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1206 Planter options


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I will be farming for the first time this spring and will be using a 1206 for my tractor. I have a small acreage (20 acres) to start with so do not need large implements. I am looking at John Deere 700/7200 and IH Cyclo for a planter. I am wanting feedback on how large of planter the 1206 will handle as in six or twelve row and if the tractor hydraulics will be sufficient or if I need to use a PTO pump.

 

Thank you

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17 minutes ago, Dave Feldman said:

I will be farming for the first time this spring and will be using a 1206 for my tractor. I am looking at John Deere 700/7200 and IH Cyclo for a planter. I am wanting feedback on how large of planter the 1206 will handle as in six or twelve row and if the tractor hydraulics will be sufficient or if I need to use a PTO pump.

 

Thank you

Dad used a 12rn 500 cyclo behind a 1206 for years no problem. With fuel prices I'd go with a 7000 jd finger pickup or kinze 12rn kelderman fold and shift up throttle back.

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Some years back Marion Calmer was asked what he thought was the perfect planter. He said IH's row unit, White's metering system, Kinze's toolbar, and John Deere paint so it carries the most resale.

A 1206 will pull most any 8 or 12 row planter but something with hydraulic demand beyond folding will require a pto pump. Newer planters are insanely complicated and I'm not convinced there's an economic benefit. The IH row unit is still superior at consistent and uncomplicated seed depth with offset openers and pulled gauge wheels.

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  Buy the simplest plateless planter either JD or Kinze.  Get it early and bring it in the shop ASAP.  If it takes a brute to turn a shaft then you have bearing issues.  Remove chains and turn shafts until you isloate the problem.  Stiff chains need to be replaced.  A new to you JD or Kinze need to have the metering units closely inspected.  Most likely the finger assemblies and belts need to be replaced.  Dealers have test stands to run meters and even though it costs initially it pays in the field.  Parallel linkages should work freely but not be sloppy.  Row units should pull straight and not be twisted or crooked.  Seed opener disks should turn freely and touch each other.  Seed boots should have no breaks and be firmly secure to the row units.  Closing wheels should turn freely and springs not broken.  Getting late to send a monitor out for inspection but do it if possible.  Hook up the monitor once inspected to make sure each sensor records seed being dropped.  Fertilizer systems need freely flexing chain, good bearings, and clean passages (boots).  If equipped with drive clutches make sure clutch dogs mate precisely, move freely, and springs apply pressure as needed.  Others will point out other service issues depending on model of planter.

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If you are not in big square fields, a 12 row will leave you with a lot of overlap, gaps, or the need to get on and off a lot to shut off rows unless you have new enough to have gps row shutoffs. Smaller planters are more likely to have fertilizer, allowing you to put in on in the row where your plants need it rather than broadcasting it. That can save fertilizer while also giving you a better yield. Just some opinions. Your individual needs and wants will vary.

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40 minutes ago, acem said:

Get a 4 or 6 row. 

800/900 cyclo is a very good planter.

The JD 7000 series is very good also.

A smaller planter will take up less shed space.

  My thought is simplicity when recommending a planter.  There are fewer "systems" to watch with the older finger pickup type planters.  No engine RPM level which is critical to maintain, no electrical system gremlins, minimal hydraulic system reliance, or watchdogging hydraulic control levers.  I've seen some pretty smart people have trouble operating anything but the most basic row crop planter.  One guy with a Kinze 2000 would usually forget to power up the monitor ahead of starting a field.  Sometimes he would plant the entire field with the monitor off.  He was the biggest account with the local Kinze dealer and was arrogant as the day is long so the dealer really baby sat him to make sales with him.  

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For 20 acres, a 4 row would be fine!   Problem....a usable 4 or 6 row planter will bring 4x more on an auction that a 8 row.   Everybody wants one for "food plots" or "filling in".  I have seen 8 row planters in great shape bring $750, while the worn out 6 row right beside it sold for $3500.

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6 minutes ago, Jeff-C-IL said:

For 20 acres, a 4 row would be fine!   Problem....a usable 4 or 6 row planter will bring 4x more on an auction that a 8 row.   Everybody wants one for "food plots" or "filling in".  I have seen 8 row planters in great shape bring $750, while the worn out 6 row right beside it sold for $3500.

  A lot of truth in what you said.  I would say an 8 row would be OK as long as it did not need to be towed width-wise down the road.  Good 4 rows are getting to be hard to find in JD or IH even here in the NE.  White and AC actually made very good plateless planters but then an owner needs to know something about automotive type electrical systems.  Not something everybody is good at.  White 5100 would have a hydraulic driven blower which means another system to maintain.  Again, something that not everybody can handle.  You have to remember to activate your PTO, get engine RPM's up, and turn on the monitor.  For beginners the KISS (keep it simple stupid) system is often best.

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I'd go with a Deere 7000,  8 or 12-row (they will be cheaper than a 4 or 6-row).

A 12-0 will play with any of them,  and you will have room to grow.

I've never really planted with it, but I hooked mine to my bean planter,  with the splitter bar locked up and unhooked,  to fill in some drowned-out spots a few years back.

When I got in the field I found more bare spots than I had anticipated,  after an hour or so I was starting to think "I should have used a tractor with a cab and AC"

IMG_4475 (600 x 450).jpg

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What does ‘forseeable future’ mean to you? 2 years, 5?, 10?, 15?

Look at dealer support in your area, if no dealer  reasonable close for the brand you choose, what good is that?

How will you harvest the crop? Custom operator? Yourself? If custom operators in your area, what are they setup for? Wide row, or narrow? If they only run 12 row headers, a 6 row planter to you will be worthless(nobody can plant straight enough for it to work).

What is going to cost you, to purchase a combine/picker, etc., for wide row, narrow row?

Whats it going to cost to purchase a cultivator setup for wide rows? Narrow rows?

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I know I could pull a larger planter, but the storage required, the hassle of folding/ unfolding with fertilizer and nitrogen units on each row.  Plus, more investment to repair 12 rows vs 6..... 

The original poster was dealing with 20 acres, so lots of boxes with very little seed in each of them!

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Unless you are in an area where wide rows are still common (LA, MS), which IA is NOT, I would definitely start with 30" rows - most common today.   Much more likely to find equipment, or get custom work done, unless you make a definite choice to own all your own equipment in wide row.   

For instance, I have all my own 36" 8  row equipment for corn.  Buying 36" row equipment is CHEAP.  Nobody wants it.   BUT.....I can't rent a 36" sidedress rig anywhere anymore, I can't hire a neighbor to combine if mine broke down....even custom spraying --  " Our tires are set for 30" rows, sorry."  

BTW, a 8-30 JD 7000 is only 20' wide, not that hard to drive down the road.    The 28' of a 8r wide is.   

You can plant 6 and harvest 12 - or plant 8 and harvest 6 -  its not ideal, but if you plant generally straight, and don't have all curves, its not that bad.   I know a guy that plants 10 and harvests 6!

One issue you might have with a 1206 on any planter (esp 8-12 row) - if its fully loaded with seed and liquid fertilizer, you may need to swap out the pressure release valve for a higher pressure one.  I had to do that before my 806 would raise the 8 row 7000.    

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Last spring, the 1206 lost the clutch during the start of soybeans.   (I remove the nitrogen coulters for soybeans anyway.)  The 826 hydro pulled it perfectly.   Plan to use it on soybeans again this spring.   Purchased a second monitor for it. Now I can switch over to soybeans quickly and if it rains me out,  I have the 1206 free to mount the nitrogen applicator on the 3 point. 

20230527_114808.thumb.jpg.320ceaea09e8378d3940892160963f2b.jpg

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27 minutes ago, Jeff-C-IL said:

Unless you are in an area where wide rows are still common (LA, MS), which IA is NOT, I would definitely start with 30" rows - most common today.   Much more likely to find equipment, or get custom work done, unless you make a definite choice to own all your own equipment in wide row.   

For instance, I have all my own 36" 8  row equipment for corn.  Buying 36" row equipment is CHEAP.  Nobody wants it.   BUT.....I can't rent a 36" sidedress rig anywhere anymore, I can't hire a neighbor to combine if mine broke down....even custom spraying --  " Our tires are set for 30" rows, sorry."  

 

I have a customer planting on 4 row 38" and he asked me if I'd do his corn last summer. He had a MF 850 combine that was shot. I found a 4 row wide corn head on Big Iron and got it for $400. About 120 miles away in Nebraska. It even had stalk stompers on it. Worked great, just had to lift the ladder on the TR86 to keep from knocking the next row over.  There were a few guys around with 36" spaced heads but some corn won't tolerate that difference, Corn ears flying off the side of the head. 

https://www.auctiontime.com/listings/farm-equipment/auction-results/218895631/new-holland-974

 

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On 2/13/2024 at 3:32 PM, nepoweshiekfarmalls said:

I know I could pull a larger planter, but the storage required, the hassle of folding/ unfolding with fertilizer and nitrogen units on each row.  Plus, more investment to repair 12 rows vs 6..... 

The original poster was dealing with 20 acres, so lots of boxes with very little seed in each of them!

Amen. Why would you even consider a twelve row for 20 acres?!

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