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Chain harrows


cobfly

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Already got some coming. Mainly used for pasture and hay ground with a little arena work thrown in. Just curious of folks experiences with them. Now and again they will be used on a reseed. Thanks

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Had a set, they worked really good in clean, soft ground. Roots, rocks and weeds were a pain though. They also worked good for dragging pastures down, but again seemed to catch a lot of trash. A friend of mine wanted them worse than I did so I sold them and built myself a tire drag that I like better.

Mac

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Did you pull them in the aggressive setting or the less aggressive setting?

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Just now, cobfly said:

Did you pull them in the aggressive setting or the less aggressive setting?

I pulled them both ways; the less aggressive (teeth pointing rearward) helped a lot of the trash flow, especially when dragging pastures down. The aggressive setting did a really nice job in clean ground (like an arena) but ain't worth eight rotten eggs if there are any roots, weeds, etc. around. Just balls them up and then you have to clean it out. I will say, it also could've been my particular harrow. A lot of guys use the chain harrows and like them; I personally prefer an adjustable spike tooth on worked ground and my semi tire drag on pastures. My opinion, of course, and worth exactly what you paid for it!

Mac

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I think I will be okay as everything gets grazed down pretty good. Thanks for your input.

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18 minutes ago, cobfly said:

I think I will be okay as everything gets grazed down pretty good. Thanks for your input.

Uncles’ used to pull them as last pass on new seeding ground before drilling. That’s as close as I’ve been to them. I think they would be good pasture drags too. 

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1 hour ago, cobfly said:

Now and again they will be used on a reseed. Thanks

Can’t give you any advice on the harrows, but if you want to reseed I would recommend some kind of roller to follow the harrowing and seeding.  Really seems to help get grass seed and alfalfa to germinate.

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I have a roller. Just tired of my old, patched up, bar harrows that will break every 20 acres and are plumb wore out.

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9 hours ago, TN Hillbilly said:

Ive used one. They work great to break up and spread cow pies. Never used one for seeding.

Used one for seeding every year. usually goes smooth and not very much washout. never used a roller for spring oats or barley

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.......this outfit  where I run the Excavator, seeds  about  1000 acres per year of various  grass and brassica's  etc...  The place is all stones...so any ''aggressive''   harrows are of no use as they will tend to pull up the stones, despite the drill coulters set to minimum depth etc etc.

Because the young Station Manager loves bright shiny   things, the older Kiwi made drill has been cast aside for the new 163, 000$   air seeder...etc GPS and John Deere with coffee cups ..but ...due to the variation of ground level, it does not do a very nice job....I foolishly  suggested what we call ''following harrows''...but of course it was pointed out to me, that when you have a JD that cost 350 K  and the air seeder at 163 K, you don't spoil this  opulent image  by dragging following harrows behind it....

So...but Cob, the following harrows are just five inch rings with a slew of interconnecting linkages that come off a 3 inch pipe beam in front and another behind, about three feet    behind the front beam...and no ''teeth '' of any sort ...thus they just scuff over the terrain , smoothing out and covering the seed.....and rolling straight over any ''rubbish'....

I used to drill with the old NZ made drill...you could drill a bloody river bed with it...but it has long lost its first flush of youth .....thus it has not been used of late , but it was far superior to the new ''ghee whiz'' model...and that fact was always evidenced as the brassica crops were fed off ...in the winter....

...and as a tragic foot note to this epistle, the big JD, at around 3000  hrs was happily drilling away . when it suddenly reared up , front wheels flailing at thin air several feet above the terrain, then it shrieked with pain, obviously coming from its bowels , and collapsed  and died.......and the subsequent diagnosis revealed a 'parts bill'  of an estimated $75 to $80k NZ.....(the CTV  or whatever it is, transmission...)

Just doing what JD does best...costing shitpiles of money

Mike

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We used them behind the field cultivator in this clay ground when there seemed to be no other way to break up the lumps. They worked ok until you turned too short and they got tangled up! The best use was to drag the land next to the ditch after they did a brush cleaning.. they grabbed every stick in the ground... I would pull them in reverse with the loader, pick the thing up and clean the trash out. 

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