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Questions on Planting Sorghum with a 950 Cyclo


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I was working on my planter in the shop yesterday and a farmer asked if I could possibly plant sorghum in some wetter spots if needed after his corn.  I do have a  144 hole sorghum drum I got with my 800 but never used it. .104" diameter holes. I told him I only had one drum, so could possibly do 6 rows corn and 6 rows sorghum. Would have to adjust population and planting depth accordingly with each half of the planter. It has hydraulic drives that can be set differently on each hopper. Not sure what to run for air pressure, nothing in the book on that. 

Or use my 800 6 row for just the sorghum. His chemical program would probably need to change. 

 

https://talk.newagtalk.com/forums/thread-view.asp?tid=219346&DisplayType=flat&setCookie=1

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  • FarmerFixEmUp changed the title to Questions on Planting Sorghum with a 950 Cyclo

I would just get some shorter season corn and forget the milo. The few times we had late milo, it wasn’t very good and there were nothing but problems with crop dry down. Wet corn is easier to harvest than wet milo and low quality, wet corn is easy to blend if you have a lot of good corn anyway. There’s no good market for milo in my area. The latest I ever planted corn was on July 4th and it made grain. I know it’s not what you asked, but in my experience I would rather have late corn than late Milo. 

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Throw the seed in a grain drill and drill it. Plug off every other hole if so desired. 
Is it for feed or grain?

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Looks like a minimum of 6-7" of air pressure is recommended for milo on a Cyclo.

A lot of milo was planted by Cyclos in the 70s through the 90s around here. Everybody liked the central fill for milo. Think everyone used a 72 hole drum. 

Milo is one of those crops that some years there is a lot of it grown locally, some years not very much. Wouldn't think milo would fare well in an "I" state....milo loves hot, dry weather like a cactus (or our sunflowers).

We have a couple birdseed plants around here, so there's always a market for it. Milo's proponents always point out how much cheaper it is to plant than many other crops.

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4 hours ago, Lazy WP said:

Throw the seed in a grain drill and drill it. Plug off every other hole if so desired. 
Is it for feed or grain?

They'd chop it for the dairy cows. 

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5 hours ago, Lazy WP said:

Throw the seed in a grain drill and drill it. Plug off every other hole if so desired. 
Is it for feed or grain?

That is what I did last time I planted it!  LOL.  It was only a couple of acres though.  It produced well though!

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2 hours ago, FarmerFixEmUp said:

They'd chop it for the dairy cows. 

Drill it. 

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Back when there were alot of dairies round here some grew some Milo silage.

It will make good silage but not normally as good as corn. It's better than corn in a drought if the corn is dryland.

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On 5/10/2024 at 4:35 PM, Lazy WP said:

Drill it. 

I don't know anyone around with a drill anymore.  Probably more broadcast seeders than drills. 

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1 hour ago, FarmerFixEmUp said:

I don't know anyone around with a drill anymore.  Probably more broadcast seeders than drills. 

Interesting. I don’t think I have ever been around an area that doesn’t have drills. Different stuff in different areas. 

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Guys that used to plant soybeans with drills called them a "controlled spill" like the Joh Deere bean cups. Everyone went to Kinze bean units on planters or belt meters on drills. No beans here drilled anynore. 

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7 hours ago, FarmerFixEmUp said:

Guys that used to plant soybeans with drills called them a "controlled spill" like the Joh Deere bean cups. Everyone went to Kinze bean units on planters or belt meters on drills. No beans here drilled anynore. 

I would guess that nearly 80% of the beans around here are drilled. Over that percentage of sorghum/milo and even some corn is drilled with air seeders. 

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6 hours ago, Lazy WP said:

I would guess that nearly 80% of the beans around here are drilled. Over that percentage of sorghum/milo and even some corn is drilled with air seeders. 

30” planters are way cheaper to maintain than a drill. It’s not even close. I had to put 128 openers on our 40’ Great Plains drill. The 60’ planter only takes 48. Better meters, better depth control, just more accurate in general. The same tractor that it takes to pull that drill can pull the 60’ planter too. So 20’ more per pass. There’s just no upside to narrow rows here when planting row crops. 

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15 minutes ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

30” planters are way cheaper to maintain than a drill. It’s not even close. I had to put 128 openers on our 40’ Great Plains drill. The 60’ planter only takes 48. Better meters, better depth control, just more accurate in general. The same tractor that it takes to pull that drill can pull the 60’ planter too. So 20’ more per pass. There’s just no upside to narrow rows here when planting row crops. 

Not going to argue. I am just saying what is here. We were 90% wheat when I first moved to this area in 1999. Probably still over 70%. 
There aren’t any many chemicals for Milo, so close row spacing is important. Milo will out perform corn in our area and there’s a decent market for it. 

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