Jump to content

Stainless vs steel guns.


Recommended Posts

6 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

I went with a girl who was about 4’11” and maybe 90 lbs. We went out shooting with her grandfather, he had something in 300wby mag, maybe a model 700? She put a full magazine through it from a standing position, I was very very impressed. She was a real piece of work. 

Tall or wide? 
 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not sure this matters but SS can work harden quickly as machinists will know, might be an effect that would be positive in this case? I don't live by saltwater and never saw a benefit to sneaking around with a shiny object in my hand, one of the reasons I never found another acceptable 44 mag is none of the ones I'm interested in are available in blue or black, not that we can buy one with the current rules by our crime minister.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Ihfan4life said:

Tall or wide? 
 

Tall. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Get it . It will be great !

when is the Shootenfeast ? 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ruger makes a sturdy rifle. I personally don’t feel the 77 is as accurate as some others out there. It’s plenty accurate for most hunting situations that 99% of people will find themselves in. With that said, their Precision rifle line is very accurate for the money and can keep up with guns that are far more expensive. I have seen that personally shooting long range from a bench.

Otherwise, their isn’t a tougher .22 pistol made by anyone than Ruger (my opinion). The 10/22 speaks for itself and has done since the 1960’s. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

just a thot, if SS was questionable, poor performance and unreliable/inaccurate i believe there would not be any being built

if they were so horrible there would be many people jumping on the bashing bandwagon like a fly on butter

I know someone that has both, likes both, no issues with either that my friend has mentioned to be aware of - he is not a professional marksman or full time hunter/shooter so for the average fella that uses his stuff like spend away

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldn't sweat it.....looks like I nice rifle.

I almost bought a #1 in 7x57 once......still regret that a little......perfect chambering for a #1.

I have often considered a 77 or a winchester 70 in 7-08....very similar to your "want" 😀

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, 560Dennis said:

Get it . It will be great !

when is the Shootenfeast ? 

Schützenfest 
this is what I was trying to convey

Schützenfest

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm no hunter but rather a clay shooter so own mostly shotguns only a few rifles but my observation is that a long shot in New England is not likely to be as much as a hundred yards. Massachusetts deer is shotgun only and that dates back to pre Kennedy years. It seems that if I was hunting Bambi I'd want a heavy bullet not likely to be tipped by a twig. Most of my rifle shooting is ground hog or beaver and a .22 LR in does the trick.

I've seen a few rifles and one shotgun that were hard chromed for corrosion resistance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, New Englander said:

I'm no hunter but rather a clay shooter so own mostly shotguns only a few rifles but my observation is that a long shot in New England is not likely to be as much as a hundred yards. Massachusetts deer is shotgun only and that dates back to pre Kennedy years. It seems that if I was hunting Bambi I'd want a heavy bullet not likely to be tipped by a twig. Most of my rifle shooting is ground hog or beaver and a .22 LR in does the trick.

I've seen a few rifles and one shotgun that were hard chromed for corrosion resistance.

There’s plenty of open fields where you could get 3-500 yards, but the question is why…?

 I’ve seen deer taken down at 300 and they flat out DROP. 
I would like to shoot long range shots on a shooting range, just to say I did it, but I don’t need to. 
The “clay guys”, skeet shooters are mighty proud of their high dollar stainless steel shotguns and don’t like being shown up with someone with an old beat up pump gun…on his first visit to the range, fyi😎

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, acem said:

Any opinions on the Ruger m77 vs Winchester classic 70?

They do seem very similar. 

Dad has a Winchester model 70 Featherweight, its a beautiful gun and shoots as good as it looks, I would say based on the M77 i have here they are pretty neck and neck from a handling standpoint, virtually the same features and proportions. Similar build quality and maybe just a little more panache on the model 70 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a Winchester Model 70 featherweight in 270 and another Model 70 in 30-06.  Pretty guns.  I don't have a Ruger 77, but I have a beautiful No 1 in 243, and a couple of their over and unders plus a few pistols.  All good guns.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ruger's customer service can't be beat. Any gun off the shelf can out shoot me. I am not a long shooter. I like wood and blue/black. I am a Savage/Ruger guy. I like my guns to show a little wear over time. When I give them a little love, it triggers memories.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

28 minutes ago, cobfly said:

Ruger's  When I give them a little love, it triggers memories.

....nice little '' play on words ''   there, Cobb  ...:)

Mike

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a stainless Ruger M77 in .270 skeleton stock as it’s called around here what the other here called the boat paddle. I’ve shot targets out to 500yrds with it. I only got one deer with it 150-200yd shot, it hit where I aim it. I never claimed to have good shot placement. Like others said the stainless Guns are plenty accurate. I never had good confidence when shooting it though but it’s me not the rifle.

I also have a stainless Ruger in .22 same stock as the 270. Has the 10rd rotary mag. My brother and I were plinking one afternoon we set up a few rows of blue rocks in our dirt backstop. Our farthest bench on our range is 200 yd. We were hitting the clays from there. Took us a few founds to get the point of aim. About a foot over the target I think. Anyway my 22 was already warmed up and I didn’t see any change in accuracy. Only thing inaccurate about that 22 is the crap Tasco scope on it. 
 

Matt 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

And .308 is the perfect calibre in my opinion.  I am going to say it’s maybe the closest-to-perfectly balanced cartridge ever made.   I came from overbore magnum cartridges, and then found the 308.  
 

The 308 is the “466” of cartridges.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Sask466 said:

And .308 is the perfect calibre in my opinion.  I am going to say it’s maybe the closest-to-perfectly balanced cartridge ever made.   I came from overbore magnum cartridges, and then found the 308.  
 

The 308 is the “466” of cartridges.  

...thems   fightin ' words  !!!!

...that should give this topic  a shake up.....:unsure:

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, Ihfan4life said:

The “clay guys”, skeet shooters are mighty proud of their high dollar stainless steel shotguns and don’t like being shown up with someone with an old beat up pump gun…on his first visit to the range, fyi😎

The only stainless steel and hard chromed shotguns I've ever seen are for hunting waterfowl, not on a skeet or trap field. Black finish with a synthetic stock that'll double for the lost boat paddle.

I don't shoot much skeet anymore but hope to get back into it. I've got nothing fancier than a Beretta Black Onyx and most of the guys I've shot with don't have any bespoke guns. I have found that when I was riding target too far and missing doubles the cure was to break out an old Mossberg  pump. The need to rack the action for the next shot would speed me up. The guys at the ranges I've used have the attitude of bring whatever you have, I've seen even bolt action guns and saw a kid who actually was getting some doubles with one!

Being on a layover back when I worked for a company that was into shooting and didn't mind me carrying a gun in the baggage I used to visit skeet ranges. Other guys might carry a golf bag but I'd rather watch paint dry. Anyway, at a range near Scottsdale I saw more Krieghoffs than they probably have at the factory. There's some serious money there!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm sure your meaning Win?

That was one cartridge that never really interested me 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

59 minutes ago, New Englander said:

The only stainless steel and hard chromed shotguns I've ever seen are for hunting waterfowl, not on a skeet or trap field. Black finish with a synthetic stock that'll double for the lost boat paddle.

I don't shoot much skeet anymore but hope to get back into it. I've got nothing fancier than a Beretta Black Onyx and most of the guys I've shot with don't have any bespoke guns. I have found that when I was riding target too far and missing doubles the cure was to break out an old Mossberg  pump. The need to rack the action for the next shot would speed me up. The guys at the ranges I've used have the attitude of bring whatever you have, I've seen even bolt action guns and saw a kid who actually was getting some doubles with one!

Being on a layover back when I worked for a company that was into shooting and didn't mind me carrying a gun in the baggage I used to visit skeet ranges. Other guys might carry a golf bag but I'd rather watch paint dry. Anyway, at a range near Scottsdale I saw more Krieghoffs than they probably have at the factory. There's some serious money there!

I agree. It's about hitting the most targets, not who has the most expensive gun. I've always been a Browning Citori guy. Although my first over and under was a Black Onyx 686 that I still have.  All good guns. It's mostly about how the shotgun fits you, not who makes it. I'm also a very good shot with my Mossberg 500 pump with plastic stocks. That is my go-to hunting gun, even though I have a bunch of fancy shotguns too.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Sask466 said:

And .308 is the perfect calibre in my opinion.  I am going to say it’s maybe the closest-to-perfectly balanced cartridge ever made.   I came from overbore magnum cartridges, and then found the 308.  
 

The 308 is the “466” of cartridges.  

I like it a lot, it has its shortcomings, but it’s everything I need it to be, and it’s available and relatively inexpensive.
I have a 30-06 in my possession that appears unfired, no scratches on the magazine floor plate, no scratches on the bolt, no powder fouling anywhere around the chamber. I bought 500 rounds of 06’ ammunition to go with it, but even though it’s an all weather M77 I just can’t get excited about it . 

6.5 creedmoor would be a mighty good choice too, perhaps better, but while it has risen above the obscure hotshot and flavor of the week, I personally don’t see it having the staying power of .308, although they are quite similar. 

IMG_6268.jpeg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a Remington 700 long action in .264 Win Mag with the stainless barrel.

Stainless was used here because of throat erosion problem in the 264.

It did slow that process.

Stainless will shoot as straight as steel.

Mine would not hit a barn until I found the lug was loose in the stock.

The action would move 1/4" back and forth in the stock.

We Acra-Glassed the action into the stock and she shoots "Dead Nuts" on now.

There are a number of issues why a gun is not accurate and the factory missed it.

I think you will find a problem, like I did, and after it is fixed, you will have a great "Shooter".

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're going to get a lot of replies here, but I've been involved with machining stainless to very tight tolerances in my career, including in sensitive aerospace and medical device applications. I can't see machining/manufacturing being any cause for inaccuracy. I suspect this kind of a reputation would likely be rooted in aversion to newness, and the reputation (like so many unfounded, yet widely held, opinions) has stuck.

My opinion is worth every penny you've paid for it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...