Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Old Binder Guy

IH Truck & Pickup pictures

Recommended Posts

The 348 was a chevrolet engine used in the 1958 models.

The 409 was first used in the 1962 Chevy's.

Czech,

I agree with you... Completely. I was there.

Gary ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was a high wheeler on ebay lately#190056712550. Might be still there

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This picture was taken in August 1967 on the old homestead in the Judith Basin of Montana. In the upper left is my dad coming in his 1963 Scout. Left to right in the lineup is: my father in-law, Lynn Simpson's 1953 Ford 350 (which my wife has inherited), his 1953 R-120 with sprayer, his 90 Massey-Harris, my IH 403 Windrow Special with 18' header, my IH B-170, my IH A-160, and my IH 1100C 4X4. He and I are standing in front of the 403.

I realize this isn't all about IH trucks, but in the Construction Thread, this is called a "thrown track", they tell me.

Gary ;)

post-5643-1165357210_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This picture was taken in August 1967 on the old homestead in the Judith Basin of Montana. In the upper left is my dad coming in his 1963 Scout. Left to right in the lineup is: my father in-law, Lynn Simpson's 1953 Ford 350 (which my wife has inherited), his 1953 R-120 with sprayer, his 90 Massey-Harris, my IH 403 Windrow Special with 18' header, my IH B-170, my IH A-160, and my IH 1100C 4X4. He and I are standing in front of the 403.

I realize this isn't all about IH trucks, but in the Construction Thread, this is called a "thrown track", they tell me.

Gary ;)

Hi Gary

Thats an impressive lineup of machinery and trucks. The 403 sure makes the Massey 90 look small yet I recall the 90 as being a big machine. Course that was in the days when I was just a kid.

Sure is great that somebody had the time and foresight to take pictures in those days. I wish I had more like that. Closest I get is this one from the late seventies showing me beside the White 504 swather cutting some short thin wheat on the hillsides of Jumping Deer creek. The White was powered by the little GM four cylinder 140. Not a bad engine but not much of a swather really. Thats my Dad beside the B-110 IH pickup in the background.

post-90-1165382500_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Gary

Thats an impressive lineup of machinery and trucks. The 403 sure makes the Massey 90 look small yet I recall the 90 as being a big machine. Course that was in the days when I was just a kid.

Sure is great that somebody had the time and foresight to take pictures in those days. I wish I had more like that. Closest I get is this one from the late seventies showing me beside the White 504 swather cutting some short thin wheat on the hillsides of Jumping Deer creek. The White was powered by the little GM four cylinder 140. Not a bad engine but not much of a swather really. Thats my Dad beside the B-110 IH pickup in the background.

Loadstar,

I'm glad you enjoyed the harvest parking scene. One difference in the 90 and the 403 was the height. I could walk up to the 90 and look onto the platform. I had to climb a couple of steps to see the deck of the 403 and of course the 18' header seemed as wide as the fence along the county road, at the time. Years later, I had a 760 Massey Ferguson with a 24' header and it seemed wide too... that was until I looked at a neighbor's big Dear John with a 30' header. The engine being up top also added to the outline of the 403.

I never ever ran an IH swather. My cousins had them, but I didn't, as I had little hay ground and more farm ground.

I'm placing another picture of my A-160 truck, after my wife got it stuck with part of a load of wheat. It wasn't her fault, as I'd asked her to pull out of the stubble and drive through the summer fallow when crossing this coulee, as it was too rough for the frame, dropping into the eroded ditch made by runoff. Notice the back end of the TD-18A backed up to it. I took great care so as to not rip the rear end out of the truck in this case, but it was very stuck. My wife never seemed to enjoy hauling wheat much after this day. She was the best truck driver I ever had and her dad said the same thing. Having made that statement, our son Mike was as good!

post-5643-1165450112_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm placing another picture of my A-160 truck, after my wife got it stuck with part of a load of wheat. It wasn't her fault, as I'd asked her to pull out of the stubble and drive through the summer fallow when crossing this coulee, as it was too rough for the frame, dropping into the eroded ditch made by runoff. Notice the back end of the TD-18A backed up to it. I took great care so as to not rip the rear end out of the truck in this case, but it was very stuck. My wife never seemed to enjoy hauling wheat much after this day. She was the best truck driver I ever had and her dad said the same thing. Having made that statement, our son Mike was as good!

Gary, that is a scary picture pulling a loaded grain truck with a crawler. I have lived in fear of getting stuck with my Loadstar but so far never been stuck yet. I did turn it upside down in a creek once but technically not stuck. I drove it home once we got it up on its wheels again and got the crankcase oil out of the cylinders. Sorry, no pictures of that incident.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
post-1253-1165545866_thumb.jpgThis is our 1971 model 1210 we working on.It has 51000 original miles and was used to haul a camper.The owner died at 91 and I bought it at his sale.We have painted it again since this photoand will repost when it is done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

post-6550-1165579255_thumb.jpgpost-6550-1165579163_thumb.jpg

This was a 1958 IH A-160 truck I had on the farm over in Montana's Judith Basin.

Gary ;)

Looks like my 57 A160 different color but they both have budd rims

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

john r & chrisduncklee,

Thanks for your pictures of IH trucks. I (& we) had quite a few IH trucks and pickups. I'm placing a picture of Dad's 1958 IH A-120 4X4. This is the only photo I can find of it. We used it for about 10 years to feed livestock with, each winter. I only remember one morning its BD240 6 cylinder motor wouldn't start and the battery had failed that time. I remember in March of 1964, when it got down to 47 below zero three nights in a row. Not 46 and not 48... 47 degrees below. This shed the truck was in was not insulated nor heated. It was a little stiff when it first started and turning over the oil in the tranny after dropping the clutch would cut her a few RPMs. And remember those old Nylon tires? It would clunk along for about five minutes, as you started to drive away.

Notice the little steam engine behind the A-120. Dad wasn't much of a machinist or mechanic, but he was one heck of a blacksmith and welder. Notice it is hooked to an air hose and he never went any further with the project, as he maxed out his skills to this point. It runs great and is in my son's shed near Helena... Kind of a "momument to Granddad."

Gary ;)

post-5643-1165599861_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
john r & chrisduncklee,

Thanks for your pictures of IH trucks. I (& we) had quite a few IH trucks and pickups. I'm placing a picture of Dad's 1958 IH A-120 4X4. This is the only photo I can find of it. We used it for about 10 years to feed livestock with, each winter. I only remember one morning its BD240 6 cylinder motor wouldn't start and the battery had failed that time. I remember in March of 1964, when it got down to 47 below zero three nights in a row. Not 46 and not 48... 47 degrees below. This shed the truck was in was not insulated nor heated. It was a little stiff when it first started and turning over the oil in the tranny after dropping the clutch would cut her a few RPMs. And remember those old Nylon tires? It would clunk along for about five minutes, as you started to drive away.

Notice the little steam engine behind the A-120. Dad wasn't much of a machinist or mechanic, but he was one heck of a blacksmith and welder. Notice it is hooked to an air hose and he never went any further with the project, as he maxed out his skills to this point. It runs great and is in my son's shed near Helena... Kind of a "momument to Granddad."

Gary ;)

Funny you mention the nylon tires ,was telling my farm hand about those things the other day. I remember driving my dads old truck to school in the winter and it took all of the time to the donut shop to make them right.my friend and I would say it had square tires cause it sure felt that way great memories Chris D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Funny you mention the nylon tires ,was telling my farm hand about those things the other day. I remember driving my dads old truck to school in the winter and it took all of the time to the donut shop to make them right.my friend and I would say it had square tires cause it sure felt that way great memories Chris D

chrisduncklee,

"Square" may have been more rythmic? The nylon tires in cold weather were like a pie with a quarter missing, trying to roll down the road, with that synchopated beat. Then when you started to turn, the rythm all changed to a different beat.

Gary ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know the model of Scotty Zion House Moving's IH truck, but here is a picture of his moving company moving a Montana Elevator Co. elevator from Kolin, Montana to Moore. The Montana Elevator Company (name then) moved it to Moore to house their fertilizer operation. I've known Great Falls' Scotty Zion most of my life and he has moved more structures in Montana than anyone else I know of. The farm in the background was my late father in-law Lynn Simpson's and he took this picture in November of 1973. My lovely wife of 43+ years grew up there too.

Gary ;)

post-5643-1165950655_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't know the model of Scotty Zion House Moving's IH truck, but here is a picture of his moving company moving a Montana Elevator Co. elevator from Kolin, Montana to Moore. The Montana Elevator Company (name then) moved it to Moore to house their fertilizer operation. I've known Great Falls' Scotty Zion most of my life and he has moved more structures in Montana than anyone else I know of. The farm in the background was my late father in-law Lynn Simpson's and he took this picture in November of 1973. My lovely wife of 43+ years grew up there too.

Gary ;)

That's impressive to me. I've never seen anyone move a building that big before.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gary, thats a familiar sight, moving wooden grain elevators. We have seen a lot of that in Sask. in the past. Here is a picture of what is as far as I know the biggest one ever moved. Right out of my home town. It was a long slow process. They put 142 wheels underneath the 800,000 pound building and it took several days to move it down the highway some twenty miles but it was a success.

Those two Quad-tracs on the front were brought in by a nearby CIH dealer to help out crossing the creek but I think the trucks could have handled it alone. They had one truck at the back as a pusher as well as the one pulliing.

post-90-1165974508_thumb.jpg

post-90-1165974561_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

post-1253-1165978013_thumb.jpgThis is our 1956 S120 4X4.Most of the mechanical work is done.wheel bearings,seals brakes and we have all the rubber stuff for the doors and windows etc. Waiting is turn for the body work.

I wonder how I did that?

post-1253-1165978015_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John, great to see you are saving another old S truck. Looks like you have a little snow there too. My S is one of the bigger 160 series. Here it is beside my R-160 gravel truck.

post-90-1165979961_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
post-1253-1165987647_thumb.jpgNot sure how I posted that twice. This is the decals for the shift patterns.There is another similar decal left of the steering column I can't read.Can anyone help with that? I would get some made by a sign shop

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[]Not sure how I posted that twice. This is the decals for the shift patterns.There is another similar decal left of the steering column I can't read.Can anyone help with that? I would get some made by a sign shop

I'll check my S-160 John but I don't recall any decals on the dash at all. Yours would likely be unique to a 4 wheel drive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
post-1253-1166130430_thumb.jpgThis C99 is not mine .[yet]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John, good luck getting the C-99. Thats the Canadian version of the C900 compact pickup. I always liked the looks of the C series trucks. Theres a C 110 thats been parked for years in one of the towns near me. Have to get a picture of it some day.

A neighbour many years ago had a short box pickup, think it was a C or D series but it had the big 240 or 264 engine so don't think it was the C-99.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
post-1253-1166314392_thumb.jpgpost-1253-1166314165_thumb.jpgThis an $200 auction S160 that was bought to supply parts for th S120 4X4 ;however it has only 44xxx miles stored inside,original seat is excellent,nice floormat with IH on the hump and the hard to find S headlite rings are near perfect.Motor runs ,needs brakes. I guess I am now looking for parts for 2 trucks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John, your right, that S160 is way too nice to part out. And you know if your not too fussy about details I think most any headlight ring could be used. I found one in the junk collection here that fit right onto mine. Its a little different but still looks better than the old crumpled one. Got too close to a combine header I'm guessing.

What is the extra lever on the floor of this red truck? P.t.o. maybe?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those headlite rings on the S models stuck out so they were "first on the sean" of any bump Plus the short production run and only used on that model makes them scarce. The extra stick on the 160 is the pto. I think the 4X4 has 5 sticks and I may add a winch if the cab is wide enuff for more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...