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From what I’ve heard from people I know that ship to OV they are happy. A couple had shipped to other organic markets before and said OV is a better choice. 

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41 minutes ago, Red666 said:

From what I’ve heard from people I know that ship to OV they are happy. A couple had shipped to other organic markets before and said OV is a better choice. 

Thanks. It all sounds very enticing especially with the prices selling "conventional" milk. We have talked about it for some time. It's rather intriguing to hear they are looking for milk. 

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27 minutes ago, MinnesotaFarmall said:

Thanks. It all sounds very enticing especially with the prices selling "conventional" milk. We have talked about it for some time. It's rather intriguing to hear they are looking for milk. 

Locally all but 1 (prob had 10) have quit OV complaining of poor service and prices.  One guy ..... whew.  What jerks, shame they are a coop who trwated a young guy like they did.  One guy moved to WI and says same coop but different culture and prices.  Fwiw data is showing Orgazi milk sales are poor...maybe going up.  The Nut juice thing hurt them more than traditional milk.  But out west here there are tons whom have quit.  In CA I understand they cut off many guys N of Bay area recently.  Trust, but verify if you switch, maybe best deal ever of fits your operation.  Maybe not.  But with the current prices no one can go much longer .... sad time.

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32 minutes ago, MinnesotaFarmall said:

Thanks. It all sounds very enticing especially with the prices selling "conventional" milk. We have talked about it for some time. It's rather intriguing to hear they are looking for milk. 

If you aren’t already organic, isn’t it years of being organic before you can call it organic? 

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50 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

If you aren’t already organic, isn’t it years of being organic before you can call it organic? 

Three year transition. We are for the most part organic besides fertilizer. Really rarely treat any animals anymore thankfully. Seems like they are always behind when they are treated and don't catch up with the rest of the herd so culling them if at all possible is the best route. Besides fertilizer in the field end of it, our corn starter fert is chicken/turkey manure based and passed for organic. Besides little things here and there it may be the better option with some more added labors. Our base price is little over $14 so something has to change. We are too big in my opinion to do our own bottling and transport we would have to haul at least 45 miles in any direction to be able to market the volume we produce. 

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55 minutes ago, TroyDairy said:

Locally all but 1 (prob had 10) have quit OV complaining of poor service and prices.  One guy ..... whew.  What jerks, shame they are a coop who trwated a young guy like they did.  One guy moved to WI and says same coop but different culture and prices.  Fwiw data is showing Orgazi milk sales are poor...maybe going up.  The Nut juice thing hurt them more than traditional milk.  But out west here there are tons whom have quit.  In CA I understand they cut off many guys N of Bay area recently.  Trust, but verify if you switch, maybe best deal ever of fits your operation.  Maybe not.  But with the current prices no one can go much longer .... sad time.

Troy, us dairymen have to stick together but sadly like my grandpa put it, "A farmer is his own worst enemy. If prices are down, he makes more commodity to offset cost. If the prices are up, he makes more commodity to offset the down years." We have basically flooded ourselves out of a market and we continue to do so. These "niche" markets seem to be really catching on in our area. Lots of "greenies" looking for the closest thing to raising it themselves. Which is good, not knocking them any. Just tossing a label so to speak. If all of us could ban together and literally just dump our milk for a week or so straight, I would come to think we could make a turn around. The problem being is we are all for the most part up to our ears in trying to stay afloat that we can't let the waters of dept come over our head for any much longer. 

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I sell dairy hay to a organic grass based dairy in Indiana. He feeds grass hay only. No grains. His price per 100 weight with premiums is $40.00

I would not certify with MOSA

Check out NICS smaller easier company to deal with.

Good luck and it sounds like you may be set up for an easy transition. 

My dad and i have been certified organic since 1999. 

 

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Many producers over the last 25 years have thought the price of organic milk would save them, but found out the extra management wasn’t there thing and went broke before figuring out how to make production. I have a classmate and good friend whose family made the switch in the late 90’s and truly made it successful. After a few years they quit growing grain and went exclusively hay, with combinations of grasses and legumes that I find fascinating yet to complicated to remember off hand. If I was going to milk cows organically I would seriously consider that route because weed pressure in hay is much easier to deal with than corn!

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8 hours ago, MinnesotaFarmall said:

Troy, us dairymen have to stick together but sadly like my grandpa put it, "A farmer is his own worst enemy. If prices are down, he makes more commodity to offset cost. If the prices are up, he makes more commodity to offset the down years." We have basically flooded ourselves out of a market and we continue to do so. These "niche" markets seem to be really catching on in our area. Lots of "greenies" looking for the closest thing to raising it themselves. Which is good, not knocking them any. Just tossing a label so to speak. If all of us could ban together and literally just dump our milk for a week or so straight, I would come to think we could make a turn around. The problem being is we are all for the most part up to our ears in trying to stay afloat that we can't let the waters of dept come over our head for any much longer. 

  Two things.  Could you ship milk that could be certified as organic today?  Farmers tried dumping milk during the Great Depression and yielded nothing.  That was at a time where consumers thought they had to have it.  Today most are willing to get along without it.  Some people just think they have to be the contrarian to mass thinking.  I swear some would glue their nostrils shut if somebody made a big deal about clean nasal passages.  Like what was said too much product is in production for the demand especially in the Northern US.  

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59 minutes ago, 2+2love said:

Organic grain prices are down right now.

$7.00 corn and $18.00 soybeans and $7.00 wheat. Good quality dairy hay is always high and not hard to sell. 

  All niches get flooded over time.  Go back far enough McDonald's was a niche in the restaurant business.  Now it is collapsing under its own weight.  

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8 hours ago, MinnesotaFarmall said:

Troy, us dairymen have to stick together but sadly like my grandpa put it, "A farmer is his own worst enemy. If prices are down, he makes more commodity to offset cost. If the prices are up, he makes more commodity to offset the down years." We have basically flooded ourselves out of a market and we continue to do so. These "niche" markets seem to be really catching on in our area. Lots of "greenies" looking for the closest thing to raising it themselves. Which is good, not knocking them any. Just tossing a label so to speak. If all of us could ban together and literally just dump our milk for a week or so straight, I would come to think we could make a turn around. The problem being is we are all for the most part up to our ears in trying to stay afloat that we can't let the waters of dept come over our head for any much longer. 

Don’t knock yourself over the head. Farmers, dairy farmers especially, are the latest on the chopping block of big ag.

The experts claim too much milk, then turn around and tell farmers the only thing you can do is produce more milk… so which is it, too much milk, or not enough milk…? 
We have a failed ag policy. We have huge conglomerates who have corrupted the small localized cooperatives which has diluted local markets with milk from other regions. We have these same companies who we entrusted with the sale of our products through market research and just plain old marketing, choose the cheapest route possible to get the milk to market with minimal cost to them, as that cost/benefit ratio is favorable for them, and not the dairy farmers.
We have consumers who if given the health benefits of dairy, would choose dairy, but because these consumers are bombarded with negative reviews about milk, choose alternatives. 
There is a market for dairy, if not the likes of Walmart wouldn’t be looking into dairy expansion. But, as dairy policy and ag policy goes, bigger is better, and that’s all that matters. 
Good luck with your decision. I sincerely mean that. Dairy farming has become a business where falling on your own sword is becoming the norm… sadly 😖

 

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5 minutes ago, Ihfan4life said:

Don’t knock yourself over the head. Farmers, dairy farmers especially, are the latest on the chopping block of big ag.

The experts claim too much milk, then turn around and tell farmers the only thing you can do is produce more milk… so which is it, too much milk, or not enough milk…? 
We have a failed ag policy. We have huge conglomerates who have corrupted the small localized cooperatives which has diluted local markets with milk from other regions. We have these same companies who we entrusted with the sale of our products through market research and just plain old marketing, choose the cheapest route possible to get the milk to market with minimal cost to them, as that cost/benefit ratio is favorable for them, and not the dairy farmers.
We have consumers who if given the health benefits of dairy, would choose dairy, but because these consumers are bombarded with negative reviews about milk, choose alternatives. 
There is a market for dairy, if not the likes of Walmart wouldn’t be looking into dairy expansion. But, as dairy policy and ag policy goes, bigger is better, and that’s all that matters. 
Good luck with your decision. I sincerely mean that. Dairy farming has become a business where falling on your own sword is becoming the norm… sadly 😖

 

  There is too much milk for the demand.  US farmers want a free market meaning taking a chance that they can sell what they produce at a profit.  Quotas like what the Canadians use has always been considered a dirty word in the US.  Every farmer thinks that they will walk away the big winner in the poker game of farming and if the other guy fails then so be it.  

  Walmart does not look at it as though there is enough room for one more and everybody can live happily forever more.  Walmart wants to be the last man standing after the poker game is done.  The other guys be darned.  From what I have heard they believe in vertical integration meaning producing their own milk.  So where will independents sell their milk if Walmart can sell a gallon of milk 75 cents or more cheaper than the co-op?

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All of you are correct I do believe. There's many variables in the industry that are settig ourselves back. Mostly I think that it is a market that is being over produced with diminishing value to the consumer. It's been a long rough ride even before milk alternatives, and now it's rougher so to speak. I wish a guy could fix it and just have as many mom and pop farms as there was many years ago. 

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9 minutes ago, MinnesotaFarmall said:

All of you are correct I do believe. There's many variables in the industry that are settig ourselves back. Mostly I think that it is a market that is being over produced with diminishing value to the consumer. It's been a long rough ride even before milk alternatives, and now it's rougher so to speak. I wish a guy could fix it and just have as many mom and pop farms as there was many years ago. 

  There is no putting the genie back in the bottle.  Mass production of milk came with bulk tanks and vacuum milkers.  Do we go back to the 1930's in terms of milk production technology?  While we are at it do we go back to F20, unstyled JD A's, and Oliver 70's so more people can farm?  Serious questions.  

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13 minutes ago, 766 Man said:

  There is no putting the genie back in the bottle.  Mass production of milk came with bulk tanks and vacuum milkers.  Do we go back to the 1930's in terms of milk production technology?  While we are at it do we go back to F20, unstyled JD A's, and Oliver 70's so more people can farm?  Serious questions.  

Sometimes I wonder if back to the basics would fix most of the worlds problems. And you are correct, mass production is when refrigerated systems came into effect. Ways to keep and store food has always plagued humans, and now we have found ways to keep it palatable for a very long time. Milk production has went up almost always throughout the history of the industry, so like my grandpa said we cut our own throats. 

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12 minutes ago, MinnesotaFarmall said:

Sometimes I wonder if back to the basics would fix most of the worlds problems. And you are correct, mass production is when refrigerated systems came into effect. Ways to keep and store food has always plagued humans, and now we have found ways to keep it palatable for a very long time. Milk production has went up almost always throughout the history of the industry, so like my grandpa said we cut our own throats. 

  North America had a taste of freedom never previously experienced by humans when WWII ended the US and Canadian manufacturing bases were the only ones left standing.  Couple that with a flood of foreign currency coming in to buy food and other products meant that people had choices unimagined before.  You did not have to farm for a living and many chose not to by educating themselves and then being employed in other fields.  A lot of technology that came in agriculture was the result of compensating for the exodus of people out of farming.  Do many people want to return to the land in 2024?  Could it be accomplished in a free and peaceful manner?

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1 hour ago, 766 Man said:

  All niches get flooded over time.  Go back far enough McDonald's was a niche in the restaurant business.  Now it is collapsing under its own weight.  

its also collapsing because it sucks, bottom of the barrel in the fast food market IMO. 

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2 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

its also collapsing because it sucks, bottom of the barrel in the fast food market IMO. 

  That's the beauty of competition.  If you do not like one business' product then you can buy from somebody else.  For most like myself the products were edible and some things were actually good such as the fries.  But there were certainly better eating experiences.  I remember it said during McD's hey day of the 1970's kids were the drivers of McD's and parents went along to placate them plus the bill was acceptable on a blue collar paycheck.

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Just now, 766 Man said:

  That's the beauty of competition.  If you do not like one business' product then you can buy from somebody else.  For most like myself the products were edible and some things were actually good such as the fries.  But there were certainly better eating experiences.  I remember it said during McD's hey day of the 1970's kids were the drivers of McD's and parents went along to placate them plus the bill was acceptable on a blue collar paycheck.

I try to avoid fast food if possible, most of the time i end up eating McD's is when it is the only available option, truck stop or whatever. it has convenience going for it, beyond that....

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9 minutes ago, 766 Man said:

  North America had a taste of freedom never previously experienced by humans when WWII ended the US and Canadian manufacturing bases were the only ones left standing.  Couple that with a flood of foreign currency coming in to buy food and other products meant that people had choices unimagined before.  You did not have to farm for a living and many chose not to by educating themselves and then being employed in other fields.  A lot of technology that came in agriculture was the result of compensating for the exodus of people out of farming.  Do many people want to return to the land in 2024?  Could it be accomplished in a free and peaceful manner?

It seems as if there is an uptick in our area for agriculture. Lots of little hobby farmers popping back in and farming what were once fields and have grown into willows. Land rental prices are up with the demand. 

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7 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

I try to avoid fast food if possible, most of the time i end up eating McD's is when it is the only available option, truck stop or whatever. it has convenience going for it, beyond that....

  In most parts of civilized New York McD's is usually no more than 10-15 minutes away from a given geographic point.  So, yes I stop there if far away from home and starving at the moment.  

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4 hours ago, brewcrew said:

Many producers over the last 25 years have thought the price of organic milk would save them, but found out the extra management wasn’t there thing and went broke before figuring out how to make production. I have a classmate and good friend whose family made the switch in the late 90’s and truly made it successful. After a few years they quit growing grain and went exclusively hay, with combinations of grasses and legumes that I find fascinating yet to complicated to remember off hand. If I was going to milk cows organically I would seriously consider that route because weed pressure in hay is much easier to deal with than corn!

  It's a lot of work to do organic especially when you have to work cows from pasture to barn then back out to pasture.  Clean cows, clean barns, and clean pastures are a must which quite a few are not willing to do.  Ways to goose production such as corn silage are not allowed in most cases.  Are the genetics even there in cattle anymore to make good use of hay meaning large framed animals?  Dad said his father while not a master at cow breeding had cows that would make good use of things that grew well on the farm such as clovers and trefoil.  Then the cycle changed where corn silage and alfalfa gave a decided edge to production and therefore profit.

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