Old Binder Guy

IH Tractors on Montana Farm

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14 hours ago, George 2 said:

During WWII the US military were dismayed at the number of parts and different systems for naming them that they had to stock to keep the war machine going.

And this is from the organization, (I use the term loosely), that has a 13 digit part numbering system. (Or at least it was when I retired), known as the FSN, or federal stock number..

That system was so organized that the FSN number for a railroad locomotive could well be found between two TOTALLY un-related items. Say, paper clips and drinking straws, for instance.

I did look it up once, and I forget what the two adjacent items were, but they both would have been ordered far more than locomotives. 

:wacko:

Mike

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Thanks for that schooling on parts numbers mikem. "I ordered a box of paper clips and received a steam locomotive!" The old partsman at Bourke Motor when I was a boy was Alvin E. Lewis. He was good with remembering parts numbers. He was always kind to me. I was very young and was killing time at Bourke's waiting for my ride home. I fell in love with a very tiny ball pein hammer they had in their tool bin assortment. There were pliers, tape measures, wrenches, etc. But I loved that hammer. I asked if I could charge it to my dad? Alvin did that. I never caught heck for doing that. I have it hanging on the wall of Mike's shop with a tag, stating that it was my first new tool.

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And there was a "house cleaning" of old obsolete parts at Bourke Motor when I was about 12 or 13. The stuff for 15-30 McCormick-Deering tractors and Regulars, etc. was being pulled from parts and hauled to their warehouse to gather more dust. There were two paper tube, pull apart containers that Alvin brought out and GAVE to me, as he knew I had a use for them. They were two brand new brass & glass drip oilers, that were in the parts bins for Model M 1-1/2 hp IHC and McCormick-Deering gas engines. They proudly hail atop Mike and Randy's 20 hp Reeves today. A matched pair for the crossheads.

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Now, mikem, I almost forgot... Alvin E. Lewis. He ordered something like a box of sickle sections (I don't remember what?) and a few weeks later, a semi pulled up to Bourke Motor with a stripped header for a 181 IH combine to be unloaded. I wasn't privy to the butt chewing Alvin must have gotten from one of the Bourke brothers. Obviously he was one number off on the parts he'd ordered.

This is our Red Power friend Tubacase47 or Tom Railsback of Great Falls, Montana. He came to visit me at Silver Creek a few years back, at the shop. He'd just bought another tuba. I think he has around a dozen of them. I collect tools. Tom collects tractors and tubas! And since I played a double B flat Sousaphone in high school, I kind of understand what may circulate in Tom's head, regarding tubas. 

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Well, I found this on Facebook this morning and couldn't resist posting it. I'm not picking on you, alone, Tom. I'm picking on both of us!  Gary🙂

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  • Haha 2

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about 20 years ago i ran into our old ih parts man (from the corpus christi tx, store)  at the temple tx show he claimed he could recite all the more common numbers for farmall regulars, so we quizzed him and sure enough he recited all the numbers, of course we had a  regular nearby to  check, they were correct. years before he retired, he gave me a very nice operators manual for a regular. his name was Joe Rube. a likeable  guy.

 

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I've got a couple of old Regular manuals I bought off of e-bay a number of years ago.  One has a parts list and illustrations in it.  Times were much simpler back then.

These books are definitely authentic------with faded yellow paper------and the aged  smell/odor of 80+ yrs.  Need to pull it out and post a picture while we are on the subject.

*******

Looking at those tubas---------looks like a tuba might have all of the base ingredients for making a helluva steam or air whustle????  What do you think TubaCase??🎵🔊🤔

Sure should be large enough.

 

DD

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Don't know if I ever posted this or not.

Picture of the old Avon, Ms  38723 post office building (complete with the Confederate flag flying).  

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Picture was taken in 1984------after a new modern brick post office had been built.  My family owned the lot and close friends owned the building----their grandmother had been the post mistress here for years.  They were getting ready to move the building.  So---we capitalized on the moment.  The site is now vacant.

The picture frame was made by another neighbor from a cypress plank off of one of our old tenant cabins-------dates back to the late 1800's.

Wish I had some wood working talents.

 

DD

 

 

 

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That old Post Office pic is really neat!!  The USPS must've had some kind of "standard" for PO's of that era.  Here is a pic of the old PO in Old Glory, Texas. (about 50 miles north of Abilene) The building look s almost identical to the one you posted. The new PO is across the road from this one.

 

 

old glory, texas.JPG

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TwoStep------

Reckon the buildings had to meet  some sort of Postal Service standards-------but over this way,  you would find them in most any kind of building.  Lots in the old country stores.

This little building had once been the local cafe-------known as the "The Hitching Post".

In approx 1946------my mother drove up to the cafe in my dad's pickup.  Her foot slipped off the clutch------and knocked the little building off it's blocks.  My dad took the farm crew up and jacked the building up and set it back on its blocks.

No damage to truck or building-----other than bumping it off the blocks.

All in an everyday happening in rural America at that time.  Nowadays there would have been national TV coverage, government investigations, and 13 lawsuits filed!!!!

edit:  who else has some old post office  building pictures?

 

DD

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6 hours ago, twostepn2001 said:

That old Post Office pic is really neat!!  The USPS must've had some kind of "standard" for PO's of that era.  Here is a pic of the old PO in Old Glory, Texas. (about 50 miles north of Abilene) The building look s almost identical to the one you posted. The new PO is across the road from this one.

 

 

old glory, texas.JPG

That's a new one on me.

Funny how selective the PO is when it decides which ones to close and which ones stay open.

Both Novice, and Talpa have trailer like buildings, but I like the rock/brick buildings like are still in use in Coleman, Brownwood, and the Post Office/Federal Courts Building in Abilene.

Rockwood has a building similar to that in your picture.

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On 7/12/2018 at 9:32 PM, Delta Dirt said:

I've got a couple of old Regular manuals I bought off of e-bay a number of years ago.  One has a parts list and illustrations in it.  Times were much simpler back then.

These books are definitely authentic------with faded yellow paper------and the aged  smell/odor of 80+ yrs.  Need to pull it out and post a picture while we are on the subject.

*******

Looking at those tubas---------looks like a tuba might have all of the base ingredients for making a helluva steam or air whustle????  What do you think TubaCase??🎵🔊🤔

Sure should be large enough.

 

DD

It seems that up until the mid-1940's or so, John Deere implement manuals were combination operators/parts manuals.

I have several from my Dad's equipment, including one for a JD 226 corn picker, which is marked "Our first new corn picker-1941"

Couple of Furrow's from the 40's and 50's sent to **** Brothers Inc.

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Not post offices--------but the famous horse Wrangler's barn.  (old two room tenant cabin converted to barn)

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Cypress cabin dates back in to late 1800's-----floor joices were hand hewn.

My Mama couldn't knock this one off the blocks-------I cut the floor out and set it on heavy creosote treated bridge timbers.

 

DD

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We had the pleasure of an out of state couple who came by to pick up my two rusty 1937 M-H Challenger tractors.  He is restoring his dad's Challenger and will be utilizing these two for parts.

Original plans were to load them on a flatbed.  Unfavorable flatbed rates and unknown pick up times changed the plans.

He and his wife decided to make a trip out of it by flying in and renting a Penske box van-------if I saw away to skid them into the van.  Being an old Marine (plus a friend of Gary and Roger)-------I stated nothing was impossible (just might take a little extra time)!!!

That's when I stuck both feet in my mouth.😲

He checked out the tie down bars inside the van------we figured we could anchor my block and tackle (pulley block) to the front of the van and load a tractor onto my flat tilt bed "watermelon truck" and reverse the cable pull with the pulley block and winch the tractors into the the van------after I had constructed a skid for both tractors since they were on bare and rusty rims and the brakes were frozen.  Did not want to scar/damage floor of rental truck

I went to work pulling scrap iron from my inventory and constructing a saddle skid.  The saddles came from an old poly spray tank saddle.  No problem in skidding the tractors onto my tilt bed.  Backed my truck up to a perfect match with the rear of the rental van.

Then attempted the reverse pull from front of van.  After several attempts of re-rigging our anchor mounts on front of van (pulling from 6 points) but flexing the entire front wall of the van-------I moved anchor point to rear steel frame of van and was able to reverse winch the tractor rear wheels into the rear of the van.  Then pushed tractor further forward with my neighbor's backhoe front loader bucket.  On the second tractor-------another neighbor brought his Bobcat (with forks across) and was a big help finishing skidding the second tractor into the van.

Where there is a will------there is away.  We got them loaded.

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Uhhhh-------did I mention the July heat in Mississippi???😨

Lot more work than planned------but still an interesting and worthwhile project in the name of saving "rusty scrap iron"!!!!   I am getting too old for these games.😩😁

And--------learned that the frame and skin on these damm vans is just no more than a weatherproof cover.  Live and learn------if I can live another 75 yrs------- should be a wise old owl.  (but not yet!!!)

 

Delta Dirt    Avon  Ms  38723

 

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I am hoping Gary reads the above post before he goes for his surgery-------but sure hope he doesn't hurt himself laughing.

Good side of that story.  I met two really nice people (man and wife)-------and he worked just as hard as I did.  But both of our tongues were dragging the ground.

******

Question:

Should I hold Gary and Roger responsible for creating an undue guilt complex for saving old rusty tractors------ resulting in me ending up with both feet in my mouth???

They make it look so easy.

🤔🤤😁

 

DD

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Hopefully they bought all involved supper (at a minimum) after all the work you put into getting their tractors loaded.

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Lol sounds like some of my past misadventures Anson. Glad to see someone will be able to get sum good out of the old girls tho and bring his family treasure back to life in the process. Much better than seeing em go to scrap imo.

Next time might be better to negotiate buyer to do all loading tho. 😄😎

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Art-----that's a great idea on Gary and Roger at least buying supper!!!😁

******

And------if you are gonna be in the business of "putting your foot in your mouth"-------it's good to keep a good stock of old rusty scrap iron in inventory for those special projects like these skids.

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A few sticks of welding rod mixed with a little imagination (and alot of sweat from the Mississippi summer heat)-------and the skids worked fine (just had to have an anchor point to pull from).😨

The angle iron used here came from the old Towner disc that I scrapped out sometime recently.

******

Iowaboy-------what next time???😵😁

 

DD

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Lol well maybe i put my foot in my mouth! Wouldnt be the first time!

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2 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

And------if you are gonna be in the business of "putting your foot in your mouth"-------it's good to keep a good stock of old rusty scrap iron in inventory for those special projects like these skids.

Sure would've been handy if you had kept some of them old early cotton module skids....lol   Could've winched both tractors onto one then shoved it all in that rent truck. Used to see those skids just about everywhere around here but l guess like lts of other stuff they been hauled to the scrap yard.

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Haven't seen one of those old module skids in years either TwoStep-----don't even have a picture of one.

I do remember seeing a couple of sheds constructed out of them.  Funny how fast they disappeared.

******

I passed the link to my "tractor loading post" along to my son in Sugarland, Tx.  He now works with Schlumberger------but previously had been in off shore seismic explorations.

Reb saw your earlier post showing the Old Glory, Tx post office and said in his off shore days that he used to work with several boys from Old Glory.

 

DD

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Let's not forget that the ol' Professor is going into the hospital (blacksmith shop ??) for surgery early Tues morning (24th).

Best of luck to Gary------let us hear from you whenever you feel back up to it.

 

Delta Dirt    Avon Ms   38723

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Best wishes for a speedy recovery Gary.

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Still keeping you in my thoughts and prayers Gary. Speedy recovery!

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Same here Gary. Hoping everything goes well for you.

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I'm guessing that everyone on Gary's thread has him (and Sharon) in their thoughts and prayers for what he has to go through this next couple of weeks.

Anson, you know the old saying with us hard core restoration guys . . . "If it casts a shadow, it can be restored".

I saw a shirt like this on a guy at our thrashing show this weekend . . . Anson knows watermelons, maybe he wears one of them too??

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  • Haha 2

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Quote from Roger:  "If it casts a shadow--------it can be restored"

That's what I am thinking about for Gary.

Hoping that Gary carried some of his blacksmithing tools along with him------I don't know what size blacksmith shops they might have out in Seattle.  But probably not as well equipped as around Silver Creek, Montana!!!

******

Gotta swipe the yellow shirt picture to my files.

 

DD

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5 hours ago, Roger Byrne said:

"If it casts a shadow, it can be restored".

That's a heck of a saying...lol   Kinda funny though, about a year ago my son went to look at a '61 Ford Starliner for possible restoration. l asked him how it looked and he said "Really bad Pop. lt has so many rust holes in it that it don't even cast a shadow."

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