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I aint ever physically seen a W4 W6 or any of them western tractors they aint none in Kentucky my home state


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Can anybody else say theyve never seen one cause you wont and aint going to find one here in south central Kentucky or any part of Ky.  Kentucky runs 550 miles East to West and on the average probably 140 miles North to South but in eastern Ky it could be over 200 miles North to South.  Ive sold and traded and consigned machinery and we even owned a International dealership and they just dont exist in the south

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3 minutes ago, Hydro70 said:

Can anybody else say theyve never seen one cause you wont and aint going to find one here in south central Kentucky or any part of Ky.  Kentucky runs 550 miles East to West and on the average probably 140 miles North to South but in eastern Ky it could be over 200 miles North to South.  Ive sold and traded and consigned machinery and we even owned a International dealership and they just dont exist in the south

There are lots of tractors I’ve never seen and some none of you have ever seen.  To stay on topic I’ve have seen a few W6s but never have seen a W4.  They were just way too small for the western wheat belt.  

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I have seen W-4's and W-6's, both regular and super, but I've only ever seen one W-9 in the wild, at an estate sale, here in Central New York. It was really beat up. I never even bid.

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an older friend of mine who has travelled some in the USA for tractor shows told me he has been told by more than 1 old timer down there they didn't push them south of the border. very little if any literature back then on the W4 or W6 tractors.

I sold one to an oldtimer 30 years ago in Minnesota who said he never saw one before. We got a lot of them up here. I think the farms were smaller with most 100-150 acres back then and growing season was too short for corn not too far much north of here so Farmalls were not necessary . Also maybe for the few acres of corn each farmer grew back then they may have used horses for that chore.. much of this is opinion as it was long before my time

A friend in Alberta told me W4s were scarce out there, 

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lots of w4's around here, and tons of w6's, w9's are more scarce. just picked up a restored w4, will post pics when i get it home.

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Here In North central North Dakota w4,6 and nines were around. H and Ms out numbered 5 to 1 but we have worked on a w4 done a lot on w6s messed around with the w9 wd9 650 and such. Even used to be standard 560s and 660s around.  

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I owned a Super W-6 TA for a few years Robbie. I bought it in Ilinois and fixed it up. I sold it a few years later to a boy in middle TN. They are mean to drive with you legs out in front of you and you sit far back.I would never own one again. 

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4,6 and 9 a plenty up here a couple W6' sold at auction on the weekend one a SW6TA for $4500

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1 hour ago, Big Bud guy said:

There are lots of tractors I’ve never seen and some none of you have ever seen.  To stay on topic I’ve have seen a few W6s but never have seen a W4.  They were just way too small for the western wheat belt.  

Have a W4 don't like the position of the PTO

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I’m really surprised by what I’ve found out here in western Montana. It’s not a big agriculture area, mostly hay and little ranches at that.

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Picked up a -4 and a -6 last year.  Have a WD-9 and W-9 also.  A 650 sat for several years at a place but disappeared one day.  I should have stopped and asked about it.

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Found this white Cub (can’t claim it is a demonstrator but all the casting codes are correct). Plus I wanted it. Have a Cub with high and wide options that came from northern Idaho and a Low-boy. I have about all of the gas letter series. Found a BN but the owner wouldn’t part with it. I’ll come across one eventually.  Passed on a I-6 at auction. I don’t know why but there is a good variety of letter series out here if you are patient.  I’d like to have a Super W-6TA to go with my Ws as well as the SMTA and 400 I have. Guess I need a 450 too. 

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34 minutes ago, 48 farmall M said:

Have a W4 don't like the position of the PTO

its the same housing as an H. just curious what you dislike about it

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A neighbor had a WD9 before I was born but traded it for a new 856.  He said it was a good tractor for it's day very stout.

Never seen one in person around here but have seen a few WxR (whatever the rice versions were) in the old rice belt of eastern Arkansas (Lonoke, Stutgart, etc).

 

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I would say purchasing a W9 in its day gave an advantage to bigger farming today, a Ford 8N would have been a 1 quarter farmer, a W9 would have been looking at 2 and maybe 3, forward that advantage to today.

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28 minutes ago, hardtail said:

I would say purchasing a W9 in its day gave an advantage to bigger farming today, a Ford 8N would have been a 1 quarter farmer, a W9 would have been looking at 2 and maybe 3, forward that advantage to today.

My great grandpa only farmed with one tractor at a time his whole life and he farmed just over 750 acres with an all fuel W9 and then later a WD9.  Half crop half fallow.  He did finish his career on a 4020 farming the same acres.  

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They are all common in our area. W6 most common. When Grandpa bought ours he wanted a W6 but couldn't get one. There are orchards a plenty just north of here so they had an OS6 (orchard special). He bought that and took the skirting off. I remember it was still here when I was a sprout. I specifically remember the front wheels being different than the normal of that era. 

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12 hours ago, Red_Man said:

I owned a Super W-6 TA for a few years Robbie. I bought it in Ilinois and fixed it up. I sold it a few years later to a boy in middle TN. They are mean to drive with you legs out in front of you and you sit far back.I would never own one again. 

And there as ugly as all get out....haha.  My brother Charlie sure is liking it at the Fendt/Massey Ferguson dealership and they got him doing the same job beiing shop foreman and the Fendt side of the business covers a area from here to north central Ky and theyve sold two or three big tractors to a farmer up in Paris, Ky and over towards Bowling Green and theyve moved five or six of them big Fendt combines, the ones that ya drive with a joy stick and not a steering wheel.  High Tech Farming Red Man

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The W series was just mainly raw horsepower. Nothing fancy.

Put them in a big field and maybe on at least 1/2 mile, if not mile, rounds.

They were the four wheel drives of the day.

Just get on them, point them in the right direction and turn around once in awhile.

The first Steiger was built to save man power and get more done.

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I always find it intersting how different it is between different areas. I've seen plenty of the W series around here. More so when I was a kid compared to now. Alot of those old tractors went for scrap when it was up 15-20 years ago. But there's still lots on auctions I've seen in the praries here. We got a W4 here, there was one down the road with a loader mounted on it. Couple W6's in the area. W9's were a bit less common from what I hear but still a bunch of guys farmed with them and the WD6/9

The W4 here was mostly a bush tractor for dad in its later years, then got parked when he quit that work. Must've been a good 10 years later I wanted to get it going to put on the rake maybe. I woulda been maybe 13? Anyway we pulled the saw mandrell off, I got fresh gas going to the carb, put a new battery on, gave the crank a couple spins, and it fired! Couple more times and it was running! I had one of the biggest grins ever on my face that day driving it around the yard! Lol

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38 minutes ago, db1486 said:

We got a W4 here, there was one down the road with a loader mounted on it.

Must've been a good 10 years later I wanted to get it going to put on the rake

There were relatively speaking lots of M and Hs around here that was used for those kinda jobs and did it better.  That’s why W4s were kinda of a pointless tractor for this area.  In fact row crop tractors were much more popular than the small end wheatland tractors of any color around here.  There were even Farmall As in the neighborhood which were more useful. 

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My dad's uncles farmed with W6, W9, H and and M over the years. Even had a couple Ws with loaders. Clumsy loader tractors.

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17 hours ago, Hydro70 said:

Can anybody else say theyve never seen one cause you wont and aint going to find one here in south central Kentucky or any part of Ky.  Kentucky runs 550 miles East to West and on the average probably 140 miles North to South but in eastern Ky it could be over 200 miles North to South.  Ive sold and traded and consigned machinery and we even owned a International dealership and they just dont exist in the south

I just saw 2 W4s and 1 W6 in Eastern TN over the weekend and a W9 that was the main tractor on a dairy there at one time.

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W4 was very common here (my part of Eastern Canada). Have one in the shed now.  Way back in the day farms bought either a Farmall A or a W4.  The odd W6 was around. Was not a row crop area, including those that bought the A really didn't cultivate with them, just used them to replace a team. 

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