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Old Binder Guy

IH Tractors on Montana Farm

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I got this Christmas card from my good friend Randy Schwerin of Sumner, Iowa. I got to see him at Osage when we went there to run the big 40hp Reeves this past August. Randy engineered that engine for about a dozen years when it was at Cedar Falls, Iowa. I met him there in 1992, the first time he let me run it.

Ordinarily, I'd be tickled pink seeing him once a year, but this year he was on his way to Oregon to a big auction sale. He and my friend John Schrock stopped by Kalispell for the night and we had breakfast at Syke's. (I just had to mention Syke's in Kalispell, as they are likely one of few places on earth that still offer an unlimited cup of ten cent coffee!)

Anyway, this picture shows Randy and Hector with Randy's 25hp Gaar-Scott rear mounted engine, also a "Montana Special."

Gary ;)

Gary, since we are now into steamers here,s the line up at the Blyth show in 2005.

Also a Champion Grader made in Goderich ON.

664 CDN,

You know something... The beauty of this thread is that we have done what we all darn well wanted to post here and it doesn't seem to matter too much to the onlookers? If you have something else to share of interest, share it! I don't care. I look at this thread as a lesson in history and I appreciate each and every one of you contributors, as well as the onlookers, for making this thread last so long. I love history and you don't have to resort back to covered wagons (I love them too!) to find history. We're placing it out there and it makes me happy. Please keep posting.

Now while it makes me happy, here... if "Mama" aint happy, aint nobody happy" but she is quite tollerant of me any my web stuff. I don't go to bars or porn sites... and I've never answered one of those coded Viagra e-mails I get regularly either. Nor have I answered that young lady's e-mail who wants to send me some pictures of herself. As long as I stick to historical machinery, I'll be okay, so keep posting!

Now, before I get to ranting some more and forget, I sure appreciate your posting those steam engines for me. It makes me want to go build a warming fire, get out a hose, fill with water, start a fire in the firebox and do some steaming!

I appreciate your grader pictures as well. I remember a neighbor who had a Caterpillar road grader that had a small (pony?) gas motor on it for lifting, tilting, etc. and we borrowed it, pulled it with the TD-18, to straighten out the surface of a road we had over Beaver Creek Hill. The picture of Mike Tyler and me on our old 20-70 Nichols & Shepard in 1956, shows that road up the hillside in the distance.

Gary ;)

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Here we have pics of a snowplane built for a Dr. , was used mostly to go ice fishing. It has a 150h.p contiental aircraft engine, not to bad on gas, about 4 gal per hr. lots of power, would carry 4 people, would go in any snow condition, good for about 50-60 m.p.h. wide stance made it very stable. Props where especialy made by a fellow in WPG. MB for pusher prop apllication, notice wide blade right out to the tip. props where metal faced to stop gouging, ice, snow, gravel stones.

John

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Here we have pics of a snowplane built for a Dr. , was used mostly to go ice fishing. It has a 150h.p contiental aircraft engine, not to bad on gas, about 4 gal per hr. lots of power, would carry 4 people, would go in any snow condition, good for about 50-60 m.p.h. wide stance made it very stable. Props where especialy made by a fellow in WPG. MB for pusher prop apllication, notice wide blade right out to the tip. props where metal faced to stop gouging, ice, snow, gravel stones.

John

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John, thats a great looking snow plane.

The one I posted of our Dr. also had a wide prop, the picture was taken before I was born and appears to have a 4 or 6cyl engine covered with some sort of hood and driving the prop with Vbelts.

When I was about 6 or 7 he was at our house ( my sister was sick) and he gave us the grand tour before he left.

It had a flat head V8 Ford engine and I think was direct drive off the fly wheel so he must have repowered it.

His relatives owned a foundry and built it for him, they made farm machinery including threshing machines.

He wrecked it one day going too fast out of town, after that he had and early snowmobile he called a Motor Toboggan it had a belt track with wooden slats.

Gary, heres a couple more pictures from Blyth.

Ray

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MBcat, great shots of the snowplanes. I posted a link a while back to a brochure for the Fudge snowplanes. I expect there are a few left here in Sask. in the museums but I think I was born too late to see them in service. I always wondered how those narrow skis would do in deep snow. Might be ok on a packed surface but hard to overcome inertia in deep snow with just a propeller pushing. Also I've done enough snowmobiling to know just how rough the fields can get after a hard wind blows the snow into drifts.

Getting back to the graders here is one that sold at a local auction in fall of 06. It was a "pull start" Cat. The strting engine hadn't worked in a while and they regularly started it by pulling. It was a cool October day and a little ether was required but it fired up amidst prodigious quantities of smoke. It also had no working brakes which made it interesting for both drivers. :o

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Ray,

That Sawyer-Massey looks like a great steam engine. I have several pals in Canada who own them and they are very highly thought of. Of course, those of us down here know to relate the name Massey with Harris and Ferguson, in a later time period.

Ralph,

I always love seeing more grader pictures. I'll never forget one winter when the county road grader was plowing snow and got the right front wheel over the edge of a tall embankment and it set there high centered on the main blade. It took some doing, but I got the old TD-18A started and went up, put a chain on it and we got her back on the road.

I went by the junkyard again yesterday. They haven't touched the HD-16, but they have dismantled and cut up a bunch of that old 3-cylinder Caterpillar road grader. I sure hate to see history go that way.

The steamer below is a Huber at Overton, Nebraska threshing, from my late friend Tom Stebritz of Algona, Iowa.

Gary ;)

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The steamer below is a Huber at Overton, Nebraska threshing, from my late friend Tom Stebritz of Algona, Iowa.

Gary ;)

Gary, it took a while to find the pictures but here,s a couple more from Blyth 2005 show.

Erie steam shovel found in the US and restored by a group of fellows in Teeswater ON

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664 CDN,

Thanks for the pictures. I love old steam shovel pictures. I couldn't find the ones I wanted here.

With the snowmobile talk of recent, I put this picture of a steamer here for your enjoyment.

Gary ;)

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664 CDN,

Thanks for the pictures. I love old steam shovel pictures. I couldn't find the ones I wanted here.

With the snowmobile talk of recent, I put this picture of a steamer here for your enjoyment.

Gary ;)

Now theres an interesting machine Gary,. What is it's purpose? For cutting blocks of ice maybe? :rolleyes:

Heres one I found of a "bombardier".

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664 CDN,

Thanks for the pictures. I love old steam shovel pictures. I couldn't find the ones I wanted here.

With the snowmobile talk of recent, I put this picture of a steamer here for your enjoyment.

Gary ;)

Now theres an interesting machine Gary,. What is it's purpose? For cutting blocks of ice maybe? :rolleyes:

Heres one I found of a "bombardier".

They used to cut ice blocks on the mill pond in our town, at least once a team of horses was pulled into the water when the sleigh slid off the ice, fortunately they didn,t drown.

The boys at Teeswater did a great restoration on that old Erie shovel.

Looks like they could put front wheels on the Bombardier for the summer.

Here,s a Ruggles truck, only one I have ever seen.

Ray

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[

Looks like they could put front wheels on the Bombardier for the summer.

Here,s a Ruggles truck, only one I have ever seen.

Ray

Ray, I think if they put wheels on that Bombardier it would look a bit like the army half tracks of WWII. Nice looking"Ruggles" truck. Is it the same as a Rugby? I've never heard of the Ruggles but did see a Rugby many years ago. Around 1930 vintage at a guess.

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[

Looks like they could put front wheels on the Bombardier for the summer.

Here,s a Ruggles truck, only one I have ever seen.

Ray

Ray, I think if they put wheels on that Bombardier it would look a bit like the army half tracks of WWII. Nice looking"Ruggles" truck. Is it the same as a Rugby? I've never heard of the Ruggles but did see a Rugby many years ago. Around 1930 vintage at a guess.

Ralph,

I don't think I'd want to be around a steam boiler under operating pressure, on ice? Let alone trying to saw ice with that "saw blade."

That was a neat looking Bombardier. I'd forgotten they built the enclosed units like that. The first I remember seeing were the small snowmobiles, with the headlight fastened atop the cowl.

Ray, I've never seen nor heard of a Ruggles. Was it manufactured in Canada? I'd sure find space for it in my shed!

I put a picture on taken atop Main Street hill in Lewistown, Montana, where I was born, taken ca 1918. I don't know the brand of that touring car? It may be a Dodge? The Judith Mountains are in the background. That hill was sure a scary thing to lose control of sliding down with black ice underfoot! That house at the upper right spent nearly 90 years as the center of Montana being in the kitchen sink drain. Global positioning has put it about 12 miles west of there, however.

I will be gone from here until Wednesday, so I'd sure like to wish each a very Merry Christmas!

Gary ;)

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Here is a steam threashing pic.

John

John, those are some interesting pictures I have never seen that type of feeder on a thresher before, where they have a conveyor feeding from both sides. All I have ever seen is a couple of hay racks pulled up on either side of the thresher with two guys pitching sheaves in to the separator from either side. This is a first for me. Not that I am any authority on threshers. :rolleyes:

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wow!! I have heard of those double feeders and seen pictures of them from the steam era, but I have never seen recent photo's of one. That is awsome. Thanks John.

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I too wondered how they feed into the treashers from stacks!! Question answered!! Thanks, chub.

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I too wondered how they feed into the treashers from stacks!! Question answered!! Thanks, chub.

There was a western feeder on some threshers that reached almost to the ground.

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Hard to tell from the pictures but I presume the feeders swing in an arc on the thresher? Chub.

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These feeders will lower to the ground as the stack goes down, they also swing about a 50º arc and is controled by the men on the stack.

John

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These feeders will lower to the ground as the stack goes down, they also swing about a 50º arc and is controled by the men on the stack.

John

Bring it back to the top.

Here,s a International 1026 I came across on Sat.

# 42 of 59 built which includes any industrials.

Has 7xx hrs on the tach (second time around) and a round baler monitor in the cab.

Looks well used but still going strong.

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Hello OBG & Everyone,

I haven't been on this thread in a while and wow you can spend a couple hours easy playin' catch-up :lol:

Waiting for the kid to go to sleep so I can play "santy clause" :ph34r: .

Anyhoo...This was in our local farm paper a few weeks back. They have a 20, 30, 50 year and so on history page & this was in it and it brought back memories, so I cut it out & took a pic of it. Since I know there's steamer experts here B) , what do you know of this one? This Art Anderson had a complete auction sale in the early 80's & this tractor brought, if memory serves me, $100,000.00, it was VERY clean & run like a new one. They claim it was always inside & up on blocking and I believed it. I'm curious if anyone else has seen it, or one like it. I'm guessing it's got to be one of the biggest steam traction engines of it's day.

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Note: He paid $20G's for it & a few years later it brought $100! Pretty good profit for back in them days!

I wonder what that engine would bring today? :wacko:

PS. I know I have his old sales brochure around here. It was an actual book! You couldn't believe all the stuff this guy had!

Merry CHRISTmas!

IH RD :)

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Only 541 more views and this one breaks 100,000! This has been a real nice thread. Glad it is still going. :D This thread walked off and left the previous number one record holder a long, long time ago. This has been a forum inside a forum and very enjoyable reading.

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Running late on checking in for Christmas---------but Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to everybody.

edit: bout to forget----but Gary (from California) on the ACME (CAT board) has a terrific 1890 threshing photo that I hope he brings over for comment.

Delta Dirt

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Hey... I'm really proud of you guys! I expected to have to hunt for this thread in the basement under some things. It was on page two! You guys really are something to be proud of.

John,

First of all I sure liked the pictures of the wing feeders and the Huber return flue, stack threshing. I've only gotten to stack thresh once and we had two stacks close to the thresher. Those wing feeders would have been great. These are kind of rectangular troughs, it appears. My friend has one that has radial sides and I think (?) it is a "Garden City" [KS] brand, but I'm not sharp enough to know.

IH RD,

I didn't know Art Anderson and I'd never been to his museum in Minnesota, but I almost bought a steam engine he owned, or at least I was "dickering" on it. It is 16hp Reeves Highwheeler #7904. They built a couple of dozen of them or more. This engine is one of three known to remain. They made the 16hp Reeves Highwheeler steam engine, using the rear drivers of the 25-50 Reeves gas tractor, shown in the second picture, with none other than Marshall Truman Reeves himself at the rear of the driver wheel. The Reeves gas engines were somewhat slow sellers, so head mechanical engineer Harry C. Clay utilized some of the contracted 90" driver wheels, from an over produced stock in their warehouse, to build his Highwheeler steam engines. This was during the Emerson-Brantingham time period and likely 1916. Reeves also built a larger 40-65 Gas tractor that used 96" rear driver wheels. Harry C. Clay also built a 20hp Reeves Highwheeler utilizing the 40-65 gas tractor driver wheels and my dad had one of them. Just over a dozen of them were built and none survived, to my knowledge. Ours was wrecked in 1948 and another was wrecked in Minnesota on election day in 1947.

Now as far as that 40-140hp Rumely, if it truly was a 40-140hp, that engine rated right at the top of the steam engine horsepower size category on the North American continent. Most of the Rumely engines of that size were actually 36-120hp and counting the flues in the boiler would be about the only accurate way of knowing for sure which it really was, as they were identical engines otherwise. I don't know what else Art Anderson owned for steam engines, but now we have two!

Gary ;)

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Hi Gary

Merry christmas to you and all the rest that have followed this long and winding thread.

Not sure if I have posted this picture already but I came across it in an unrelated search of my files and I know theres a few on here that appreciate looking at a good 660. I took this a few years ago at a local dealers lot. Unusual headlight arrangement on this particular tractor.

Theres a few of the pull type axial flows in the background. 14 or 1682 I believe. You'd probably need a least a pair of 660s to power one of those combines. :mellow:

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