Old Binder Guy

IH Tractors on Montana Farm

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Gary, you are correct about White, it is the same company that produced White trucks and, eventually, White tractors through their subsidiary White Farm Equipment.

Thank you Ben... Sometimes I wonder about myself and often lose track of things. I sometimes wonder if I'll be able to keep this thread going, being leather strapped into a bed at the state hospital at Warm Springs? I may have to give it up. Gary :o

Don't feel bad, I had to look it up to refresh my memory!

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Ben... That makes me feel better!

Nothing new here. I'm heading to Silver Creek soon. I wanted to post this postcard photo and hope that maybe Greg will weigh in as to what all is happening here. Or anyone else who knows what is going on. It is a very unusual threshing scene to me. They must be feeding loose grain from headers and barges to the threshing machine and I do see the sacked and stacked grain there. I know I've posted other pictures of similar equipment, but it sure wasn't the normal way of doing it in the Judith Basin. Gary ;)

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Gary,

Nothing in that picture I am familiar with. My guess is about the same as yours. Doesn't look like anything in this area. Interesting though. Appears to be some sort of dragline arrangement to deliver sheaves of grain to thresher. One thing that seems more apparent...dinner must be about ready, judging from the cook and chimney at the cook shack.

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Only 21 more replies after mine and 2.1 pages to hit 12,000 posts and 1200 pages.

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Gary,

Nothing in that picture I am familiar with. My guess is about the same as yours. Doesn't look like anything in this area. Interesting though. Appears to be some sort of dragline arrangement to deliver sheaves of grain to thresher. One thing that seems more apparent...dinner must be about ready, judging from the cook and chimney at the cook shack.

Greg,

Thanks for giving it a shot. I didn't know if it was bundles (sheaves) or loose (header barge) grain and I'm not losing sleep over it. It's still a very unusual harvest scene. There are two steam engines at work, even if I can't identify what they are doing, other than turning a threshing machine.

Anytime I hear "dinner" (dinner was at noon THEN!) around a threshing season, I think of over eating!

Gary ;)

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A couple more of the postcards I scanned. This is the huge Holt steam engine pulling grain drills, that was fitted with wide wheels to keep it from sinking and burying itself in river bottom land in California.

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This was a Flour City gas tractor built by Kinnard & Sons of Minneapolis, Minnesota. threshing in Saskatchewan. It is too small to be a 40-70, but is either a 30-50 or 20-35. I'm sure ol' Roger will know as soon as he gets back from playing with steam engines this weekend.

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Have a good weekend. Tubacase47 is monitoring this situation. :)

Gary ;)

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I'm normally not on here on a Saturday. I've been fighting gremlins on Facebook and this computer. I downloaded a program (I don't own stock in the company, and it is free anyway) called Malwarebytes and after a McAfee scan showing no problems and a SuperAntiSpyware scan with three quarantines, I threw them away and scanned with Malwarebytes. That puppy cleaned out a whole closet full of things that have hampered my use on the internet, and here on Red Power as well.

Anyway, after that brief description of why I'm here on Saturday, I took this picture of two little plumber's tools I picked up. The one on the left is likely for removing the sharp edge inside a newly cut pipe? The little triangular tool on the right is sharp all the way around and its corners are rounded, not pointed. Does anyone know what it might be for, in the plumbing field? It's cute and unique anyway, but I like to know what things are, I guess. Gary ;)

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The little pointed trowel almost looks blacksmith made. Gary. Neat tools. My mind kept going to bricklayers and finishing joints. That is not exactly plumbing though. Now I have another idea. Thinking back to the days before plastic pipe, these tools may have been used to finish the melted lead used above the packed in oakum in the joints of cast iron soil pipe. Molten lead would flow smooth and not need finishing. Maybe to clean off overflow or spillage? Just a feeble minded guess. Someone will know for sure.

Charlie

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Old Binder Guy,

Have you heard of the memorabilia auction of Teddy Blue Abbott and Grandville Stuart in Lewistown on Nov. 3 ? The wife and I will be there trying t.o secure some family history!

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Old Binder Guy,

Have you heard of the memorabilia auction of Teddy Blue Abbott and Grandville Stuart in Lewistown on Nov. 3 ? The wife and I will be there trying t.o secure some family history!

Scrapper,

I hadn't heard and likely won't be there. I hope you get some neat, neat family history! You deserve it.

Gary ;)

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The little pointed trowel almost looks blacksmith made. Gary. Neat tools. My mind kept going to bricklayers and finishing joints. That is not exactly plumbing though. Now I have another idea. Thinking back to the days before plastic pipe, these tools may have been used to finish the melted lead used above the packed in oakum in the joints of cast iron soil pipe. Molten lead would flow smooth and not need finishing. Maybe to clean off overflow or spillage? Just a feeble minded guess. Someone will know for sure.

Charlie

Charlie,

Your last idea was my first idea, in my thoughts. I was hoping someone could give a definitive answer, but I think we may be onto something, Charlie!

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I know nothing tonight, so here's an encore photo, and an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm. My old 4568 IH 4X4 and the #55 IH Chisel Plow on the old homestead at Beaver Creek. Of course my favorite pickup ever, a 1971 GMC Sierra Grande 4X4 1500.Gary ;)

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I remember studying about Teddy Blue Abbot here in class a couple of years ago.

Can't help on plumbing tools----or plumbing Professor.

Good to see all of that progress being made on Mike's house----looking good.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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I'm normally not on here on a Saturday. I've been fighting gremlins on Facebook and this computer. I downloaded a program (I don't own stock in the company, and it is free anyway) called Malwarebytes and after a McAfee scan showing no problems and a SuperAntiSpyware scan with three quarantines, I threw them away and scanned with Malwarebytes. That puppy cleaned out a whole closet full of things that have hampered my use on the internet, and here on Red Power as well.

Anyway, after that brief description of why I'm here on Saturday, I took this picture of two little plumber's tools I picked up. The one on the left is likely for removing the sharp edge inside a newly cut pipe? The little triangular tool on the right is sharp all the way around and its corners are rounded, not pointed. Does anyone know what it might be for, in the plumbing field? It's cute and unique anyway, but I like to know what things are, I guess. Gary ;)

post-5643-0-69285300-1348941500_thumb.jp

The tool on the right is a shave hook used for sraping paint or finishing moulding and other irregular shapes in wood. Here is another example.

post-64610-0-53944700-1349089925_thumb.j

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I'm normally not on here on a Saturday. I've been fighting gremlins on Facebook and this computer. I downloaded a program (I don't own stock in the company, and it is free anyway) called Malwarebytes and after a McAfee scan showing no problems and a SuperAntiSpyware scan with three quarantines, I threw them away and scanned with Malwarebytes. That puppy cleaned out a whole closet full of things that have hampered my use on the internet, and here on Red Power as well.

Anyway, after that brief description of why I'm here on Saturday, I took this picture of two little plumber's tools I picked up. The one on the left is likely for removing the sharp edge inside a newly cut pipe? The little triangular tool on the right is sharp all the way around and its corners are rounded, not pointed. Does anyone know what it might be for, in the plumbing field? It's cute and unique anyway, but I like to know what things are, I guess. Gary ;)

post-5643-0-69285300-1348941500_thumb.jp

The tool on the right is a shave hook used for sraping paint or finishing moulding and other irregular shapes in wood. Here is another example.

TomH,

While the shapes aren't quite the same, they are similar enough to be the same tool. I'd guess they would be available in several configurations, to match a specific job? I knew it was a scraper. I just didn't know for what.

Gary

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I'm normally not on here on a Saturday. I've been fighting gremlins on Facebook and this computer. I downloaded a program (I don't own stock in the company, and it is free anyway) called Malwarebytes and after a McAfee scan showing no problems and a SuperAntiSpyware scan with three quarantines, I threw them away and scanned with Malwarebytes. That puppy cleaned out a whole closet full of things that have hampered my use on the internet, and here on Red Power as well.

Anyway, after that brief description of why I'm here on Saturday, I took this picture of two little plumber's tools I picked up. The one on the left is likely for removing the sharp edge inside a newly cut pipe? The little triangular tool on the right is sharp all the way around and its corners are rounded, not pointed. Does anyone know what it might be for, in the plumbing field? It's cute and unique anyway, but I like to know what things are, I guess. Gary ;)

post-5643-0-69285300-1348941500_thumb.jp

The tool on the right is a shave hook used for sraping paint or finishing moulding and other irregular shapes in wood. Here is another example.

TomH,

While the shapes aren't quite the same, they are similar enough to be the same tool. I'd guess they would be available in several configurations, to match a specific job? I knew it was a scraper. I just didn't know for what.

Gary

The most common seem to be triangles, ovals and teardrop but I imagine that they may have been custom made for a specific job as you indicate. Tom. Wow page 1200!

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I remember studying about Teddy Blue Abbot here in class a couple of years ago.

Can't help on plumbing tools----or plumbing Professor.

Good to see all of that progress being made on Mike's house----looking good.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

Bought the Billie Blue Abbot book from Amazon...twas cheap and a good read. Already loaned same to friend and it's back. Enjoy sharing a book with someone interested, chub.

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I'd never heard about this World Speed Record before reading it in the Helena Independent Record this past Sunday, 9-30-2012. The record was for five miles and was set with a White steam car, Whistlin' Willy. Gary ;)

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http://helenair.com/...19bb2963f4.html

1907 was also the year that Fred Mariott set a land speed record of 127.XX mph over a measured mile with a Stanley Steamer.

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Likely an encore photo, but I scanned this postcard last week at a very high resolution. It is of a circa 1910 Bozeman, Montana "Joy Ride" with automobiles. I located a couple of Fords. Gary ;)

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Dang showoffs in their fancy automobiles blockin' up the street. The horse and buckboard (middle right side) is getting out of town. A picture of changing times.

Here is an item that no home should be without. This will trim around items in your yard and no one will have to bend over to get the job done.

Grass shear.

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Charlie,

That's a neat grass trimmer. I suppose a guy could make one, but I've never seen a "store bought" one before.

I won't have time to post in the morning, as Wednesday is my early morning and I'll go to Silver Creek afterward. Tubacase47 will have to watch the odometer in my absence. So here's some "just stuff" tonight.

This first one is a postcard of a North Dakota homesteader breaking his property with horses. Wrangler could relate!

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This is a picture of our first fall threshing bee between Columbia Falls and Kalispell, Montana. It was sometime in the later mid-1980s. I was on the Case turning the threshing machine (which is now Mike's) and Sharon's 1953 Ford F-350 is under the spout. That is an IH Truck on a Montana Farm at right. A real neat, clean old IH R-160. That's Cousin Dan Tombrink in the box of it. His brother Dick is at left, behind the engine tender. That's Columbia Mountain in the background; a part of the Rockies.

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The last picture is one of Toot, Mike's 1944 Farmall M, that I took last year when I was watering junipers at Silver Creek. That sure is a pleasurable old Farmall to work with. And this'd be an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm! Gary ;)

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Likely an encore photo, but I scanned this postcard last week at a very high resolution. It is of a circa 1910 Bozeman, Montana "Joy Ride" with automobiles. I located a couple of Fords. Gary ;)

Nice street scene of Bozeman. Here is one of my little village back in the 1920s. I don't own the card (yet) but only have this small image of the original.

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Just stuff again tonight. This picture is an encore, a result from when Mike (Farmall Kid) was deployed in Afghanistan. Our generous, patriotic and thoughtful friend, Roger Byrne, modified the "Model TT" pedal service truck and sent it to Mike's kids. After Mike was home, he posed this photo of Jacob on his IH Farmall Super M and Heather is the "pedal shifter" in that Ford Truck. I wish you could all see the truck up close. It is phenemonal!

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Posed in almost the same spot as the last photo, just a different angle, my nephew Randy is on his Farmall A after he and Mike had just purchased two that a local farmer was selling. Mike's is behind the gate and never got restored. Mike had an opportunity to purchase the IH 300 Utility after this time and Mike traded his Farmall A on the little workhorse tractor that gets used and used at Silver Creek. Randy did an amazing job of restoring his Farmall A. And since he and his wife are childless, there's word on the street that his A will someday live at Silver Creek.

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This isn't an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm, but it sure preceeded plenty of IH Tractors on THIS Montana Farm. This was the Yaeger Brother's doing cultivation or "summer fallow" on plowed land, on the old homestead near Lewistown, Montana. I know... it's also an encore photo. I recognize my dad on the leading cultivator - pulled by five horses, and uncle Frank, Dad's oldest brother. I can't recognize the rest of Dad's brothers.

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This last picture was a McCormick Binder promotion being done in 1881. Gary ;)

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Re: postcard---Wrangler could relate;

The famous horse Wrangler sez: "thank the good Lord for the invention of tractors"!!!!

That rear plow sure resembles the old wood beam plow I drug home several months ago.

Gotta swipe that pic and print it out when I get on puter----checking in from cell ph tonight.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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