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Massey Harris 44 any good


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This August at a local auction one is coming up for sale in running condition a wheatland model has pto, any ways was wondering how good where they compared to the competition and where they reliable? How many where made? are parts still avaiable?

 

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Seems like there were a ton of them sold on the prairies

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Had a Massey Harris 26 combine that was pretty good. So it should be a good 44 if taken care of .

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Dad had a 33 with a stanhoist loader to clean out the cattle barn when I was a kid. Skid steer took its place later on. 3 point hitch. I drove it some, tho I wasn't very old when it left the farm. 

The hyd resivouir was behind the grille, in front of the radiator. Dad thought that was not helpful when they were a tillage tractor when they were the big dogs on some farms. There were a few other things that he cited as being inherent problems with them. As said above they were an ok tractor. 

Oh across the road my uncle had several 44s and at least one 44 6? 

One sat in the yard for years and finally my cousin told me the deal. Uncle bought it at an auction and had him drive it home, he was a teenager at the time. My uncle forgot to explain how the Dual power worked. So he threw it wide open or nearly so and drove it home. By the time he got home the engine was not in such good shape. 

Other guys know more about them I'm sure, but my understanding was with the dual power you had a second range on the throttle you could over ride the governor to an extent to power thru a tough spot. All I recall is I was told to NOT use the 2nd range on the throttle.

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The 44 was the Farmall M of Massy Harris. Same kind of reputation. Probably the most numerous Massey tractor ever built.

As long as it isn't one with the Continental engine or the Chrysler straight 6... Those are rarer but kind of "dogs" as tractors.

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26 minutes ago, Matt Kirsch said:

The 44 was the Farmall M of Massy Harris. Same kind of reputation. Probably the most numerous Massey tractor ever built.

As long as it isn't one with the Continental engine or the Chrysler straight 6... Those are rarer but kind of "dogs" as tractors.

  Most were outfitted with the Continental H 260 which had a deep stroke.  A pretty good engine for the time.  Power-wise the 44 was in between the M and Super M. The Chrysler engine was a result of Continental having other contract commitments which limited production to MH for a time.  1st gear was midway on the transmission input shaft which was rather long so there were/are 44''s that will not shift into first if run in 1st under heavy load i.e. plowing.  

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There was an old guy from Cave City, AR that had either a 44 or 444. He mostly baled hay and raised watermelons. The old tractor was pretty stout as I remember, but I don't really know anything about it. He finally got too old to go and the kids set it beside the road with a for sale sign on it. I stopped and looked at it once, but neither me or the son could get it to start so I passed on it. They were pretty rare in this part of the world, and I've not really seen any Massey Harris tractors around here since that one. 

Mac

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1 minute ago, MacAR said:

There was an old guy from Cave City, AR that had either a 44 or 444. He mostly baled hay and raised watermelons. The old tractor was pretty stout as I remember, but I don't really know anything about it. He finally got too old to go and the kids set it beside the road with a for sale sign on it. I stopped and looked at it once, but neither me or the son could get it to start so I passed on it. They were pretty rare in this part of the world, and I've not really seen any Massey Harris tractors around here since that one. 

Mac

  They were built in Wisconsin and mostly sold around the Great Lakes region of the US.

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2 hours ago, 766 Man said:

  They were built in Wisconsin and mostly sold around the Great Lakes region of the US.

I figured they were from "up there" somewhere, but never knew where. Mostly IH, JD, and Ford/Ferguson in this part of the South. There are a few odd-balls around but nothing of any quantity. 

Mac

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2 hours ago, 766 Man said:

  They were built in Wisconsin and mostly sold around the Great Lakes region of the US.

Do you know where MH had a factory here?

Mike

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Just now, Absent Minded Farmer said:

Do you know where MH had a factory here?

Mike

  Racine but I don't know where in that city.  Probably something that was long ago bulldozed to the ground.  

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I know were there is a 44 western or standard diesel sitting under a collapsed shed.  A neighbor of mine from MN has a rowcrop 44 that was his family’s growing up on a diary farm.  Those are the only two 44s I’ve seen.  The 55/555 were a little bit more popular but not like JD or IH or even Case.  But they made up for it in combines. 

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there was a good number of them around here. I think mostly Standard versions. I never heard anything negative on them although they are a little primitive . But I will add don't pay big bucks for them. They are not highly sought after in the Farmall H category. 

Some scans from my Massey Book. They made a version in Britian I would buy if one came up

image.thumb.jpeg.75fdbd728ab936e6cc3d9c3fb8ec2906.jpeg

image.thumb.jpeg.c0e651c9caf2da818ba11b87392e28ac.jpeg

image.thumb.jpeg.9fc25dd24e211b4b79a828c638fa1ab2.jpeg

image.thumb.jpeg.8b51205ec23b6594f5ae151990b3c61c.jpeg

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I ran a 55 standard as a kid working for a farmer. He was also a machinist/blacksmith and this 55 had the biggest, heaviest built Farmhand style loader I've ever seen. The bucket was massive,  built from 1/2" sheet steel, about 9 or 10 feet wide and had cable curl. I'm guessing it was all shop built by the owner. It had power steering and no road gear. Top speed about 6 mph. The guy who owned it really liked it. I thought it was big and clumsy.  But that's pretty much any standard tread tractor with a big old cage style Farmhand. The tractor itself seemed to ne a pretty powerful and capable machine.

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22 minutes ago, lotsaIHCs said:

I ran a 55 standard as a kid working for a farmer. He was also a machinist/blacksmith and this 55 had the biggest, heaviest built Farmhand style loader I've ever seen. The bucket was massive,  built from 1/2" sheet steel, about 9 or 10 feet wide and had cable curl. I'm guessing it was all shop built by the owner. It had power steering and no road gear. Top speed about 6 mph. The guy who owned it really liked it. I thought it was big and clumsy.  But that's pretty much any standard tread tractor with a big old cage style Farmhand. The tractor itself seemed to ne a pretty powerful and capable machine.

The 55 was a brutish tractor.  Outclassed anything IH and JD had for a long time.  My 55 is a Western Special.   Arched front axle and a hand clutch 

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I sold a 44Special Diesel and a 444 gas last year, both were wide front row crops, both ran good. Also sold a 770 gas  wide front row crop Oliver and a n H John Deere. Was downsizing some. I did keep a 44 Diesel standard in it's work clothes. It runs good.

DWF

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6 hours ago, 766 Man said:

  Racine but I don't know where in that city.  Probably something that was long ago bulldozed to the ground.  

I always thought the Massey Harris tractor factory (Wallis or J. I. Case Plow Company) was near the J. I Case Threshing Machine Co. factories 

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My FIL had one that I got running for him.  He left the muffler uncovered one fall/winter and it seized up on him.  I tore it down, cleaned up the bores, checked the tolerances and put new rings in it.  Everything was pretty much new spec.  I don’t know how many hours were on it, but looked low hour to me.  I haven’t driven it much, but the transmission is a bit of a mystery.  It also has a hand clutch for live power.  I’m assuming it’s like the add on for Farmall H and Ms.  I believe it also had live hydraulics and might have had a 3 pt at one time.  

My sister in law has the tractor now and wanted a wide front on it, so they found another MH 44 that a guy was giving away.  It’s in poor shape overall, but does run.  So now there is a second one sitting there.  I will have to look at swapping the axels someday for them.
 

 

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Dad had a couple 44 specials's and a 44-6. They were ok but I wasnt too fond of them! Seen too many front pedestal castings broke due to poor made thin castings! MM U and UB were indestructable! LOL!

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