CD was recorded on. I'll get someone through the school or one of my coffee buddies to open it and I'll get the info, I assure you! That was very thoughtful of you. Again, I may not know what the heck I'm talking about anyway.

I'm putting a few of my favorite Ford pictures on, so you can reminisce some more about your father's Ford Agency, Ray!

The first picture is of a 1926 San Francisco Automobile Show. Notice there are other manufacturers displaying behind these Model Ts up front. There is one of each body style there with the (near) Model T's; L-R: Roadster, Tudor Sedan, Coupe, Fordor Sedan and last but not least the Touring Car.

The second picture is one taken at Moore, Montana when there was a crowd at the depot meeting the "Jawbone" Milwaukee RR passenger train. To the left of that buggy is what I think may have been one of the first 2500 Model T Ford Touring Cars built. It has all of the earmarks of that run, but I can't see the driver's area to see if it has two levers and two pedals. After circa 2500 they dropped the water pump and used only one lever and three pedals. I think the world of the late Floyd Clymer and the boundless history he posessed, but I have a Floyd Clymer Book on Model T Fords and he stated in it that the early two levers and two pedals "...used the second lever for 'low gear'" but that is in error. Low, neutral and high were always on the left pedal and the right pedal was always the stopping brake, while the main lever was the parking brake, but the second lever on those early ones was "Reverse."

The third picture is of Henry Ford's personal 1918 Model T Coupe. He used it for a considerable number of years. He could have driven a new Model T each day, but this was his automobile of choice. It has several updates that weren't available in 1918, when it originally rolled off of the assembly line. One was an electrical system with self starter (introduced in 1919) and these wire wheels with 4.40X21" tires weren't offered until late 1926. The nickel plated grill was a one of a kind, at least to this old guy who has followed the Model T Ford VERY closely for 54 years. I took this photo when it lived at the Montana Territorial Prison at Deer Lodge, Montana, in the Towe Collection.

This last photo is one I've had forever, almost, from an ancient publication that shows a 1903 Model A Ford (the original Model A version) parked near a Best 110hp steam engine pulling a Best combined harvester in California. It noted "C.L. Best" as being the man standing beside his Model A and "chauffer."

Speaking of chauffer... I was talking to a friend in the medical community. Model T Fords were notorious for breaking the wrists of their owner/operators. The timer was cantankerous and had to be set with a gauge. If it wasn't it put the timing off and if it was premature, it kicked backwards and if you were pushing down on the crank at "3:O'clock" when it kicked, it would often break the wrist in what the medical community still refers to as "the chauffer's break". Forgetting to put the "spark lever" up did the same thing. You had to pull upwards, from 6:00 to 12:00 o'clock, and then just using your fingers, with your thumb on the back side of the crank handle, parallel to your hand. Clear?? Me neither.

Gary ;)

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Gary, if you have a later CD player there is a spot in the center of the tray for the mini CDs.

Before Henry Ford got the assembly line in Windsor ON the model T,s were shipped to dealers in a crate by rail and assembled sometimes right at the train station.

Do you think this was JD Humm,s first truck?

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Ray,

Did you capture the apprehension in my last post about playing this CD? Dang... I sure hate displaying my stupidity for the world to see, first hand, when it comes to computers. But, we didn't grow up with them and I'd wondered as there was that little dip in my computer's CD tray.

Well...... My tray has an indentation that the Mini-CD fits down into, but my computer won't recognize there's a disk in it, so I'll take it to work with me in the morning and I'll see if something newer there can do it. I just think I don't have enough bells and whistles on my old "steam powered" computer. I placed a picture of it below.

I'm thinking that is the 1925 Model T Pickup, judging from the windshield used, that can be converted to a roadster with turtle deck if desired. That 1925 Model T Pickup is listed in one of my several Model T books as the "worlds first factory built 'pickup'."

Gary ;)

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Back to the Overmeyer Buick on page 258. They have said that red was the only color for that years Buick as black was for the model T.

PS Wonder how long it would take to start at the front and read this whole thread?!!!

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Back to the Overmeyer Buick on page 258. They have said that red was the only color for that years Buick as black was for the model T.

PS Wonder how long it would take to start at the front and read this whole thread?!!!

Chub,

I'd believe you about Buick red. Some Model Ts were red up until 1913, then it all went black for Henry. Cleanup and multitudes of paint colors slowed down the assembly line. With everything black, it simplified much of that. That is until 1926, when Henry had to start offering colors as few people really desired a Model T anyway and everyone else had sliding gear automobiles with colors and other accesories. Edsel had a heck of a time convincing his dad he needed to really update the Model T, since Henry didn't want to stop building them. He blamed the dealer's salesmen for not being able to sell his black Model Ts circa 1924-25.

I'm getting ready for bed, Chub. Will you leave another post here for me in the morning, telling me how long it takes to read everything? I will accept your word for however long you say it takes! I will say, I might be curious about the "odometer" in the morning!

Gary ;)

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WOW! 100,000 views. What an accomplishment. Here's to another year & another 100,000 views.

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IH RD,

I didn't know Art Anderson and I'd never been to his museum in Minnesota, but I almost bought a steam engine he owned, or at least I was "dickering" on it. It is 16hp Reeves Highwheeler #7904. They built a couple of dozen of them or more. This engine is one of three known to remain. They made the 16hp Reeves Highwheeler steam engine, using the rear drivers of the 25-50 Reeves gas tractor, shown in the second picture, with none other than Marshall Truman Reeves himself at the rear of the driver wheel. The Reeves gas engines were somewhat slow sellers, so head mechanical engineer Harry C. Clay utilized some of the contracted 90" driver wheels, from an over produced stock in their warehouse, to build his Highwheeler steam engines. This was during the Emerson-Brantingham time period and likely 1916. Reeves also built a larger 40-65 Gas tractor that used 96" rear driver wheels. Harry C. Clay also built a 20hp Reeves Highwheeler utilizing the 40-65 gas tractor driver wheels and my dad had one of them. Just over a dozen of them were built and none survived, to my knowledge. Ours was wrecked in 1948 and another was wrecked in Minnesota on election day in 1947.

Now as far as that 40-140hp Rumely, if it truly was a 40-140hp, that engine rated right at the top of the steam engine horsepower size category on the North American continent. Most of the Rumely engines of that size were actually 36-120hp and counting the flues in the boiler would be about the only accurate way of knowing for sure which it really was, as they were identical engines otherwise. I don't know what else Art Anderson owned for steam engines, but now we have two!

Gary ;)

Hi OBG!

I'm trying to find Art Anderson's "Sale Of The Century" auction book. I can't find it yet, but I did stumble onto some other "goodies" :wub: . I know I have it around here someplace. It was a real neat book with lots of pics. I plan on posting some on here whenever I do find it. He had literaly hundreds of tractors and thousands of antiques. I believe it was a 5 day sale.

Are you saying this 40-140 was actually a 36-120? I know it was badged 40-140. I remember them saying at the auction that it was 2 left of 7 built.(I think,-that was a long time ago :wacko: )

Me thinks he had 10 steamers at the auction. You have 2 of his?

See ya,

IH RD :)

PS. Congrats on 100K!!!!!!

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WooHoo! 259 pages, 2586 posts, 100,017 views. Thats a record!

Just to celebrate and in the spirit of "keeping it up".

Viagra quip contest... The top ten were:

10. Viagra, Whaazzzz up!

9. Viagra, The quicker pecker upper.

8. Viagra, Like a rock!

7. Viagra, When it absolutely, positively has to be there overnight.

6. Viagra, Be all that you can be.

5. Viagra, Reach out and touch someone.

4. Viagra, Strong enough for a man, but made for a woman.

3. Viagra, home of the whopper!

2. Viagra, We bring good things to Life!

And the unanimous number one slogan:

1. This is your penis. This is your penis on drugs...

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Gary, Me no read, just procrastonate [sp.]!!!

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CRS,

How fitting you'd be the one to report this while this westerner slept. I probably should have had your handle, but it was already taken!

IH Red,

No... I wasn't saying it was a 36-120, I was saying they were all alike except for the number of flues used and MOST 36-120 owners call theirs 40-140s and even paint it on the water tanks. Art's could well be a 40-140. I was just issuing a blanket caution, but it sounds like they knew, as they listed it as one of two and that is very likely correct. (Whew... dancing ths sidestep is tiring!) I put a picture on of another "real" 40-140 Rumely I photographed at Osage, Iowa in mid August this year. So, they DID make them. I'll accept that Arts was also a true 40.

I ran into a couple of other pictures I had to put here since I found them looking. The first is little Charles Colwell sitting on his dad's 32hp Reeves cross compound Canadian Special near Ross Fork (of the Judith River) over in "the Basin." Charles has long grown up and passed away about 25 years ago of old age. The history time clock just keeps running?

AND... in honor of this occasion, I just had to place the picture here again of Dad and his brothers plowing with their 32hp cc CS Reeves, about 7 or 8 miles from the Colwell place. I remember Dad telling me how they plowed a measured 400 acres with this outfit. They moved in Monday morning and finished Friday mid-afternoon. Not too bad, considering they were still living in the horse age.

Chub,

I don't blame you for procrastinating. I sure as the heck was. I need my beauty sleep, even if it fails to produce.

M Diesel,

You're talking over my head, but I know from watching a few TV commercials... If it was four hours... I'd call my coffee buddies and brag to them, not call my doctor.

You ALL have a great day!

Gary

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Hi OBG!

I'm trying to find Art Anderson's "Sale Of The Century" auction book. I can't find it yet, but I did stumble onto some other "goodies" :wub: . I know I have it around here someplace. It was a real neat book with lots of pics. I plan on posting some on here whenever I do find it. He had literaly hundreds of tractors and thousands of antiques. I believe it was a 5 day sale.

Are you saying this 40-140 was actually a 36-120? I know it was badged 40-140. I remember them saying at the auction that it was 2 left of 7 built.(I think,-that was a long time ago :wacko: )

Me thinks he had 10 steamers at the auction. You have 2 of his?

See ya,

IH RD :)

PS. Congrats on 100K!!!!!!

IH RD, We now have "two of his pictures!" I only wish I had the engines! The late Clarence B. Black purchased the Reeves 16hp Highwheeler at Art's auction and I was dickering with Clarence. The engine had some problems and he wasn't ready to sell either.

The best one lives in Indiana and belongs to another friend, Don Atzinger. I put a picture of Don's 16hp Reeves Highwheeler on below.

I also put a picture of the 36-120hp Rumely I took at Rollag in 2005 on the Prony brake. This engine is identical to Art's other than it lacks two tubes, I believe. There could be another measurement in the length of the smokebox that differs. Other than that, they will exchange part for part and bolt for bolt. The obvious difference in actuality was the usage of a higher steam pressure to atain that extra 20 brake and four nominal horsepower in the 40-140. Geiser Peerless did a similar thing with their Z-Z and Z-3 engines. The Z-Z was 36-110 and the Z-3 was 40-120.

Gary ;)

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Gary, You and Ralph are great at getting a fellow to remember some old pictures to post,

My dad was a Ford dealer inthe 20,s in our town, this is a picture of his Garage.

Here,s a scan of a Ford sales catalog I found in my house over 40 years ago when I was renovating

Ray

Ray, that Ford catalogue is a real prize you have. I'm fortunate too as I have a Ford "Fast moving Parts " catalogue from 1949 that covers right back to 1929 I think.

I've also got a great pic of a couple of Model T Fords outside a Ford dealership here. Not sure but I might have already posted this one a whle back though. :huh:

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Gary, You and Ralph are great at getting a fellow to remember some old pictures to post,

My dad was a Ford dealer inthe 20,s in our town, this is a picture of his Garage.

Here,s a scan of a Ford sales catalog I found in my house over 40 years ago when I was renovating

Ray

Ray, that Ford catalogue is a real prize you have. I'm fortunate too as I have a Ford "Fast moving Parts " catalogue from 1949 that covers right back to 1929 I think.

I've also got a great pic of a couple of Model T Fords outside a Ford dealership here. Not sure but I might have already posted this one a whle back though. :huh:

Ralph,

I remember those Ford Dealership pictures... Please post them again. They were fantastic, and I sure as heck don't want to go back through this mess, looking for them!

I just posted this picture of a Russell tandem compound steam engine at Nevada City, Montana about 30 years ago, back when I had hair on top of my head! In an Afro, no less.

Gary ;)

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Ray,

This first one isn't Ford, but it is International Harvester... a 1907 IHC Autobuggy highwheeler.

This next picture came to me in an e-mail and was likely from an eastern European area? It didn't say, but this concept isn't new.

This third picture was taken in the Great Depression at the Dover's homestead near Buffalo, Montana. The engine had "hailed out" of this 1926-27 Model T Coupe and the ladies were going to Ladies Aid, regardless. Old Dobin made sure they got there. I'm quite sure this WAS NOT the first Ford Mustang? :rolleyes:

Ray, Your father likely had just what they needed (but maybe couldn't afford at that time) to make that Model T run like new again.

I think I made my 1926 Coupe look a little better than when I got it 54 years ago.

Gary ;)

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Some more Ford Model T stuff for you Ray.

This first one is of a 1913 Model T here in Whitefish, where I work, and we just replaced the school in the background over the past three years, with a new one.

The second picture is of a neat looking 1910 Model T Touring Car.

The third picture was taken in front of Milbank Motors in South Dakota in 1910.

The last picture was taken in Kalispell, where I live, showing a nice old 1913 Model T Touring Car and the proud family posing with it.

Gary ;)

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This first picture is of a 110hp Case steam engine threshing in North Dakota, has a support vehicle built by Henry Ford there to help out. That is a later "black radiator" Model T.

The second is a picture taken at the Jessup, Montana flour mill, showing a 1910 or 11 Model T Touring Car.

The third one is a picture of Steve Anderson's house moving outfit moving a house near Roy, Montana. The steamer is a Z-3 Geiser-Peerless and the Model T Touring Car is circa 1912.

The fourth picture is a lousy one, but shows an old Model T with carbide headlights and a brass radiator in an old log "shop" building on the farm I grew up on. I've gone back and looked several times. Not only is the Model T gone, but the building is gone too.

The last picture is one of a Judith Bottling Works - Model TT, circa 1918-22, in a parade in Lewistown, Montana where I was born. As a matter of fact, the brick building at right is Dr. Attix's clinic and he delivered me.

Gary ;)

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This third picture was taken in the Great Depression at the Dover's homestead near Buffalo, Montana. The engine had "hailed out" of this 1926-27 Model T Coupe and the ladies were going to Ladies Aid, regardless. Old Dobin made sure they got there. I'm quite sure this WAS NOT the first Ford Mustang? :rolleyes:

Gary, In canada they called them the Bennett (sp) buggies after the then Prime Minister.

Dad wasn,t married when he had the Ford dealership, he gave it up when the A,s came out and kept busy just repairing all makes.

when he grew tired of people not having money to pay repairs in the 30,s he bought a farm and got married.

He said The Ford block man would pay him to scrap older T,s so they would not be resold and compeat with the model A.

He had a 1927 oldsmobile, that was the first car I remember.

Ray

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To OBG, and all other contributors to this great thread, many thanks for the time and trouble to provide us with this entertainment/information.

I think the amount of views and replies speaks for itself. Though this is my first post to it, I have more than my fair share of "views".

Not that there's any shortage of material here but, I came across this site the other day and thought some of the "steamheads" might enjoy it.

http://www.bseps.org.uk/scf2k5/scf2k5_shmans.htm

It's for the Bedford Steam Engine Preservation Society in the UK

There are loads of great pics of restored Steam Equipment including Agricultural Traction Engines, Road Rollers, Steam powered wagons, and some beautiful "Showmen's" Engines.

Sample pic, Fowler Showman Steam Crane....

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Here is a few pics of 110 case at the Rollog Case Expo. in 1994 ,where they had 7- 110s on display & in the parade, and the plowing pics show 6 110s and a 65. They where pulling 72 plows. I put together a 1 hr. video of this show of Case steam engines and plowing and just recently put it on DVD. These pics are taken off the video, just one frame for each pic, there is some quality loss doing this, but you can still get an idea of the show.

John

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John,

Here,s a couple more from the Blyth Steam show.

Road Roller

Sawyer Massey in the background

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