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Old Binder Guy

IH Truck & Pickup pictures

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I wanted to post the only photo I can find of my 1960 B-100 IH pickup. I bought it with a 266 v8 and four speed and the cost FOB Lewistown, Montana was $1747. That little 266 was quite an engine and I beat and outran, for a while, a 52 Ford Victoria, 1955 Olds 88 and a 1954 Chevy. If I still owned this pickup, I wouldn't treat it like that. I had it at Fort Knox in the summer of 1961 and had a blast with it. I had a carload of guys behind me in Louisville and got "cornered". They didn't cut my throat or steal my Binder, they couldn't read what was embossed on the bottom of my Montana license plate... "PRISON MADE"!

My Car was a 1962 Pontiac Catalina with TriPower and the steam engines were a 20hp Nichols & Shepard and a 16hp Russell.

Gary ;)

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Gary, thats a nice looking old B truck. They are my favourite series of IH. I'd guess that 266 sounded much like the 304 in my Loadstar 1600. Dual glass packs give it a nice rumble.

Heres my B-110. Its got the BD264 with three on the tree. Wish it was a four speed. Its currently retired and resting in my shed.

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I love that style. I'm real close to bringing dad's B-150 to my house to get running again. Actually, it runs good, just needs brake work. My brother and I were standing on the seat in '72 and dad hit the brakes, and I hit the windshield, and my brother broke the ashtray with his head. I go by that truck almost every day and that spider-webbed windshield takes me back. ^_^

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Good looking truck. I like that style IH truck. I am looking at a 1968 model with a V8.

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Thanks for all of your appreciation of my first new pickup, the B-100. Yes the 266 sounded like the 304, like the one in my second new IH pickup. I bought this second pickup in 1967. It is an early 1967, as later 67s had the 1968 type grille, as I remember. It is an 1100 4X4 with custom interior and carpeting! That is my son Mike beside it in May of 1968 and his efficient mom had the picture marked "31montns". He just turned 41 (years) recently.

Gary ;)

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This was an old IH truck my dad and his brothers had. I remember sitting in the cab as a kid and was fascinated by the headlights mounted on the side, rather than up front as normally seen. It was a 6 cylinder but I'm thinking they still called it a "Six Speed Special"? Could some of you IH buffs straighten out my situation?

They were shown at Glengarry, Montana (pop. 8) moving a Concoc oil tank to the farm. They used this for diesel fuel for their TracTracTors!

Gary ;)

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Great pics OBG doesn't even look like the old girls squattin, what was the axle at the back some pole trailer?

Do you recall the amount to fill that tank back then?

Sorry to sidetrack but did that Catalina have a 348 or 409, can't remember the first year of 409, 63's had them for sure and I think they came out a little earlier but were plagued with some problems on year one. I'm certain this would have been too early for the 389's?

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Great pics OBG doesn't even look like the old girls squattin, what was the axle at the back some pole trailer?

Do you recall the amount to fill that tank back then?

Sorry to sidetrack but did that Catalina have a 348 or 409, can't remember the first year of 409, 63's had them for sure and I think they came out a little earlier but were plagued with some problems on year one. I'm certain this would have been too early for the 389's?

Lance,

When I filed the truck picture, I thought to myself I should have also added this one. It wasn't too hard to find. I wish I could remember what Dad said it held. They filled one time, he said. I just remember him going to the phone several times over the years, cranking up "Central", getting connected to the local Conoco distributor and asked to have Orville haul out "a thousand gallons."

That Pontiac Catalina had a 389 TriPower. The big one that year was the 421 Super duty. I used to have a friend who REALLY knew his stuff (still has a racing oriented shop in Lewistown) and bought a 389 Super Duty. They only built less than 10 (maybe half that?). There wasn't a 421 that could touch him. It had less cubes, but also only one 4 barrel, instead of two. I don't think that guy would come looking for me with a baseball bat, if I said, he is "the oldest teenager in Montana."

Gary ;)

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I guess it was a pole/wagon trailer kinda :lol: Love looking at all the things and ways our forefathers accomplished things with the equipment and technology of the day and of course before DOT and OH&S :ph34r:

I think King of Obsolete is a member on SS but if you've never visited his website you may find it interesting as he has quite a few pics of similar stuff, house moving, pulling cats out of 90' of water etc. He has a link to his website at the bottom of any post he makes.

Looks like the towns population really increased for the day of the move, our phone originally on the farm only connected to the neighbours, then it really got high tech when the party lines arrived, I'm sure some of cellphone younguns would think we're makin this up. 1000 gals probably would only bring that thing up a foot?

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I guess it was a pole/wagon trailer kinda :lol: Love looking at all the things and ways our forefathers accomplished things with the equipment and technology of the day and of course before DOT and OH&S :ph34r:

I think King of Obsolete is a member on SS but if you've never visited his website you may find it interesting as he has quite a few pics of similar stuff, house moving, pulling cats out of 90' of water etc. He has a link to his website at the bottom of any post he makes.

Looks like the towns population really increased for the day of the move, our phone originally on the farm only connected to the neighbours, then it really got high tech when the party lines arrived, I'm sure some of cellphone younguns would think we're makin this up. 1000 gals probably would only bring that thing up a foot?

I enjoy the stuff before DOT and OSHA bunches. Just look at my steam engine sometime. Oh... Protect me from myself! And the kids wouldn't understand our old oak crank phone... and we're not making it up. Now I agree about the one foot a thousand gallons would raise in that tank, or not much over two feet. But the part that gets me... That fuel cost $200! :o

Gary ;)

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This was an old IH truck my dad and his brothers had. I remember sitting in the cab as a kid and was fascinated by the headlights mounted on the side, rather than up front as normally seen. It was a 6 cylinder but I'm thinking they still called it a "Six Speed Special"? Could some of you IH buffs straighten out my situation?

Sure does look like the six speed special that I see locally here. In fact my brother drove it in several local parades as it belonged to the business where he worked. Seems to me there was a lot of wood in that cab too. They were the S series of the 1920s, not sure of the number, maybe an S22 or S26.

Heres how it looked in 2005.

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This was an old IH truck my dad and his brothers had. I remember sitting in the cab as a kid and was fascinated by the headlights mounted on the side, rather than up front as normally seen. It was a 6 cylinder but I'm thinking they still called it a "Six Speed Special"? Could some of you IH buffs straighten out my situation?

Sure does look like the six speed special that I see locally here. In fact my brother drove it in several local parades as it belonged to the business where he worked. Seems to me there was a lot of wood in that cab too. They were the S series of the 1920s, not sure of the number, maybe an S22 or S26.

Heres how it looked in 2005.

Loadstar,

I sure appreciate your placing those photos here. Judging from the cab and front end, this IS the truck. I think you may be right about the S series. I have an original partsbook that lists a four and six cylinder engine, and I don't know if that would make an S series truck a 6 Speed Special or not?

Thanks again,

Gary ;)

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I'm adding a picture of a 1927 Six Speed Special that comes to our Northwest Antique Power Association show here, near Kalispell. The truck beside it is an Autocar.

The second picture is of a Six Speed Special loading onto an upper Missouri River Ferry, here in Montana. The closest person, with his back to us is my dad. They were driving to the north side of the Big Muddy to check out a 20hp Case steam engine, for irrigating and threshing alfalfa seed, for a cousin. They bought the steam engine for $50 and drove it down to the river and drained it. After a bitter cold snap in the winter, they chopped a hole in the ice, pumped water into the engine, started a fire and drove it across on the ice; pulled the fire and drained it until spring. This ferry wouldn't have supported that engine, I guess?

My third picture is of my son Mike and an old International Harvester truck at Fort Benton several years ago. I would have loved to buy the truck which came up for auction, but it didn't fit my budget at the time. I love those old trucks with the sloped hood and rear radiator, like this. By the way, Fort Benton, Montana was our first town and it is the world's innermost port, approximately 3495 miles from salt water.

Gary ;)

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Gary, just quickly scanning through my Internatiional truck reference book I see that those slope nose models were built from 1915 to 1923. They actually had the radiator at the back of the engine which allowed such a sloped hood and reverse opening (tilt forward).

The one in your picture looks like a real project for somebody.

On the S series,, I'm pretty sure the one my brother drives in parades is a six cylinder Waukesha. The book mentions Lycoming engines too.

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My Dad had an old wooden cab/door International truck on his farm. He really stepped up and bought a 1929 Chev truck. He said the poor old IH was ready to "fall apart", literally. :P:P:P

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Gary, just quickly scanning through my Internatiional truck reference book I see that those slope nose models were built from 1915 to 1923. They actually had the radiator at the back of the engine which allowed such a sloped hood and reverse opening (tilt forward).

The one in your picture looks like a real project for somebody.

On the S series,, I'm pretty sure the one my brother drives in parades is a six cylinder Waukesha. The book mentions Lycoming engines too.

Loadstar,

I'd heard somewhere that some of these rear radiator trucks also had the same engine as the rear radiator 8-16 International tractors?

Gary ;)

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I know this isn't a truck picture... In Construction, you'd call this a "thrown track" picture. A young friend of mine bought this IHC Auto Buggy at an auction sale at Pendroy, Montana this past September. I saw it in a parade in Great Falls in 1956 and have it on 16mm film. It was a beautiful car then and will be when my friend is done with it. There is some question as to its age. The original owner called it a 1907 and I can find nothing like it in CH Wendell's 150 Years of International Harvester. I don't know its age. Maybe one of you will know? The "highwheels" are lower than most and the "radiator" (air cooled) is unusual too.

Gary ;)

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I know this isn't a truck picture... In Construction, you'd call this a "thrown track" picture. A young friend of mine bought this IHC Auto Buggy at an auction sale at Pendroy, Montana this past September. I saw it in a parade in Great Falls in 1956 and have it on 16mm film. It was a beautiful car then and will be when my friend is done with it. There is some question as to its age. The original owner called it a 1907 and I can find nothing like it in CH Wendell's 150 Years of International Harvester. I don't know its age. Maybe one of you will know? The "highwheels" are lower than most and the "radiator" (air cooled) is unusual too.

Gary ;)

1907 sounds about right Gary. My book says the first Auto Buggys rolled out of the factory in February of 1907. It had a little two cylinder engine, air cooled and rated at 25 hp.

A friend of mine took a picture of a nicely restored Auto Buggy at a car show in B.C. last summer.

Regarding the shared engines between the slope hood trucks and the 8-16 tractors, I see no mention of it in my book but its a possibillity.

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I agree about the one foot a thousand gallons would raise in that tank, or not much over two feet. Gary ;)

Rule of thumb from my 16 years of crushing soybeans and making soybean oil.

In a 13' diameter tank, 1' in height = 1000 gallons.

It would appear that that tank in the photo was nearly 13' in diameter.

:)

Mike

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I know this isn't a truck picture... In Construction, you'd call this a "thrown track" picture. A young friend of mine bought this IHC Auto Buggy at an auction sale at Pendroy, Montana this past September. I saw it in a parade in Great Falls in 1956 and have it on 16mm film. Gary ;)

Heres the pic I have that a friend took this past summer at a car show in B.C. Canada. Its listed as a 1910 IHC Auto Wagon.

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Loadstar,

Thanks for posting that Auto Wagon picture. That sure looks like a real honey. I posted a couple more of my pictures of old IH trucks. The first one was one owned by the Dissley Brothers at the Fergus County Creamery at Lewistown, Montana, where I was born and raised. The wheels are a little lower on this one, indicating it may have been a little later unit? Maybe 1913 or 14? Just a guess on my part. The second one was of the Thurston Brothers in North Dakota. Donn Thurston is a fellow NWAPA member and lives here in the Flathead Valley. Donn was younger than the boys on this Auto Wagon, but used to ride in it. Their dad bought it for them and to use on the farm.

I don't know for sure about the 8-16 tractor and sloped hood trucks and their motors either. I had the privelege of working in IH parts with one of those old "one man shows" who knew the parts numbers on all older farmall, combine and truck parts, and remembered most of them on anything new. He had one of each and I just thought he said they had the same engine? I've been sick in bed for a few days and I did drag out my CH Wendell's 150 Years book and regarding the 8-16, he doesn't say they had the same engine, but he did state on page 290, "The entire design was similar to that used in the then current International trucks, with the radiator located over the flywheel housing. The 8-16 International engines were of the same demensions as the power plant used in the Model G trucks." The same and "the same dimmensions" aren't "THE SAME" in my book?

Gary ;)

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I know this isn't a truck picture... In Construction, you'd call this a "thrown track" picture. A young friend of mine bought this IHC Auto Buggy at an auction sale at Pendroy, Montana this past September. I saw it in a parade in Great Falls in 1956 and have it on 16mm film. It was a beautiful car then and will be when my friend is done with it. There is some question as to its age. The original owner called it a 1907 and I can find nothing like it in CH Wendell's 150 Years of International Harvester. I don't know its age. Maybe one of you will know? The "highwheels" are lower than most and the "radiator" (air cooled) is unusual too.

Gary ;)

Prior to 1910, there was no hood, only a flat dash board with a round fuel tank hanging on the front. Therefore this has to be a 1910 or later. With the second seat installed, whether it's an Autobuggy or an Autowagon with the optional second seat installed becomes difficult to determine, but from the picts in Crismon's International Trucks book, the Buggy has the second seat as an integral part of the body while the Wagon has the second seat setting on top of the sides sometimes with an entrance cut away, much like this one.

For some reason, many owners of what are obviously Autowagons insist on calling them Autobuggies so you can't be too sure even if you get the info from the owner. Wendell has a photo labelled a 1907 Autowagon, but IH published a list of serial numbers, reproduced in Crismon's book, that shows the first Autowagon, #501, as built in 1909. The pict in Wendell may well be a 1907 prototype or something, as it appears to be more crudely built that later production models.

And I have heard for years that the ball bearing engine design was shared between trucks and tractors, whether it was an identical engine or not.

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Howard P,

Thanks for your info, as I don't claim to be any authority on old IH stuff, just kind of a "stood by" old timer on some old things. I have a nice picture of a flat dash Auto Buggy, with the cylindrical tank you speak of, in my shop. I know what you speak of. I'd have to agree with you.

Gary ;)

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Great pics OBG doesn't even look like the old girls squattin, what was the axle at the back some pole trailer?

Do you recall the amount to fill that tank back then?

Sorry to sidetrack but did that Catalina have a 348 or 409, can't remember the first year of 409, 63's had them for sure and I think they came out a little earlier but were plagued with some problems on year one. I'm certain this would have been too early for the 389's?

The 348 was a chevrolet engine used in the 1958 models.

The 409 was first used in the 1962 Chevy's.

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